tem00

tem00

Lives in United States FL, United States
Joined on Jun 21, 2010

Comments

Total: 16, showing: 1 – 16
On Nokia sells its headquarters post (6 comments in total)

Well, seems releasing an incredible product, the Lumia 920, only on ATT and GSM networks wasn't a real good idea. I would have bought one in a second if was released on my carrier Sprint, or even another CDMA.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 5, 2012 at 03:20 UTC as 4th comment
In reply to:

40daystogo: I am a zone system user from darkroom-chemical days, but someone can correct me if I'm wrong, but it seems to me that the provision of real-time histograms on the rear LCD of the DSLR or high-end premium compact gets me there most of the time, in terms of not over-exposing the highlights, or not under-exposing the shadows excessively. Whilst it may not be precise in terms of getting Zone VI precisely on Zone VI, the histograms serve the same end goal of giving me a tool for not blowing out highlight or shadow detail. Also, the histogram, plus the ability to roughly check exposure on the LCD act as two tools that make the Zone system procedure only really useful in ultra-precise photos where you have time to go through the mental steps, as opposed to a fast-changing situation that requires fast shooting.

I too used the zone system, in the 80's, but i dont see the application in digital where you tweak everything in real time.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 8, 2012 at 14:07 UTC
On Exhibition Review: 8x10 By Impossible article (85 comments in total)
In reply to:

GordonAtWork: I wish someone would recreate Kodachrome 25 or 64 or Ektachrome 200. these were my film choices back in the day. A Cibachrome print will outlast ANY modern day inkjet/dye transfer/laser print etc and the quality of the prints surpasses anything printable today.
Digital has been the evolutionary step in photgraphy but Instagram isn't really the "ooh I like that" process.

Man, I forgot all about Cibachrome. It was great stuff.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 3, 2012 at 00:50 UTC
On Corel releases Service Pack 1.0.1 for AfterShot Pro article (41 comments in total)

for Samsung NX200 users, do not update firmware. The new file still won't read properly with this service pack. Unfortunately, you cant re-flash camera to older version either.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 17, 2012 at 21:13 UTC as 17th comment
In reply to:

professor4321: From Imaging Resource,
Overexposure "Blooming"
A final limitation of CCD sensors is their reaction to severe illumination overloads. This is the reason for including a shiny pot lid in the Dave Box targets on the Imaging Resource website, because it reflects light sources back into the camera lens. In the face of extremely high light overloads, some CCDs will "leak" charge from the overexposed elements into adjacent cells. This phenomenon is called blooming, and various methods are employed to prevent it. It most frequently shows itself as a colored fringe around specular (shiny) highlights. Frequently, the sensor will bloom differently in each of the red, green or blue channels, producing the colored fringes where one channel has bloomed more than the others. The impact of this for your particular work will depend on its nature. If you intend to photograph a lot of chromed auto parts, blooming could be a big problem. It would be a complete non-issue in photos of bath towels.

still useful. why dont u leave it? Who knows, Fuji might have some kind of EXR/Super CCD EXR hybrid thing going on here.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 20, 2012 at 17:25 UTC
In reply to:

professor4321: From Imaging Resource,
Overexposure "Blooming"
A final limitation of CCD sensors is their reaction to severe illumination overloads. This is the reason for including a shiny pot lid in the Dave Box targets on the Imaging Resource website, because it reflects light sources back into the camera lens. In the face of extremely high light overloads, some CCDs will "leak" charge from the overexposed elements into adjacent cells. This phenomenon is called blooming, and various methods are employed to prevent it. It most frequently shows itself as a colored fringe around specular (shiny) highlights. Frequently, the sensor will bloom differently in each of the red, green or blue channels, producing the colored fringes where one channel has bloomed more than the others. The impact of this for your particular work will depend on its nature. If you intend to photograph a lot of chromed auto parts, blooming could be a big problem. It would be a complete non-issue in photos of bath towels.

X10 is CMOS, not CCD

Direct link | Posted on Feb 20, 2012 at 17:06 UTC

Kinda glad it failed for me, as a former Fuji fan, I would have never really tried the Nikon V1 if the X10 had worked out. It's a magnitude above the X10 in so many areas. Sometimes things work out for the best.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 18, 2012 at 19:46 UTC as 113th comment
In reply to:

newe: Maybe they will do better with the Fuji S6...I heard it is slated for release this year.

The customers for the S6 would be a lot of X10 type buyers. After getting stung on an X10, I doubt many would give Fuji another shot.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 18, 2012 at 18:56 UTC

I guess if I had exceeded my 30 day return period, I would find reasons to say orbs don't bother me. It's human nature to do that.

But I bet most would not keep the camera after spending $600 if they had the option get a refund.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 18, 2012 at 16:54 UTC as 124th comment

You don't need to shoot rare, long exposure, night scenes, to get ugly orbs.

Just shoot around a lake, pool, river, sea, with the sun shining, at an ISO appropriate for outdoors (100-400), and they will most likely ruin your image.

I have a P7000, DP!, DP2, F600EXR, and they do NOT produce orbs in same situation.

Maybe if you live up North or where the sun is not intense most of the year, you may be OK, but otherwise look out.

Really loved the camera's feel, but glad it was just a loaner.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 18, 2012 at 08:15 UTC as 164th comment
On IMG_0340 photo in dpreview review samples's photo gallery (5 comments in total)

is it just me, or do many of these look very soft for such a big sensor?

Direct link | Posted on Jan 16, 2012 at 20:08 UTC as 2nd comment | 3 replies
On Mirrorless Cameras: A Primer article (183 comments in total)
In reply to:

tem00: Sensor size has nothing to do with it. It's the technolgy in the sensor and the relationship with the lens. In years ahead, a 4x3mm sensor will most likely be resolving 12mp very well. Lenses designed to use it will give all the benefits you think you need in large sensors today.

You all make some good valid points. In the 80's I used Arri and Panavision. The DP's struggled to get more DOF in most situations with that equipment, so I find it amusing this generation gets turned on by blurry disk in the background. It's a matter of taste I suppose.

I don't have a Ph.D. But know optics, lasers, and photonics, as now we manufacture H.O.E.'s (holographic optical elements) and optical films for tech. I think it is premature to nay a product because the specs indicate a small sensor.

Technology improves and innovation has us rethinking the state of the art. I was just predicting that near future cameras will blow the lid off most ideas today. Probably even capture some wavefront info like Lytro too.

I also remember in the 90's my cousin, who held a PhD in computer technology, saying the 486 66mhz chip they were developing was pushing the limit of any computer speed possible and didn't think it would EVER be possible to go faster due to the "physics".

Direct link | Posted on Dec 22, 2011 at 14:55 UTC
On Mirrorless Cameras: A Primer article (183 comments in total)
In reply to:

tem00: Sensor size has nothing to do with it. It's the technolgy in the sensor and the relationship with the lens. In years ahead, a 4x3mm sensor will most likely be resolving 12mp very well. Lenses designed to use it will give all the benefits you think you need in large sensors today.

No, I meant 4mm by 3mm, you read right. One micron per pixel for 12 megapixels. Visible light wavelength is centered ~.5 microns and can potentially be focused within 1 micron no problem, with good design and technique of course.
Perhaps if your physics were learned from reading photo blogs you would disagree, because I would like to know what law you are referring to? Unless you think photons are much larger than they are. The DOF calculations all the photo experts quote are based on charts made for spherical lens design of the 1930's. Besides, shallow DOF, is a relic of the slow film days and today there is no use for it, except to imitate a look of a bygone age. Sort of like plugins that simulate grain. Any 9th grader with a DSLR and fast lens can create it. Besides, it usually just shows the limitations of the photographer's skill to compose a image with what's there. Do you really think photons change properties when landing on a sensor 20mm bigger? Its all lens.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 20, 2011 at 03:20 UTC
On Mirrorless Cameras: A Primer article (183 comments in total)

Sensor size has nothing to do with it. It's the technolgy in the sensor and the relationship with the lens. In years ahead, a 4x3mm sensor will most likely be resolving 12mp very well. Lenses designed to use it will give all the benefits you think you need in large sensors today.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 18, 2011 at 18:44 UTC as 38th comment | 7 replies
On Mirrorless Cameras: A Primer article (183 comments in total)

I found the Nikon V1 blended the best of SLR and m4/3. Focus speed exceeded anything I have tried and the IQ is exceptional, especially raw in NX2. If you are past 40, a good EVF is great when in low light or when you don't want to wear reading glasses. The quality of these smaller cameras is there.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 18, 2011 at 17:54 UTC as 40th comment
On Buyer's Guide: Enthusiast raw-shooting compact cameras article (286 comments in total)

Regarding DR, if you shoot the p7100 with "Active" D-Lighting, in RAW, and develop with Nikon's Capture NX2, you will see a tremendous benefit, perhaps equaling or exceeding Fuji's EXR. I only have a F600EXR, and love it, but I do have a p7000. I have been on the fence about buying x10 for EXR, and after experimenting with the P7000 D-lighting (you turn on Active prior, you cannot activate it after you made the shot) and NX2, I don't see much need.

BTW
If you shoot Nikon RAW, you really need to use NX2. After you learn the features, it will blow you away. All of your edits, versions of edits, and control points, saved in the RAW file without a database, and available for later work is awesome. D-lighting control, from camera settings menu in NX2 allows for very natural DR boost. If you don't like the look, you can always turn it off, but it must be enabled at shot time for the option later. Confusing I know. Also, if you use NX2, try the presentation mode.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 16, 2011 at 17:02 UTC as 57th comment | 1 reply
Total: 16, showing: 1 – 16