whyamihere

whyamihere

Lives in United States Philadelphia, United States
Works as a Educational IT
Joined on Apr 8, 2012

Comments

Total: 122, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

Fearless Spiff: It really is a joke. I am more than pi**ed.

...Why? It's a free photo editing app that's going to be included with every Mac. I'm not sure what your expectations were.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 9, 2015 at 19:04 UTC
In reply to:

BeaverTerror: When Aperture's discontinuation was announced a year ago, certain individuals on theses forums attempted to defend Apple's decision with the old "don't bash something that hasn't even been released".

Now that the Photos App has turned out to be just as much of an abomination as we all predicted, it's time to eat your socks.

Suck it.

There, there, cranky commentator, we all knew Photos wasn't going to replace Aperture. Everyone experiences a bout of denial from time to time.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 9, 2015 at 19:00 UTC
On Sony Alpha a7 II Review preview (779 comments in total)
In reply to:

jhinkey: "All the size/weight advantages of not having a mirror mechanism are negated the second you try to squeeze an IBIS system inside the body."

Hardly. It's still smaller and lighter than the D750.

Who is the editor of these articles?

I would imagine that the author(s) are referring to the fact that the A7II weighs roughly the same as a mid-range DSLR. It's not far off in weight from a D7100, for example. It's not a precise apples-to-apples comparison, in terms of overall specs, but it's something certain customers might concern themselves with.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 31, 2015 at 22:48 UTC
On Sony Alpha a7 II Review preview (779 comments in total)

Thank you, DPR crew, for another excellent write-up. I think the conclusion page properly sums up a number of concerns I have with the A7 series, which has prevented me from investing in the system.

First, I know there's only so much that can be done about shutter noise, but there has to be a way of dampening the focal plane shutter mechanism used. For all the 'flappy mirror' nonsense of mirrorless fanboys, the A7 series has the loudest shutter I've ever heard.

Secondly - and this is only briefly addressed - is the lack of accessible lenses. I speak not so much to the lack of a native line-up, but rather the costliness. You can tell me all day long that the 35mm and 55mm primes are sharp as sharp can be, they're still both $800+, which is inhibitive. Nobody would pay $800 for a 35mm f/2.8 for a DSLR without being laughed at.

Lastly, as is well documented, the raw files. Just... why? I mean, I have my theories, but none of them make practical sense. This just needs fixing.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 31, 2015 at 22:41 UTC as 146th comment | 6 replies
In reply to:

ecube: I'm highly satisfied with my Samsung Tab.
For REAL computing, my MacBookPro has everything I need and more. Best thing with this combo, I don't have to worry about virus and both system are very stable.

My bigger problem with the OP is the insinuation that Android is stable and virus-free. Now *that* is laughable.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 31, 2015 at 22:07 UTC
In reply to:

ecube: I'm highly satisfied with my Samsung Tab.
For REAL computing, my MacBookPro has everything I need and more. Best thing with this combo, I don't have to worry about virus and both system are very stable.

Hi, I'm an educated Mac [and Windows, as well as Linux] user. Mac OS generally requires someone with admin access to willfully install software in order to become infected with anything, and the HowToGeek article basically says as much. The people who have done so are, unsurprisingly, a rather narrow spectrum of users, especially now that Apple has the AppStore.

There are few instances where a flaw in the OS lead to any worrisome compromise for the user [e.g.: HeartBleed], but these exploits also affected much larger, public-facing devices which would prove more problematic [in the case of HeartBleed, public servers for Gmail and FaceBook were also compromised].

Statistically, there are much fewer viruses and malware variants for Mac OS. Apple also tends to issue security updates to address exploits far more frequently than Microsoft does. Given the choice of Mac OS X and Windows for my personal systems, I choose Mac every time.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 31, 2015 at 22:06 UTC
On A Compact PEN: Olympus Stylus SH-2 Hands-on article (150 comments in total)
In reply to:

rallyfan: TL;DNR

For that much money it needs to be much thinner and it needs to make phone calls. Lollipop 5.0 supports raw. Olympus are behind. Fail.

Hey, I can cobble together random words too!

TL:DR

For that much money, it needs to have an EVF and allow me to remotely control my slow cooker. iOS 8.2 supports photos on the Apple Watch. Olympus makes me sad. Cheeseburgers.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 11, 2015 at 14:25 UTC
On A Compact PEN: Olympus Stylus SH-2 Hands-on article (150 comments in total)
In reply to:

BFHunt: No viewfinder? No deal. I'll stick with my Panasonic LF1 thanks. Plus the LF1 is f2.0 at the wide end, and has a larger sensor. I'm surprised the LF1 hasn't done better in the marketplace as it really has a nice set of specifications, and is very pocketable.

If you're surprised the LF1 hasn't done better, you may want to have a look at sales of compact cameras over the last few years.

Essentially, the LF1 is a merely-competent product lost in a sea of premium compact cameras with better image quality (think RX100) in an overall declining market segment.

I highly expect the SH-2 to deliver mostly the same market performance.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 11, 2015 at 14:23 UTC
On Nikon D5500 real-world samples article (129 comments in total)
In reply to:

Mssimo: Great camera, but where are the lenses? Nikon DX lens selection: 4 Primes, one f2.8 standard zoom and two wide zooms (all other are kit or super zoom lenses)

This segment will die next year. Full frames are almost hitting the magic $999 mark. Mirrorless have much better native lens selection and innovations.

Nikon has given up on DX, they are just "milking the cash cow till its bone dry" I would not invest in this system.

Papi61: "I'm sure it's also different between your D600 and another FF model with a different sensor... ;)"

I don't think you quite grasp what I mean by 'resolving capability'. There are several factors that come into play when placing a FX lens on a DX camera. Shifts in convergence (the cause of chromatic aberrations), diffraction, and transmission, all have an effect on resolution. Sometimes, these effects are minor when switching between formats, but often there are jarring differences. Even when you control for differences between sensor technology - such as pixel pitch or total resolution - or autofocus, there's a difference because each lens was designed for a specific sensor size.

Glibly stating that FX lenses can be placed on a DX camera, consequence free, is disingenuous. You're essentially ignoring the complex physics of how photography works and, in turn, doling out incorrect information.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 7, 2015 at 02:22 UTC
On Nikon D5500 real-world samples article (129 comments in total)
In reply to:

Mssimo: Great camera, but where are the lenses? Nikon DX lens selection: 4 Primes, one f2.8 standard zoom and two wide zooms (all other are kit or super zoom lenses)

This segment will die next year. Full frames are almost hitting the magic $999 mark. Mirrorless have much better native lens selection and innovations.

Nikon has given up on DX, they are just "milking the cash cow till its bone dry" I would not invest in this system.

"Guess what, you can use all the FF Nikkors you want with DX cameras."

True, however a number of FX lenses behave much differently when attached to a DX camera. I'm not referring to the dreaded 'equivalence' nonsense, but rather the difference in resolving capability. For example, the sharpness characteristic of my 70-300mm lens is different between my D7000 and D600. Same goes for my primes - I have to perform different levels of corrections for each lens depending on the body it's attached to.

Suffice to say, the OP has a point, despite their conclusion being overly dramatic: You would imagine that Nikon, with all of it's DX bodies available, ought to have more lenses optimized for the format. They don't, and that ought to be of concern.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 6, 2015 at 23:44 UTC
In reply to:

Juck: That slow zoom had better be a hell of a performer for $1000.

Forpetessake: Ljmac is correct. Reason? Physics.

The formulae for determining light-gathering capabilities of a lens says that, all things being equal between sensor technologies (which I know isn't a given, but, for the sake of this argument, it doesn't matter), if two lenses for two different formats have the same FoV, ISO setting, and shutter speed in camera, they will require the same aperture to get the same exposure.

The ONLY thing that changes is DoF.

I've owned/used multiple formats. I have used a light meter. No light meter asks, "What format are you using?" because that's not how physics works. Equivalence is a bull$#!t argument, and it needs to stop.

Further articles:
http://admiringlight.com/blog/full-frame-equivalence-and-why-it-doesnt-matter/

http://luminous-landscape.com/full-sized-vs-cropped-sensors/

https://photographylife.com/sensor-crop-factors-and-equivalence

Direct link | Posted on Mar 4, 2015 at 12:36 UTC
On Nikon D7200 First Impressions Review preview (855 comments in total)
In reply to:

whyamihere: I know all of the D7100 owners are moaning or just saying 'meh' to this camera, but, for me, this is a reason to upgrade from a D7000.

The deeper buffer essentially solves one of the biggest issues I've had with the D7x00 series. Even when not shooting in continuous burst mode, I found it easy to fill up the buffer on my D7000, and it has a deeper buffer than the D7100 (10 14-bit raw vs only 6). To my irritation, I kept coming up against this limit.

So long as the image quality looks reasonably good at ISO 3200, I'm buying one.

Brownie puts the finger on the issue quite well. Few people require 24MP, and I count myself as being part of the plurality that does not need it. I never had a problem with the AF on the D7000, so the improvements of the D7100 were a non-factor. The lack of OLPF and the somewhat minor improvements in high ISO performance weren't enough to make me pay out for a D7100. The absolutely tiny buffer killed any remaining interest I had.

This D7200, however, is worth a look, in my opinion. The buffer depth is an important factor for me. As I said above, so long as ISO 3200 is clean enough for my tastes (of course, it looked just fine to me on my D7000, so I can only imagine that it looks at least similar, if not somewhat better on a modern camera), I'll buy one. I don't need most of the other improvements, but that buffer depth alleviates one of the few complaints I had of the D7000.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 2, 2015 at 17:45 UTC
On Nikon D7200 First Impressions Review preview (855 comments in total)

I know all of the D7100 owners are moaning or just saying 'meh' to this camera, but, for me, this is a reason to upgrade from a D7000.

The deeper buffer essentially solves one of the biggest issues I've had with the D7x00 series. Even when not shooting in continuous burst mode, I found it easy to fill up the buffer on my D7000, and it has a deeper buffer than the D7100 (10 14-bit raw vs only 6). To my irritation, I kept coming up against this limit.

So long as the image quality looks reasonably good at ISO 3200, I'm buying one.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 2, 2015 at 12:51 UTC as 161st comment | 5 replies
In reply to:

Steve in GA: I’ve never really understood the fascination with the mirrorless concept. Other than offering a smaller body size than a DSLR with a comparable sensor, what advantages does mirrorless offer?

On the other hand, there seem to be a lot of mirrorless disadvantages when compared to DSLRs. For example,

a) DSLR technology is mature. It works, and it works well for almost any conceivable photographic need. Can mirrorless improve on this?

b) The existing catalog of lenses available for major brand DSLR’s is enormous. What can mirrorless possibly offer to compete with the hundreds of, e.g., Canon and Nikon lenses available for APS-C and full-frame DSLRs?

To me, a fairly advanced amateur who used to do pro wedding work back in film days, mirrorless seems like the answer to a question that no one asked.

I have to agree with both nekrosoft13 and Marty, here. There is something to be said about the more simple construction of a mirrorless camera. It's easier and cheaper to manufacture, easier to repair, and easier to program for improved performance. Sure, DSLR tech is 'mature', but, by proxy, so is most of the technology in a mirrorless camera because a lot of it is shared between the two camera types.

'Mirrorless seems like the answer to a question that no one asked' seems like the statement of a person who never bothered asking anybody else's opinion. I have a Sony NEX 5T for the times where my DSLR is simply overkill. I can also hand it to anybody else, expect them to operate it without prior instructions, and, regardless of who's handling the camera, I'll wind up with great photos. It's the best of many worlds.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 11, 2015 at 17:05 UTC
On Sigma goes wide with 24mm F1.4 DG HSM Art lens article (184 comments in total)
In reply to:

lcf80: Damn it, Sigma, why all the love for the FF, only? When we'll see some nice Art lens, but dedicated for u43, instead of dark DN? Olympus consistently refuses to create bright optics, Panasonic pricing for lens like 42.5 F1.2 is ridiculous, and there's a lot of space for high-quality bright lens with AF. Create something like 35mm F1.2 or F1.4 Art for u43 (dedicated, weather-sealed design), and I will buy it day one if priced sub $1k.

Nope, I just recognize someone who keeps moving the goal posts in an effort to win an argument they've already lost.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 10, 2015 at 22:42 UTC
On Sigma goes wide with 24mm F1.4 DG HSM Art lens article (184 comments in total)
In reply to:

lcf80: Damn it, Sigma, why all the love for the FF, only? When we'll see some nice Art lens, but dedicated for u43, instead of dark DN? Olympus consistently refuses to create bright optics, Panasonic pricing for lens like 42.5 F1.2 is ridiculous, and there's a lot of space for high-quality bright lens with AF. Create something like 35mm F1.2 or F1.4 Art for u43 (dedicated, weather-sealed design), and I will buy it day one if priced sub $1k.

Quezra: SNR didn't come into my calculation because it is irrelevant to the 'equivalence' argument. There's a reason I wrote a caveat that says, "All sensor technology being equal..." That's a playing field that may never be level, but the differences between minor sensor sizes of the same generation aren't *that* different.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 10, 2015 at 22:37 UTC
On Sigma goes wide with 24mm F1.4 DG HSM Art lens article (184 comments in total)
In reply to:

lcf80: Damn it, Sigma, why all the love for the FF, only? When we'll see some nice Art lens, but dedicated for u43, instead of dark DN? Olympus consistently refuses to create bright optics, Panasonic pricing for lens like 42.5 F1.2 is ridiculous, and there's a lot of space for high-quality bright lens with AF. Create something like 35mm F1.2 or F1.4 Art for u43 (dedicated, weather-sealed design), and I will buy it day one if priced sub $1k.

Like a friend of mine said, "There's a reason why they're called 'the laws of physics' and not the 'strong suggestions of physics'."

Plus, I just read a sampling of the Photography Science and Technology forum on what appears to be referred to as 'the E word'. The folks doing the arguing are, a.) People like me, who have facts and evidence, and, b.) People like quezra who go, "But, but..." before they rage-quit because they couldn't come up with a tangible argument to counteract centuries of scientific research.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 10, 2015 at 22:35 UTC
On Sigma goes wide with 24mm F1.4 DG HSM Art lens article (184 comments in total)
In reply to:

lcf80: Damn it, Sigma, why all the love for the FF, only? When we'll see some nice Art lens, but dedicated for u43, instead of dark DN? Olympus consistently refuses to create bright optics, Panasonic pricing for lens like 42.5 F1.2 is ridiculous, and there's a lot of space for high-quality bright lens with AF. Create something like 35mm F1.2 or F1.4 Art for u43 (dedicated, weather-sealed design), and I will buy it day one if priced sub $1k.

It's better than your 'I read one article on the subject' story. ;)

If you like articles on equivalence, here are some more:
https://photographylife.com/sensor-crop-factors-and-equivalence
http://www.luminous-landscape.com/essays/equivalent-lenses.shtml
http://admiringlight.com/blog/full-frame-equivalence-and-why-it-doesnt-matter/

They all pretty much reaffirm what I've already said.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 10, 2015 at 22:07 UTC
On Sigma goes wide with 24mm F1.4 DG HSM Art lens article (184 comments in total)
In reply to:

lcf80: Damn it, Sigma, why all the love for the FF, only? When we'll see some nice Art lens, but dedicated for u43, instead of dark DN? Olympus consistently refuses to create bright optics, Panasonic pricing for lens like 42.5 F1.2 is ridiculous, and there's a lot of space for high-quality bright lens with AF. Create something like 35mm F1.2 or F1.4 Art for u43 (dedicated, weather-sealed design), and I will buy it day one if priced sub $1k.

I've shot all three formats, myself, among others. I also have an entire department of physics professors to answer my questions, engineers who geek out over things like sensor advancements, a number of pro photographers and videographers as close personal friends, as well as my own varied career in technology and photography. If I don't know what I'm talking about, I know someone who does.

Nobody believes in this 'equivalence' nonsense beyond photography enthusiasts. The only practical effect between sensor size is a change in depth of field. Everything else comes down to the sensor technology (and the stack of glass that sits immediately in front of it for things like filter arrays) and lens variation (the sensor stack and the glass elements of the lens affect light transmission).

Unless you can present some amount of physics calculations that proves anything I've said otherwise...

Direct link | Posted on Feb 10, 2015 at 21:35 UTC
On Sigma goes wide with 24mm F1.4 DG HSM Art lens article (184 comments in total)
In reply to:

dwill23: SWEET! ANOTHER AWESOME LENS THAT CAN'T FOCUS!

Unless you have live-view focusing, these lenses are junk, for shooters like me who don't want to fuss with manual focus. Sure it's higher priced and blah blah blah so more pros would buy it and not whine about manual focusing, but also, if pros can't get the thing to focus, even with maxing out the focus adjustments with the USB dock AND CAMERA since it's so far off, then these lenses are really junk.

I've own the 35mm f1.4 and it was awesome, in hard-to-hold live-view focusing.
Then I made the mistake of buying the zoom for my non full frame camera (canon 70d) and what a mistake! Zoomed backward to canon lenses, horrible AF performance, etc. Zoom so slow you can't whip it zoom around for special effects. Terrible.

At least this one doesn't zoom (backward). Can't Sigma spend a tad more on the canon mount, of which they sell 3x more than the nikon mounts?
(According to the amount of reviews at such places at BHPhoto).

So, let me get this straight: You think this lens will be junk because the 35mm f/1.4 was awesome, but the unspecified zoom lens you got for a completely different camera was terrible somehow.

That's some sound logic, and I'm sure CEO Kazuo Yamaki will get right on it.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 10, 2015 at 21:10 UTC
Total: 122, showing: 1 – 20
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