whyamihere

whyamihere

Lives in United States Philadelphia, United States
Works as a Educational IT
Joined on Apr 8, 2012

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Total: 111, showing: 1 – 20
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On Nikon D7200 First Impressions Review preview (589 comments in total)
In reply to:

whyamihere: I know all of the D7100 owners are moaning or just saying 'meh' to this camera, but, for me, this is a reason to upgrade from a D7000.

The deeper buffer essentially solves one of the biggest issues I've had with the D7x00 series. Even when not shooting in continuous burst mode, I found it easy to fill up the buffer on my D7000, and it has a deeper buffer than the D7100 (10 14-bit raw vs only 6). To my irritation, I kept coming up against this limit.

So long as the image quality looks reasonably good at ISO 3200, I'm buying one.

Brownie puts the finger on the issue quite well. Few people require 24MP, and I count myself as being part of the plurality that does not need it. I never had a problem with the AF on the D7000, so the improvements of the D7100 were a non-factor. The lack of OLPF and the somewhat minor improvements in high ISO performance weren't enough to make me pay out for a D7100. The absolutely tiny buffer killed any remaining interest I had.

This D7200, however, is worth a look, in my opinion. The buffer depth is an important factor for me. As I said above, so long as ISO 3200 is clean enough for my tastes (of course, it looked just fine to me on my D7000, so I can only imagine that it looks at least similar, if not somewhat better on a modern camera), I'll buy one. I don't need most of the other improvements, but that buffer depth alleviates one of the few complaints I had of the D7000.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 2, 2015 at 17:45 UTC
On Nikon D7200 First Impressions Review preview (589 comments in total)

I know all of the D7100 owners are moaning or just saying 'meh' to this camera, but, for me, this is a reason to upgrade from a D7000.

The deeper buffer essentially solves one of the biggest issues I've had with the D7x00 series. Even when not shooting in continuous burst mode, I found it easy to fill up the buffer on my D7000, and it has a deeper buffer than the D7100 (10 14-bit raw vs only 6). To my irritation, I kept coming up against this limit.

So long as the image quality looks reasonably good at ISO 3200, I'm buying one.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 2, 2015 at 12:51 UTC as 96th comment | 5 replies
In reply to:

Steve in GA: I’ve never really understood the fascination with the mirrorless concept. Other than offering a smaller body size than a DSLR with a comparable sensor, what advantages does mirrorless offer?

On the other hand, there seem to be a lot of mirrorless disadvantages when compared to DSLRs. For example,

a) DSLR technology is mature. It works, and it works well for almost any conceivable photographic need. Can mirrorless improve on this?

b) The existing catalog of lenses available for major brand DSLR’s is enormous. What can mirrorless possibly offer to compete with the hundreds of, e.g., Canon and Nikon lenses available for APS-C and full-frame DSLRs?

To me, a fairly advanced amateur who used to do pro wedding work back in film days, mirrorless seems like the answer to a question that no one asked.

I have to agree with both nekrosoft13 and Marty, here. There is something to be said about the more simple construction of a mirrorless camera. It's easier and cheaper to manufacture, easier to repair, and easier to program for improved performance. Sure, DSLR tech is 'mature', but, by proxy, so is most of the technology in a mirrorless camera because a lot of it is shared between the two camera types.

'Mirrorless seems like the answer to a question that no one asked' seems like the statement of a person who never bothered asking anybody else's opinion. I have a Sony NEX 5T for the times where my DSLR is simply overkill. I can also hand it to anybody else, expect them to operate it without prior instructions, and, regardless of who's handling the camera, I'll wind up with great photos. It's the best of many worlds.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 11, 2015 at 17:05 UTC
On Sigma goes wide with 24mm F1.4 DG HSM Art lens article (184 comments in total)
In reply to:

lcf80: Damn it, Sigma, why all the love for the FF, only? When we'll see some nice Art lens, but dedicated for u43, instead of dark DN? Olympus consistently refuses to create bright optics, Panasonic pricing for lens like 42.5 F1.2 is ridiculous, and there's a lot of space for high-quality bright lens with AF. Create something like 35mm F1.2 or F1.4 Art for u43 (dedicated, weather-sealed design), and I will buy it day one if priced sub $1k.

Nope, I just recognize someone who keeps moving the goal posts in an effort to win an argument they've already lost.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 10, 2015 at 22:42 UTC
On Sigma goes wide with 24mm F1.4 DG HSM Art lens article (184 comments in total)
In reply to:

lcf80: Damn it, Sigma, why all the love for the FF, only? When we'll see some nice Art lens, but dedicated for u43, instead of dark DN? Olympus consistently refuses to create bright optics, Panasonic pricing for lens like 42.5 F1.2 is ridiculous, and there's a lot of space for high-quality bright lens with AF. Create something like 35mm F1.2 or F1.4 Art for u43 (dedicated, weather-sealed design), and I will buy it day one if priced sub $1k.

Quezra: SNR didn't come into my calculation because it is irrelevant to the 'equivalence' argument. There's a reason I wrote a caveat that says, "All sensor technology being equal..." That's a playing field that may never be level, but the differences between minor sensor sizes of the same generation aren't *that* different.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 10, 2015 at 22:37 UTC
On Sigma goes wide with 24mm F1.4 DG HSM Art lens article (184 comments in total)
In reply to:

lcf80: Damn it, Sigma, why all the love for the FF, only? When we'll see some nice Art lens, but dedicated for u43, instead of dark DN? Olympus consistently refuses to create bright optics, Panasonic pricing for lens like 42.5 F1.2 is ridiculous, and there's a lot of space for high-quality bright lens with AF. Create something like 35mm F1.2 or F1.4 Art for u43 (dedicated, weather-sealed design), and I will buy it day one if priced sub $1k.

Like a friend of mine said, "There's a reason why they're called 'the laws of physics' and not the 'strong suggestions of physics'."

Plus, I just read a sampling of the Photography Science and Technology forum on what appears to be referred to as 'the E word'. The folks doing the arguing are, a.) People like me, who have facts and evidence, and, b.) People like quezra who go, "But, but..." before they rage-quit because they couldn't come up with a tangible argument to counteract centuries of scientific research.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 10, 2015 at 22:35 UTC
On Sigma goes wide with 24mm F1.4 DG HSM Art lens article (184 comments in total)
In reply to:

lcf80: Damn it, Sigma, why all the love for the FF, only? When we'll see some nice Art lens, but dedicated for u43, instead of dark DN? Olympus consistently refuses to create bright optics, Panasonic pricing for lens like 42.5 F1.2 is ridiculous, and there's a lot of space for high-quality bright lens with AF. Create something like 35mm F1.2 or F1.4 Art for u43 (dedicated, weather-sealed design), and I will buy it day one if priced sub $1k.

It's better than your 'I read one article on the subject' story. ;)

If you like articles on equivalence, here are some more:
https://photographylife.com/sensor-crop-factors-and-equivalence
http://www.luminous-landscape.com/essays/equivalent-lenses.shtml
http://admiringlight.com/blog/full-frame-equivalence-and-why-it-doesnt-matter/

They all pretty much reaffirm what I've already said.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 10, 2015 at 22:07 UTC
On Sigma goes wide with 24mm F1.4 DG HSM Art lens article (184 comments in total)
In reply to:

lcf80: Damn it, Sigma, why all the love for the FF, only? When we'll see some nice Art lens, but dedicated for u43, instead of dark DN? Olympus consistently refuses to create bright optics, Panasonic pricing for lens like 42.5 F1.2 is ridiculous, and there's a lot of space for high-quality bright lens with AF. Create something like 35mm F1.2 or F1.4 Art for u43 (dedicated, weather-sealed design), and I will buy it day one if priced sub $1k.

I've shot all three formats, myself, among others. I also have an entire department of physics professors to answer my questions, engineers who geek out over things like sensor advancements, a number of pro photographers and videographers as close personal friends, as well as my own varied career in technology and photography. If I don't know what I'm talking about, I know someone who does.

Nobody believes in this 'equivalence' nonsense beyond photography enthusiasts. The only practical effect between sensor size is a change in depth of field. Everything else comes down to the sensor technology (and the stack of glass that sits immediately in front of it for things like filter arrays) and lens variation (the sensor stack and the glass elements of the lens affect light transmission).

Unless you can present some amount of physics calculations that proves anything I've said otherwise...

Direct link | Posted on Feb 10, 2015 at 21:35 UTC
On Sigma goes wide with 24mm F1.4 DG HSM Art lens article (184 comments in total)
In reply to:

dwill23: SWEET! ANOTHER AWESOME LENS THAT CAN'T FOCUS!

Unless you have live-view focusing, these lenses are junk, for shooters like me who don't want to fuss with manual focus. Sure it's higher priced and blah blah blah so more pros would buy it and not whine about manual focusing, but also, if pros can't get the thing to focus, even with maxing out the focus adjustments with the USB dock AND CAMERA since it's so far off, then these lenses are really junk.

I've own the 35mm f1.4 and it was awesome, in hard-to-hold live-view focusing.
Then I made the mistake of buying the zoom for my non full frame camera (canon 70d) and what a mistake! Zoomed backward to canon lenses, horrible AF performance, etc. Zoom so slow you can't whip it zoom around for special effects. Terrible.

At least this one doesn't zoom (backward). Can't Sigma spend a tad more on the canon mount, of which they sell 3x more than the nikon mounts?
(According to the amount of reviews at such places at BHPhoto).

So, let me get this straight: You think this lens will be junk because the 35mm f/1.4 was awesome, but the unspecified zoom lens you got for a completely different camera was terrible somehow.

That's some sound logic, and I'm sure CEO Kazuo Yamaki will get right on it.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 10, 2015 at 21:10 UTC
On Sigma goes wide with 24mm F1.4 DG HSM Art lens article (184 comments in total)
In reply to:

lcf80: Damn it, Sigma, why all the love for the FF, only? When we'll see some nice Art lens, but dedicated for u43, instead of dark DN? Olympus consistently refuses to create bright optics, Panasonic pricing for lens like 42.5 F1.2 is ridiculous, and there's a lot of space for high-quality bright lens with AF. Create something like 35mm F1.2 or F1.4 Art for u43 (dedicated, weather-sealed design), and I will buy it day one if priced sub $1k.

I think people misread my comment.

Quezra: You said, "50/1.8s on FF are much brighter than 25/1.8s on MFT because you can shoot easily at ISO 6400 and 12800 compared to 1600 and 3200." That is not true, as I have outlined. You replied to my statement with, "[Y]ou are arbitrarily holding depth of field equal." I didn't: "There's just more area to cover, and [full frame] gives, by proxy, a shallower depth of field."

Junk1: "Of course a larger sensor captures more light." Yes, because there is more area available. That does not increase the sensitivity of a sensor, however. If sensor technology were equal across all formats and pixel density remained constant, there would be no change in the sensitivity just because the format size changed. If you need ISO 1600 at f/1.8, 1/100 sec. on a 25mm lens for m43, you still need those same settings to get a similar image with a 50mm lens on a 35mm-frame sensor.

Again, this is physics. Also, read carefully and do research before replying.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 10, 2015 at 20:52 UTC
In reply to:

mpgxsvcd: I think I want all of these lenses. Bravo Fuji!

What mpgxsvcd said. As someone who shoots wildlife with a tele-zoom lens, I tend to use f/6.3, f/8, or even sometimes f/11 to ensure things are sharp and the entirety of my subject is in focus. I reckon sports photographers would be more worried about having a larger aperture range, but, somehow, I don't think that would be the target market for this lens.

Also, if this lens comes out at a reasonable enough price, I'd gladly ditch my DSLR for Fuji gear. The 16-55, 50-140, and the 100-400, would be all I'd ever need to do 98% of my photography.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 10, 2015 at 20:24 UTC
In reply to:

spontaneousservices: What does "R" stand for?

If I recall correctly (and someone who might know better can reply if I'm wrong), "R" is meant to indicate the presence of an aperture ring. For example, the XC lenses and the 27mm pancake do not have one, and there is no "R" in their naming.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 10, 2015 at 20:17 UTC
On Sigma goes wide with 24mm F1.4 DG HSM Art lens article (184 comments in total)
In reply to:

lcf80: Damn it, Sigma, why all the love for the FF, only? When we'll see some nice Art lens, but dedicated for u43, instead of dark DN? Olympus consistently refuses to create bright optics, Panasonic pricing for lens like 42.5 F1.2 is ridiculous, and there's a lot of space for high-quality bright lens with AF. Create something like 35mm F1.2 or F1.4 Art for u43 (dedicated, weather-sealed design), and I will buy it day one if priced sub $1k.

Quezra: In a word, no.

Given two different sensor sizes (35mm frame and Four Thirds) and two lenses with an equivalent field of view for each (50mm and 25mm, respectively), and if you let all other factors be equal, including aperture, shutter speed, and sensitivity of the sensor, you will get the exact same exposure with only a few inches' difference in depth of field.

Having a larger sensor does not magically give you more light gathering sensitivity, allowing you to reduce your ISO. There's just more area to cover, and it gives, by proxy, a shallower depth of field.

Physics does not conveniently change to fit your petty arguments about sensor size.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 10, 2015 at 12:31 UTC
On Hands-on with Canon's 'not-coming-to-USA' EOS M3 article (517 comments in total)
In reply to:

whyamihere: Dear Canon,

Cute camera.

Your PR material appears to be missing any mention of a lens worth giving a darn about.

Let us know when that happens.

PS: Ignore the angry Americans. We all know they just wanted the option for refusing to buy the camera.

1. Nice lens, but not a reason to buy an EOS-M.
2. See above, insert complaint about slow, variable aperture.
3. Funny man... oh, wait, you're being serious. How unfortunate.
4. Uh, sure.

So, where are the lenses I'm supposed to give a darn about? 2.5 years in, and what, 4 lenses? I mean, Sony FE has been around for a little over 1 year, and they have more lenses... and Sony fans complain endlessly about how there aren't enough native lenses.

Also: Who in their right mind puts an EF or EF-S lens on a tiny camera like an EOS-M? Talk about the opposite of compactness...

Direct link | Posted on Feb 6, 2015 at 22:22 UTC
On Hands-on with Canon's 'not-coming-to-USA' EOS M3 article (517 comments in total)

Dear Canon,

Cute camera.

Your PR material appears to be missing any mention of a lens worth giving a darn about.

Let us know when that happens.

PS: Ignore the angry Americans. We all know they just wanted the option for refusing to buy the camera.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 6, 2015 at 18:22 UTC as 89th comment | 11 replies
On Panasonic Lumix DMC-GF7 flips for selfies article (385 comments in total)
In reply to:

whyamihere: I like the adorable grumpiness and lack of awareness of the anti-selfie, anti-social media crowd. It's as if nobody in the history of the world ever photographed (or painted, or sketched) a self-portrait, published that picture in a public location for all to see (like an art gallery, or an online portfolio), or shared their photos with friends and family (photo albums, 35mm slide shows).

It's not narcissism. It's the same thing as before, just in a form you're all uncomfortable with because you don't know how it works.

First of all, thanks for self-implicating, Marty. That saves me lots of time and character space.

Apparently you haven't been subjected to enough 'vapid, uninspiring, and boring' self portraits that pass themselves off as 'fine art'. I suggest avoiding being involved in art history or becoming a gallery collections organizer. Lots of bland stuff out there.

I'd also argue that it's more than drunk teenaged girls who take selfies or people taking pictures of their latte who post to social media (your stereotype is behind the times). You should go to an amusement park and see how many families are taking selfies. A selfie capable camera just replaces the unwieldy camera on a tripod with a long cable release, self timer, or remote, or passing your expensive photographic investment off to a complete stranger. (Or, worse yet, figuring out who's not in the photo while they take the picture with their phone.)

In any case, who are you to judge what people photograph and how they display it?

Direct link | Posted on Jan 20, 2015 at 22:36 UTC
On Panasonic Lumix DMC-GF7 flips for selfies article (385 comments in total)

I like the adorable grumpiness and lack of awareness of the anti-selfie, anti-social media crowd. It's as if nobody in the history of the world ever photographed (or painted, or sketched) a self-portrait, published that picture in a public location for all to see (like an art gallery, or an online portfolio), or shared their photos with friends and family (photo albums, 35mm slide shows).

It's not narcissism. It's the same thing as before, just in a form you're all uncomfortable with because you don't know how it works.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 20, 2015 at 20:47 UTC as 55th comment | 12 replies
On Nikon D610 Review preview (352 comments in total)
In reply to:

BobFoster: A few years ago my friend and I each purchased D80's. The next year Nikon discontinued this model and stopped manufacturing batteries. Now we have cameras that are useless paper weights.
Nikon is a company that doesn't give a ....... about it's customers. They do this on purpose so as to make you buy the next model over and over again.

I know how you feel, Bob. I was midway through a photoshoot when Nikon officially discontinued the D7000. My camera instantly went from a working photographic device to a completely useless lump of plastic, mag-alloy, and silicon. I had to tell the model to go home because I had to upgrade to a new camera.

Damn you, Nikon!

Direct link | Posted on Jan 20, 2015 at 14:34 UTC
On Nikon D610 Review preview (352 comments in total)
In reply to:

farhadvm: hi dear folks i wonder why the iso performance and image quality is much lower than canon 6D according to what im seeing in the iso tests here??? im a nikon user but this confuses me why Nikon D610 wins over Canon 6D in image quality compare. i wanna start astrophotography so should i change to canon?

Not sure what part of the scene you're looking at that makes you think the Canon 6D is magnificently better than the Nikon D610. Looking at the RAW files, they're both neck-and-neck through ISO 6400, with neither really having a sizable advantage.

If you shoot Nikon now, I don't see enough difference here to warrant changing out hundreds - if not thousands - of dollars of equipment just to obtain an absolutely tiny difference in image quality. There are plenty of photographers who successfully use older, and technically 'inferior' cameras to do astrophotography.

I think you'll be fine with what you have.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 20, 2015 at 14:23 UTC
On Fujifilm announces XF 16-55mm F2.8 R LM WR lens article (295 comments in total)
In reply to:

whyamihere: The most popular complaints appear to be:

"It's heavy and big!" I'm not sure what you were expecting out of a f/2.8 zoom made mostly of metal and glass. It's about the same size and weight as most other f/2.8 APS-C zooms out there.

"If I attach this lens to my Fuji camera, it's no longer the ultimate travel camera!" Unless you lost all of your other lenses, you can still mount them to your camera when you travel.

"It has no IS!" Most zooms of this type don't, either.

"But the Canon and Samsung lenses have IS!" Those lenses also have inconsistent optics. Which is more important to you: IQ or IS?

"It's overpriced!" Except it costs roughly the same as the competition.

I don't own Fuji gear, but, come on, these arguments are pretty weak.

Just another Canon shooter: Sure I can. There's mathematical formulas that explain how 'equivalency' only means something to DoF. If two lenses for different formats have the same FoV (85mm on 35mm, and 56mm on APS-C), and they have equal apertures relative to the focal length (f/1.2), as well as the same shutter speed and sensitivity, you will invariably get the same exposure. The lone exception would be DoF. Speaking of...

Nerd2: If we assume the specs for each lens are correct and we do the math based off of those measurements, the total DoF difference should be a whopping 0.4 inches. Oooh, how different!

Cheng Bao: My point is equivalent lenses for other formats and systems do not feature IS, and counting IBIS as lens IS is a false equivalency. If Canikon can get away with selling a 24-70mm f/2.8 for $2,000 without IS, we can forgive Fuji for not including it at $1,200. If a pro can make do without it, I'm sure you can learn to do so, as well.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 7, 2015 at 03:59 UTC
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