Doug Pardee

Doug Pardee

Lives in United States Wilmington, NC, United States
Joined on May 28, 2005

Comments

Total: 183, showing: 1 – 20
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On article Fujifilm X-T10 Review (512 comments in total)

Going simply from the camera's manual, I believe the following is misleading: "In my limiting testing of the X-T10's subject tracking capabilities across the frame using AF-C [a bunch of stuff] Furthermore, when the camera is set to Wide/Tracking, it only uses contrast detect AF. "

According to the manual, the contrast-detect-only AF is for AF-S, Wide mode. As far as I can tell, in AF-C (Tracking mode) the phase-detect sensors are still used.

Notably, in CH burst mode, *only* the phase-detect sensors are used. That significantly limits the area of the viewfinder that the subject can be tracked across during a high-speed burst.

Link | Posted on May 2, 2016 at 19:47 UTC as 4th comment
In reply to:

David Hull: This seems like a great thing but I wonder what it means for the future of the applications?

I had my editing computer die a couple months ago and I e-mailed NIK to see how they handled things since I was an owner and needed to re-install. I couldn't see where to put the codes in in the latest version. The lady I was in contact with just sent me a link to download -- no codes necessary.

Hopefully they will keep investing in these apps.

Robert: I said there was no *official* support for PSE 14. There have been reports of trouble with using Nik on PSE 14 on Macs.

I also said there was no *official* support for Windows 10. The reports I've seen indicate that it seems to work fine. But if any problems crop up in the future, I wouldn't count on Google to fix them.

My point was that by now, if Google was planning on continuing support of the Nik products, they would have official support for Win 10 and PSE 14. The fact that they don't is a red flag that Google support for the Nik Collection has ended.

Link | Posted on Mar 25, 2016 at 14:14 UTC
In reply to:

David Hull: This seems like a great thing but I wonder what it means for the future of the applications?

I had my editing computer die a couple months ago and I e-mailed NIK to see how they handled things since I was an owner and needed to re-install. I couldn't see where to put the codes in in the latest version. The lady I was in contact with just sent me a link to download -- no codes necessary.

Hopefully they will keep investing in these apps.

In the announcement, Google said, "As we continue to focus our long-term investments in building incredible photo editing tools for mobile, including Google Photos and Snapseed, we’ve decided to make the Nik Collection desktop suite available for free..."

That, along with the fact that there have been no updates to Nik in the past 8 months, and no official support for Windows 10 or Photoshop Elements 14, pretty much tells the story. It was no secret that Google bought Nik Software in order to get Snapseed, not for the Nik tools.

Link | Posted on Mar 24, 2016 at 22:27 UTC

As others have noted, the library didn't "release images to the public domain." The library released digital access to public-domain images.

It isn't possible to release anything to the public domain. The term "public domain" describes a negative -- the absence of any restrictions. A person or institution can release their rights to a work, but has no authority to release any other rights that might exist.

It is, in fact, very difficult to absolutely prove that a given work is public domain. [The following is for American usage.] There are some fairly reliable indicators, such as "first published in the US before 1923." But in the end, unless a Federal court has decreed that a particular work is public domain, there's always a chance that someone will claim rights to the work.

Link | Posted on Jan 12, 2016 at 20:32 UTC as 7th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

Aberaeron: Wow! They want everyone to shoot as I do. That's so cool.

Only I expect they want better images and themes than I take, so it doesn't effect me one way or another. I won't be missed. :-(

The Adobe RGB reference is in Reuters' Photographer's Handbook:

Camera Settings
Color space must be set to Adobe RGB.
http://handbook.reuters.com/index.php?title=A_Brief_Guide_to_Standards%2C_Photoshop_and_Captions#Camera_Settings

Link | Posted on Nov 19, 2015 at 18:10 UTC
On article Holga Digital camera project launched on Kickstarter (150 comments in total)
In reply to:

AndroC: Refer to http://www.superheadz.com/digitalharinezumi/ to see how to do this very nicely, with great style and class. [Not an advertisement, just pointing to a certain lack of originality on the part of Holga.]

So are Canon, Nikon, and Pentax being unoriginal by making DSLRs? Are the other ILC manufacturers unoriginal by making mirrorless cameras?

It's not about the idea. It's about the implementation. The Digital Harinezumi has an absolutely terrible reputation for reliability -- reports are that if it happens to work when you unpack it, you'll be lucky if it's still working a month later. It's also a very different packaging aesthetic, gives very different-looking results, and it's only 3 megapixels.

The main competition for a digital Holga is the smart-phone. They're a lot more practical, and a lot more flexible. But one doesn't buy a Holga for practicality, one buys it for fun.

Link | Posted on Sep 2, 2015 at 15:30 UTC
On article Holga Digital camera project launched on Kickstarter (150 comments in total)

Just being picky: I think when Holga says, "original optics" they mean "new optics, for this camera," not "the optics from our original cameras," so the optics can't be "known for" anything. Aside from the absurdity of fitting a 60mm lens on a tiny sensor, and the fact that the classic optics are plastic and this one is claimed to be glass, the sun-flare in their second "Holga Optics" sample picture strongly suggests this is not the single-element meniscus design that's been Holga's staple. I'm certain this is all-new, purpose-built optics.

I think Holga also overstates the "vivid colors" -- it's the Minitar-1 lens on the Lomo that's famous for high contrast and high saturation. The sample pictures they provided from the Digital Holga certainly don't impress with saturation.

I had to chuckle at the lettering on the front of the lens: "Holga Optical Lens". I'm waiting to see what non-optical lenses they come out with.

Link | Posted on Sep 1, 2015 at 22:55 UTC as 15th comment
On article Holga Digital camera project launched on Kickstarter (150 comments in total)

Other than the form factor and aesthetics, I'm not sure I know where they're trying to go with this. Holga already sells lens kits for a wide variety of ILC cameras -- I have a full set for my Canon DSLR.

Well, okay, this one's f/2.8 and f/8.0, according to Holga, who've claimed f/8 for just about all of their medium-format film cameras and ILC lenses but never actually delivered anything that fast. Why haven't they? Because the Holga 60mm lens can't focus anywhere close to infinity, and being single-element (meniscus) it unavoidably has significant longitudinal chromatic aberration. For both reasons, a large depth of focus is needed in order to get sharp (Holga-sharp, anyway) images, and that means keeping it stopped way down. The "f/8" Holga lens for my DSLR is actually about f/25. I bought another and modified it to f/8; what happened can be found in my article here on DPR: http://www.dpreview.com/articles/3776957225/modifying-a-holga-dslr-lens-to-really-be-f8

Link | Posted on Sep 1, 2015 at 22:37 UTC as 16th comment
On article Quick Review: Photographers.pro (60 comments in total)
In reply to:

zsedcft: Why is everybody not using wordpress? I understand the appeal of zenfolio etc. because you can just create a site and they will deal with selling your pictures and handling your clients, but simple portfolio sites look much better with a simple wordpress theme.

You can get a good theme for $50, Hosting for about $4 a month (or less) and your domain for about $10 a year. Once you get a little more advanced, you can add a shopping cart using woocommerce and link it to your paypal account for free. The option are pretty much limitless when you get into plugins. Wordpress.com can even host your site if you don't want to get too technical.

IMHO, if you want to be a pro photographer you pretty much need to know how to run a website. It really isn't too difficult once you get the hang of it, either. The sites on photographers.pro look extremely amateur. You can browse live sample wordpress websites at themeforest to see the difference. Just type "photography" into the search bar there.

The problem that I have with WordPress is security. It's probably the #1 target for website hackers, because it's so widely used and so full of security holes. The themes and addons are often even worse.

Link | Posted on Jul 3, 2015 at 18:40 UTC
On Connect post Flickr for iOS update brings camera roll look and feel (13 comments in total)

Android got the same update.

There are also changes in the Flickr web site.

Link | Posted on May 7, 2015 at 21:02 UTC as 10th comment
On article Flickr for iOS update brings camera roll look and feel (13 comments in total)

Android got the same update.

There are also changes in the Flickr web site.

Link | Posted on May 7, 2015 at 21:02 UTC as 10th comment
In reply to:

D Bowcut: My T6s sensor is fine. Camera purchased 04/26.

Imaging Resource now says they're fairly confident that the problem isn't one that will show up later, such as adhesive deterioration could. The evidence seems to point rather strongly to problems during the vapor deposition of the dichroic IR-reflective (hot mirror) coating on the back of the first Low Pass Filter — that would be the one that's mounted in the ultrasonic dustshaker.

Link | Posted on May 4, 2015 at 17:51 UTC
In reply to:

Zenza R: I come here to read all potential negative comments.. Not satisfied,will come back tomorrow! I am curious which one is worse, the last lensbaby 50 mm or this one :)

I suspect you're not familiar with the Minitar-1. I'd love to see the MTF curves on it, because it produces strong contrast and, consequently, saturated color images. The results can be quite striking, and (at least according to official legend) that look was what led the Lomography company to be formed in the first place.

Link | Posted on May 1, 2015 at 20:44 UTC

Interesting. With the short register of the M-mount (28 mm), this is essentially a non-SLR lens. Leica aside, that means mirrorless. Any of the popular mirrorless mounts should be able to use this lens with an adapter.

What's interesting is that Lomography is dyed-in-the-wool film-oriented, but this lens is mainly of use on digital camera bodies.

Link | Posted on May 1, 2015 at 20:18 UTC as 24th comment
In reply to:

Just a Photographer: Canon 5D mark I was Canon's best sensor in the digital age.

After that they rested their laurels.
Their newest 52MP sensor is nothing more then a pumped up APC-S sensor and lacks DR compared to the Sony 36MP sensor that already dates back to 2012.

Still people buy into Canon because of their brand name and large lens lineup.

Well... the sensor on the original 5D was probably the first big sensor-manufacturing fail for Canon. Some number of the early units had problems where the ITO coating for the dichroic mirror was improperly bonded and would start coming off, presumably triggered by sensor cleaning although I doubt that was ever determined to be the cause. (The 5D's sensor was the first Canon sensor with the ITO coating on the outside of the stack.)

As far as I can tell, Canon never acknowledged the problem, but it caused great consternation among purveyors of sensor-cleaning products.

Link | Posted on May 1, 2015 at 15:28 UTC
On Connect post Camu camera app available for Android (7 comments in total)
In reply to:

Doug Pardee: This article leaves me wondering... why? What does Camu offer that I can't readily find among the zillion other Android camera apps already out there?

The impression I get from poking around elsewhere on the Web is that Camu got some good press on iPhone. Most of the excitement there seems to be about the User Interface, in particular that it's well suited to one-handed operation.

I probably shouldn't, but I'll throw out some opinion.

Maybe it isn't a fair judgment, but my impression is that DPReview Connect's perspective on mobile photography is iPhone-centric. There's certainly an attempt to be balanced, but when what one knows is mostly iPhone, well... an iPhone app being made available to Android users probably seems to be sufficient story in itself.

But as an Android user, my opinion is that an iPhone app becoming available to Android isn't news in itself. What matters to me is what that app adds to the Android photo-app world.

It seems to me that DPReview Connect still doesn't have enough familiarity with the Android photo-app world to provide that information. I'd really like to see more Android expertise being displayed at Connect.

Link | Posted on Jan 21, 2015 at 16:49 UTC
On article Camu camera app available for Android (7 comments in total)
In reply to:

Doug Pardee: This article leaves me wondering... why? What does Camu offer that I can't readily find among the zillion other Android camera apps already out there?

The impression I get from poking around elsewhere on the Web is that Camu got some good press on iPhone. Most of the excitement there seems to be about the User Interface, in particular that it's well suited to one-handed operation.

I probably shouldn't, but I'll throw out some opinion.

Maybe it isn't a fair judgment, but my impression is that DPReview Connect's perspective on mobile photography is iPhone-centric. There's certainly an attempt to be balanced, but when what one knows is mostly iPhone, well... an iPhone app being made available to Android users probably seems to be sufficient story in itself.

But as an Android user, my opinion is that an iPhone app becoming available to Android isn't news in itself. What matters to me is what that app adds to the Android photo-app world.

It seems to me that DPReview Connect still doesn't have enough familiarity with the Android photo-app world to provide that information. I'd really like to see more Android expertise being displayed at Connect.

Link | Posted on Jan 21, 2015 at 16:49 UTC
On article Camu camera app available for Android (7 comments in total)
In reply to:

Doug Pardee: This article leaves me wondering... why? What does Camu offer that I can't readily find among the zillion other Android camera apps already out there?

The impression I get from poking around elsewhere on the Web is that Camu got some good press on iPhone. Most of the excitement there seems to be about the User Interface, in particular that it's well suited to one-handed operation.

Perhaps I should be a bit more direct in my comments. They'd be easier to follow that way. :-)

There are new camera apps coming out every day, or so it seems. Virtually all of them are free, or have free versions or free trials. But trying them all is an exhausting task.

I don't expect a "full review" of these apps — after all, if I personally don't have time to check them out, I don't expect DPReview to — but it'd be nice to know at least what makes a particular app newsworthy.

After playing with Camu for Android, I come up with "live collage" as being its one and only unusual feature.

Alas, as Menneisyys reported, there are some notable drawbacks to Camu. Well, of course it's not for serious snapshooters. But that aside, the slightly reduced resolution (12 Mpix on my 13 Mpix G2) is bizarre, and the absence of EXIF (and no location data) is a serious problem for a lot of us. One of my photos doesn't even have the preview image in the EXIF.

Link | Posted on Jan 21, 2015 at 16:20 UTC
On Connect post Camu camera app available for Android (7 comments in total)
In reply to:

Doug Pardee: This article leaves me wondering... why? What does Camu offer that I can't readily find among the zillion other Android camera apps already out there?

The impression I get from poking around elsewhere on the Web is that Camu got some good press on iPhone. Most of the excitement there seems to be about the User Interface, in particular that it's well suited to one-handed operation.

Perhaps I should be a bit more direct in my comments. They'd be easier to follow that way. :-)

There are new camera apps coming out every day, or so it seems. Virtually all of them are free, or have free versions or free trials. But trying them all is an exhausting task.

I don't expect a "full review" of these apps — after all, if I personally don't have time to check them out, I don't expect DPReview to — but it'd be nice to know at least what makes a particular app newsworthy.

After playing with Camu for Android, I come up with "live collage" as being its one and only unusual feature.

Alas, as Menneisyys reported, there are some notable drawbacks to Camu. Well, of course it's not for serious snapshooters. But that aside, the slightly reduced resolution (12 Mpix on my 13 Mpix G2) is bizarre, and the absence of EXIF (and no location data) is a serious problem for a lot of us. One of my photos doesn't even have the preview image in the EXIF.

Link | Posted on Jan 21, 2015 at 16:20 UTC
On Connect post Camu camera app available for Android (7 comments in total)

This article leaves me wondering... why? What does Camu offer that I can't readily find among the zillion other Android camera apps already out there?

The impression I get from poking around elsewhere on the Web is that Camu got some good press on iPhone. Most of the excitement there seems to be about the User Interface, in particular that it's well suited to one-handed operation.

Link | Posted on Jan 20, 2015 at 23:04 UTC as 2nd comment | 5 replies
Total: 183, showing: 1 – 20
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