wb2trf

wb2trf

Lives in United States United States
Joined on May 3, 2011

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Total: 73, showing: 1 – 20
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On Apple is on camera-engineer hiring spree post (87 comments in total)
In reply to:

wb2trf: Apple's rewarded history is to think big. In this case the entire camera industry is geriatric and ready to be knocked over. Phone cams are taking the low end and mirrorless (all-electronic cameras after eshutters reach the high end) will knock out dslrs. Further, China manufacturing with Apple design can knock out Japanese, as it has in so many other areas. So, they could be looking to make a dedicated imaging peripheral, ie. a camera. Make it software e-compatible with all lenses, using merely mechanical couplers, if necessary. Lastly, the big untapped factor in camera design now is 3rd party software apps inside the camera. A few camera companies have timidly hinted in that direction, but the old guard camera makers are clueless about this. That is the big apple ready to be grabbed. So, I say , think big Apple, the camera industry is yours for the asking.

Mario G, I'm not sure if you seriously couldn't understand what I was saying, which I grant could have been clearer, but I thought was clear enough. What was intended was that it be fully compatible with all lenses. This requires a mechanical coupling, but not an optically active coupling if the flange to sensor distance is very short. It also requires software that provides compatibility, and of course, electrical contact compatibility.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 18, 2014 at 00:25 UTC
On Apple is on camera-engineer hiring spree post (87 comments in total)

Apple's rewarded history is to think big. In this case the entire camera industry is geriatric and ready to be knocked over. Phone cams are taking the low end and mirrorless (all-electronic cameras after eshutters reach the high end) will knock out dslrs. Further, China manufacturing with Apple design can knock out Japanese, as it has in so many other areas. So, they could be looking to make a dedicated imaging peripheral, ie. a camera. Make it software e-compatible with all lenses, using merely mechanical couplers, if necessary. Lastly, the big untapped factor in camera design now is 3rd party software apps inside the camera. A few camera companies have timidly hinted in that direction, but the old guard camera makers are clueless about this. That is the big apple ready to be grabbed. So, I say , think big Apple, the camera industry is yours for the asking.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 14, 2014 at 14:22 UTC as 18th comment | 3 replies
On Am I missing something here? article (564 comments in total)

The 1 System was an outcome of an internal battle between Nikon marketing and Nikon engineering in which marketing decisively won. At the time the 1 was planned, they thought they could just confuse the mirrorless market as a way of damaging it and exploiting it while protecting dslr sales. "Nikon says mirrorless is not about serious photography" is the message the 1 was designed to deliver. Unfortunately this was a very bad idea.

Mirrorless, entirely on its own, is relentless as a technology. It lowers cost for equivalent IQ. Ultimately deadly. Sony, by a factor of the 2 the largest sensor maker, is going to drive it until there is nothing left but phone cams and mirrorless.

Unlike the far more diversified Canon, Nikon can't afford a "portfolio" approach of treating cameras as a "dis-invest" cash cow. So, the 1 System is going to become a landmark mistake for Nikon: here Nikon bet on marketing when they should have had engineering build the best mirrorless possible. RIP

Direct link | Posted on Mar 13, 2014 at 05:04 UTC as 200th comment | 3 replies
On Nikon 1 V3: a quick summary article (582 comments in total)

The price just makes no sense. Why would anyone pay $1200 for a 1" sensor when they can get APS-C in the A6000 for $800. Would anyone lose that much sensor IQ to go from 11fps A6000 with AF (and even more PD points) to 20fps.

The only thing that makes any sense here is making a 70-300mm OIS lens for the system. That lens might be very nice for birding. But, again the price/IQ question is at best a "maybe" at $999.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 13, 2014 at 04:44 UTC as 227th comment | 7 replies

If one cares about Canon in the camera market, there is nothing here that is encouraging. From external evidence it appears that Canon had decided that, for a diversified company such as they are, it is time to "harvest" in the camera market, ie. treat it as a slowly shrinking cash cow not worth investing in. Given the current market dynamics this would be a classic prescription that a management consultant, internal or external, might make. Of course such portfolio strategies can never be discussed inside the market that is being treated as a cash cow, such as in this interview. In fact, however, the pattern of this interview is about what I would expect if this "milking" was indeed the Canon strategy, as I guess that it is.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 3, 2014 at 22:05 UTC as 72nd comment

When business is headed down for strategic reasons companies always underestimate how fast it will go down and how low it will go. In this case the strategic issues are that phone cams are hurting all segments, but particuarly P&S, and mirrorless is slowly hurting dslrs. The mirrorless status is similar to that with cell phones a few years back: the adverse impact of mirrorless on Canikon is just starting. I'd expect to see several marginal players per year exit the business over the next two years, companies like Olympus, Panasonic, Rikoh. Then Nikon is most vulnerable: they are most dependent on cameras, they source their chips from their competitor (Sony) and they are in denial about the impact of mirrorless, as shown by the Nikon 1 being a "try to confuse the market" strategy. Canon looks like they have already deemphasized camera development, about 2 years ago, and are pursuing a "milking market share" strategy. That's smart business.
All in all, expect winnowing.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 24, 2014 at 23:43 UTC as 61st comment | 3 replies
On Sony a6000 First Impressions Review preview (604 comments in total)
In reply to:

km25: 24MPs is a little high for APS-C, I would rather give up a few MPs for better low light use. The 24MP is fine for the mass market, but I think most serious photographer would rather a better balance, leaving 24MP for FF. I fell as if 16-20MP is best for APS-C in all the noise tests I have seen.

The idea that fewer pixels is better, always, is just a myth, perpetuated as a calling card for dpr pseudo-cognoscenti.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 13, 2014 at 00:47 UTC
On Sony a6000 First Impressions Review preview (604 comments in total)

If the focus on this is really as fast as Sony says, and I have no reason to doubt it, that is huge. Nikon got superfast focus with the 1, but that is a quite small sensor by comparison. Doing that with 24mp APS-C is a complete game changer. The only question in my mind is whether to grab this or wait for the 7000, if there is going to be one.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 12, 2014 at 04:45 UTC as 150th comment | 2 replies
On Sony a7R teardown! Roger Cicala gets his hands dirty news story (136 comments in total)

Although the story naturally compares complexity of this camera to high end dslr's, the simplicity message is most relevant in the low end market. A tear down of the A3000 vs the d3200 would show how brutal is the problem for dslrs in the high volume low margin end of the market. Fundamentally all dslrs are of similar manufacturing complexity. I'll bet that the contribution to overheads from the sale of each A3000 at $369 is 2x that of the entry dslrs that it competes with, and the image quality is as good or better.

Nikon's situation is particularly untenable unless they get help from some external factor: they're wedded to an obsolete electo-mechanical design and they are dependent on Sony for their best sensors. Whatever they do, Sony can match IQ in higher margin lower cost product. They need to offer a professional mirrorless camera soon. I think they will do it, but maybe not soon enough.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 30, 2014 at 22:21 UTC as 25th comment | 5 replies
On Sony a7R teardown! Roger Cicala gets his hands dirty news story (136 comments in total)
In reply to:

DH2000: While I am admiring Sony’s engineering marvels. It occurs to me that DPReview staff may have a different take. Following summary may appear in the upcoming A7r review:

“Despite being a high-end, full-frame camera (and one which uses the same sensor as the Nikon D600/D610 and Canon’s 6D), the company's latest casing, dubbed Bionz C for reasons that presumably made sense to someone, uses only two different screw sizes. A typical Nikon or Canon camera has four to seven different screw sizes by this point. We are a little bit surprised by Sony’s strategy here, as a7r suffers from many of the same issues as Sony's compact cameras. These issues include a far too compact layout, to the point that one particular screw is neither visible nor easily reachable. While this may not be a problem for some photographers, the aforementioned issues will become more noticeable if you 'push' the boundary of the case. “

No doubt. How did you get that text ahead of time?

Direct link | Posted on Jan 30, 2014 at 22:03 UTC
On Olympus announces Stylus SP-100 superzoom with dot-sight news story (89 comments in total)

This is potentially a very interesting camera for those, like me, who shoot birds in flight with a superzoom. The problem of spotting and tracking at zoom levels above 800 is one of the biggest problems. If this dot sight works, it could make a big difference. Unfortunately there are a lot of small factors that affect usability. For example, the Canon SX50 blacks out the vf/lcd during high speed burst shooting, which is a killer for shooting while tracking. Image quality of course is another. It will be interesting to learn more.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 29, 2014 at 21:05 UTC as 9th comment
On Using third-party lenses on Sony Cyber-shot a7 / a7R article (469 comments in total)
In reply to:

wb2trf: What a dumb review. There are a few reasonable criticisms, but there is this overall tone of snarkyness that is merely a gloss on stupidity. Start here: "despite the best efforts of Sony's UX designers to bury the relevant option at the end of page three in the custom setting tab of the menu setting. 'Release w/o Lens: Enable'" Now lets think for one minute. Since every option has to go somewhere something must be at the bottom. Since there is never a need to reverse this decision, you literally set it once for the life of the camera, where should it be? At the bottom of course.
Next, we have the crazy complaints in the paragraph that begins, "I can't remember the last time I used shutter priority (I'm an aperture priority kind of guy)" This paragraph is completely idiotic in its entirety. He writes as if he is disappointed that aperture priority isn't useful. Of course not! Secondly the choice of 1/60th can't be "biased in firmware" as there is no information to use. Dumb.

"Aperture priority" is a assertion of control over aperture in a camera that controls aperture priority electronically. It is not an observation of the fact that aperture control is on the lens for an MF. No need to tell the camera it can't control aperture! There is therefore absolutely no reason to use aperture priority with a manual lens. You don't seem to understand that. The modes that make sense to use, independent of brand of camera, are P, to give you auto shutter, or S (with or without auto ISO) if you want to assert a shutter speed. You need to put down your AF habits "I'm an A man" and think. Your gripe is about the P program for the shutter. You think that instead of using S you should be able to set a minimum shutter that can float upwards under P control in bright conditions. That's a nice feature idea that has nothing to do with manual lenses. Hand shake is only one half of the reason to set shutter. Subject movement must be handled using S. So is it a big deal?

Direct link | Posted on Jan 22, 2014 at 04:16 UTC
On Using third-party lenses on Sony Cyber-shot a7 / a7R article (469 comments in total)

"Certainly, for 50mm lenses or longer, you'll need a steady hand to really be able to get a clear view of what's sharp and what isn't. A lower magnification option would be more user-friendly " This is his complaint about 7.2 as the minimum magnification for manual focus assist. The problem I have is that 7.2 often isn't enough to hit the focus right! I use 14x a lot, and have no problem hand holding up to 200mm. I wouldn't want less than 7 as the starting point. I can't really question that he may have shaky hands, but I don't think I"m particularly skilled in this area. I think his suggestion is a bad one.

There is no question that nailing critical focus, particularly if you want, or must accept, very shallow dof, is difficult. It always has been. If you must work quickly or anything is moving it really makes you appreciate AF. A lot of practice is a big help, as it has been since these old lenses were first made. There is no way that I know around that.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 21, 2014 at 23:16 UTC as 131st comment
On Using third-party lenses on Sony Cyber-shot a7 / a7R article (469 comments in total)
In reply to:

wb2trf: What a dumb review. There are a few reasonable criticisms, but there is this overall tone of snarkyness that is merely a gloss on stupidity. Start here: "despite the best efforts of Sony's UX designers to bury the relevant option at the end of page three in the custom setting tab of the menu setting. 'Release w/o Lens: Enable'" Now lets think for one minute. Since every option has to go somewhere something must be at the bottom. Since there is never a need to reverse this decision, you literally set it once for the life of the camera, where should it be? At the bottom of course.
Next, we have the crazy complaints in the paragraph that begins, "I can't remember the last time I used shutter priority (I'm an aperture priority kind of guy)" This paragraph is completely idiotic in its entirety. He writes as if he is disappointed that aperture priority isn't useful. Of course not! Secondly the choice of 1/60th can't be "biased in firmware" as there is no information to use. Dumb.

"Aperture Priority" mode is not an acknowledgement by the user that the aperture can only be set on the lens ring. Such acknowledgment is pointless. It is an assertion of control over the aperture when aperture is controlled through the camera, which it can't be for a manual aperture lens. It is therefore inherently a useless mode with a manual aperture lens. That has nothing to do with Sony. We don't need self-proclaimed "aperture priority guys" doing reviews of manual aperture lens use, we need people who think about what it means to use a manual aperture lens on a modern camera.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 21, 2014 at 22:14 UTC
On Using third-party lenses on Sony Cyber-shot a7 / a7R article (469 comments in total)

What a dumb review. There are a few reasonable criticisms, but there is this overall tone of snarkyness that is merely a gloss on stupidity. Start here: "despite the best efforts of Sony's UX designers to bury the relevant option at the end of page three in the custom setting tab of the menu setting. 'Release w/o Lens: Enable'" Now lets think for one minute. Since every option has to go somewhere something must be at the bottom. Since there is never a need to reverse this decision, you literally set it once for the life of the camera, where should it be? At the bottom of course.
Next, we have the crazy complaints in the paragraph that begins, "I can't remember the last time I used shutter priority (I'm an aperture priority kind of guy)" This paragraph is completely idiotic in its entirety. He writes as if he is disappointed that aperture priority isn't useful. Of course not! Secondly the choice of 1/60th can't be "biased in firmware" as there is no information to use. Dumb.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 21, 2014 at 21:17 UTC as 162nd comment | 12 replies
On Sony A3000 preview (678 comments in total)

This is the beginning of the real payout of mirrorless cameras, the cost and IQ hammer on the dslr. A dslr line does not want to get into a price war with this thing, or its future relatives, because this has got to be so much cheaper to make. This, and all of its future relatives, can offer better image quality at far lower cost of manufacture than dslrs. My guess would be that we will see the low end of the dslr price range drift upwards over the next several years as the other makers realize that the handwriting is on the wall and they can only fight this new class of camera with mirrorless cameras that are cheaper to make. I suspect if you take the Nex to EOS-M time gap and subtract a few months you will find Canon and Nikon versions of this in the market replacing their low end dlsrs.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 27, 2013 at 15:14 UTC as 137th comment
On Sony A3000 preview (678 comments in total)
In reply to:

jimr: I think Dpreview has it totally wrong.
Excellent sensor.
MSRP $399 with kit lens.
The A3000 will fly off the shelves no matter what the LCD/EVF resolution. The fact that it has both is an asset!

Yes the tone of the dpr article is all wrong. However dpr, like photographic equipment collectors who live on this site, does not deeply like change, and this is a big change. If you look at the dpr story on the first Nex cameras (3&5) and compare that to the first story on the 5N, you will see that the biggest change was not the cameras but merely the fact that dpr writers had become accustomed to the idea of the Nex. They hated the first and loved the second more than any change in the cameras would possibly justify.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 27, 2013 at 14:57 UTC
On 5 Reasons why I haven't used my DSLR for months article (590 comments in total)
In reply to:

Lee Jay: So, the main reason is, because you don't shoot a lot of shots in difficult conditions, like the Spitfire shot. Fine for you. I shoot about 80% of my shots in conditions in which none of the cameras mentioned would have any chance of getting the shot.

True there are a few people who shoot mostly in situations in which a dslr is better. I think however that the situations in which it is worse than the alternatives are far more common, the kind which are noted in the story. We are faced with a situation in which dslrs will go the way of view cameras, specialty products necessary and superior for a small set of situations and worse for most.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 31, 2013 at 22:02 UTC
On Just posted: Sony Alpha NEX-6 Review news story (330 comments in total)
In reply to:

Abaregi: EOS M has touch, 6D does not. What is the price difference there?

As a manual shooter I have never used it on my 5R but i guess it would be nice for AF. I have never used that though (Legacy shooter)

If i start with AF lenses then i might appreciate the touch on my 5R but so far i have never used or missed it.

No it certainly does not require hand off grip. I use the touch shutter with my thumb. Right thumb for landscape and left for portrait. The 5R is so small, it isn't even a stretch. One common alternative when you lack touch shutter does involve moving the camera, to choose a focus point in the scene, half press to lock, and reframe. That is less stable and much slower.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 28, 2013 at 16:46 UTC
On Just posted: Sony Alpha NEX-6 Review news story (330 comments in total)
In reply to:

S.A.: heh so many negative comments as usual.... I've owned all Nikon and Sony. Nikon DSLRs and Sony whatevers... And this NEX 6 is the closest I've come to a do it all camera. As with all mirrorless, the autofocus leaves something to be diesired, but otherwise it's a swiss army knife of cameras. First thing I did was sell the lens. Would rather use primes and already had the 18-55.
Crying about the menus is pointless. The quick navi and the fn button take care of that. Hardly any need to go into menus. Love that I an use my triggers with the hot shoe. Love the wireless. I shoot in my little studio and just hit send to computer. Love it. WONDERFUL CAMERA!
Touchscreen lol. Use your cell phone then. No real advantage imho. Actually it seems a handicap if you ask me. Turned it off on the 5n after a few weeks. However, I can see no reason why they couldn't have included it for the gadget crowd. So ok, minus half a percentage point.

It is not possible to rationally justify the lack of touch screen unless it is based on manufacturer's cost savings.

The camera switches dynamically from lcd to viewfinder and turns off the touchscreen instantly as it does so. There is no possibility of accidental touching when using the viewfinder.

The emotional issue here about touch screen is that it is new. Things that are new are thought by old photographers to be "not serious" but what this really reflects is a desire for group approval among the stodgy, by disparaging that which was not present on old cameras.
The fact is that under some circumstances touch is very good for manual focus enlargement centering, for subject selection and shutter in one action, and, sometimes, for menu handling. It is never bad to have it available. In photography anything that is good sometimes is good period, because conditions always vary.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 28, 2013 at 03:30 UTC
Total: 73, showing: 1 – 20
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