Doug Pardee

Doug Pardee

Lives in United States Southern, CA, United States
Joined on May 28, 2005

Comments

Total: 135, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

D Bowcut: My T6s sensor is fine. Camera purchased 04/26.

Imaging Resource now says they're fairly confident that the problem isn't one that will show up later, such as adhesive deterioration could. The evidence seems to point rather strongly to problems during the vapor deposition of the dichroic IR-reflective (hot mirror) coating on the back of the first Low Pass Filter — that would be the one that's mounted in the ultrasonic dustshaker.

Direct link | Posted on May 4, 2015 at 17:51 UTC
In reply to:

Zenza R: I come here to read all potential negative comments.. Not satisfied,will come back tomorrow! I am curious which one is worse, the last lensbaby 50 mm or this one :)

I suspect you're not familiar with the Minitar-1. I'd love to see the MTF curves on it, because it produces strong contrast and, consequently, saturated color images. The results can be quite striking, and (at least according to official legend) that look was what led the Lomography company to be formed in the first place.

Direct link | Posted on May 1, 2015 at 20:44 UTC

Interesting. With the short register of the M-mount (28 mm), this is essentially a non-SLR lens. Leica aside, that means mirrorless. Any of the popular mirrorless mounts should be able to use this lens with an adapter.

What's interesting is that Lomography is dyed-in-the-wool film-oriented, but this lens is mainly of use on digital camera bodies.

Direct link | Posted on May 1, 2015 at 20:18 UTC as 22nd comment
In reply to:

Just a Photographer: Canon 5D mark I was Canon's best sensor in the digital age.

After that they rested their laurels.
Their newest 52MP sensor is nothing more then a pumped up APC-S sensor and lacks DR compared to the Sony 36MP sensor that already dates back to 2012.

Still people buy into Canon because of their brand name and large lens lineup.

Well... the sensor on the original 5D was probably the first big sensor-manufacturing fail for Canon. Some number of the early units had problems where the ITO coating for the dichroic mirror was improperly bonded and would start coming off, presumably triggered by sensor cleaning although I doubt that was ever determined to be the cause. (The 5D's sensor was the first Canon sensor with the ITO coating on the outside of the stack.)

As far as I can tell, Canon never acknowledged the problem, but it caused great consternation among purveyors of sensor-cleaning products.

Direct link | Posted on May 1, 2015 at 15:28 UTC
On Camu camera app available for Android post (7 comments in total)
In reply to:

Doug Pardee: This article leaves me wondering... why? What does Camu offer that I can't readily find among the zillion other Android camera apps already out there?

The impression I get from poking around elsewhere on the Web is that Camu got some good press on iPhone. Most of the excitement there seems to be about the User Interface, in particular that it's well suited to one-handed operation.

I probably shouldn't, but I'll throw out some opinion.

Maybe it isn't a fair judgment, but my impression is that DPReview Connect's perspective on mobile photography is iPhone-centric. There's certainly an attempt to be balanced, but when what one knows is mostly iPhone, well... an iPhone app being made available to Android users probably seems to be sufficient story in itself.

But as an Android user, my opinion is that an iPhone app becoming available to Android isn't news in itself. What matters to me is what that app adds to the Android photo-app world.

It seems to me that DPReview Connect still doesn't have enough familiarity with the Android photo-app world to provide that information. I'd really like to see more Android expertise being displayed at Connect.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 21, 2015 at 16:49 UTC
On Camu camera app available for Android post (7 comments in total)
In reply to:

Doug Pardee: This article leaves me wondering... why? What does Camu offer that I can't readily find among the zillion other Android camera apps already out there?

The impression I get from poking around elsewhere on the Web is that Camu got some good press on iPhone. Most of the excitement there seems to be about the User Interface, in particular that it's well suited to one-handed operation.

Perhaps I should be a bit more direct in my comments. They'd be easier to follow that way. :-)

There are new camera apps coming out every day, or so it seems. Virtually all of them are free, or have free versions or free trials. But trying them all is an exhausting task.

I don't expect a "full review" of these apps — after all, if I personally don't have time to check them out, I don't expect DPReview to — but it'd be nice to know at least what makes a particular app newsworthy.

After playing with Camu for Android, I come up with "live collage" as being its one and only unusual feature.

Alas, as Menneisyys reported, there are some notable drawbacks to Camu. Well, of course it's not for serious snapshooters. But that aside, the slightly reduced resolution (12 Mpix on my 13 Mpix G2) is bizarre, and the absence of EXIF (and no location data) is a serious problem for a lot of us. One of my photos doesn't even have the preview image in the EXIF.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 21, 2015 at 16:20 UTC
On Camu camera app available for Android post (7 comments in total)

This article leaves me wondering... why? What does Camu offer that I can't readily find among the zillion other Android camera apps already out there?

The impression I get from poking around elsewhere on the Web is that Camu got some good press on iPhone. Most of the excitement there seems to be about the User Interface, in particular that it's well suited to one-handed operation.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 20, 2015 at 23:04 UTC as 2nd comment | 5 replies
In reply to:

lbpix: I'm amazed that so many folk are all fired up about a simple statistic. Flickr didn't say iPhones are better than cameras, just that they have had more uploads from them - a simple fact. My Nikon takes far better quality photos than my iPhone but it isn't always in my pocket.

Minor correction. Flickr didn't say they had more uploads from iPhones, they had uploads from more iPhone *users*. They aren't counting the total number of uploads, just the number of users who uploaded at least one photo during the week.

Doesn't change your point, though.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 17, 2015 at 16:35 UTC
In reply to:

iAPX: Would be interesting to know the proportion of cameras related to users, not the proportion of cameras related to posted pictures.

On the other end, I would like to see this result (cameras by posted pictures) weighted by number of view of each picture; even a ratio of number of view per posted picture per camera;

There are interesting metrics that could give us more insight into who is owning what on flickr, and which cameras generates pictures more interesting on flickr.

The numbers are, according to Flickr, related to users and not to posted pictures. (That was noted in this article, too.) They only count a camera once per user, not once per uploaded picture.

There is the caveat, of course, that it's for *active* users. If you don't upload any photos from one of your cameras that week, that camera isn't counted for that week. Which strikes me as being more useful than simple camera ownership.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 17, 2015 at 16:18 UTC

Interesting pictures.

I have to wonder about the copyright notice, though. A quickie look around the Web suggests that the originals probably would have been under Crown Copyright for 125 years after they were created. That would end in 1987, so today they would be out of copyright. But since they (presumably) weren't previously published — exhibition doesn't count as publication — the owner would retain Publication Rights for 25 years after first publication. Not copyright, but publication rights.

Anyone have better insight into the legal status of these?

Direct link | Posted on Nov 14, 2014 at 21:37 UTC as 10th comment
On Portrait Salon 'rejects' exhibition opens in London article (63 comments in total)
In reply to:

PPierre: I think the 7th one is amazingly well thought: good atmosphere, good story, and a topic we never talk about/feel ashamed to talk about though it exists and is quite common. I like this kind of photos !

Am I the only one who gets more than a bit of Crewdson's "Beneath the Roses" vibe from #7?

Direct link | Posted on Nov 7, 2014 at 19:38 UTC

Registering Trunx now does not "secure yourself free unlimited cloud storage for life." That was a misinterpretation by TNW.

What Trunx is offering is that all photos and videos uploaded by the end of September will be stored free for life. From what Trunx has said, it sounds to me like you could replace those photos and videos with other content later; that basically however much storage you're using on September 30 is how much storage you'll have for free for life.

No indication yet as to what charges will apply to photos and videos uploaded starting in October. The official statement is, "the cost for the unlimited account will be inexpensive and very competitive, especially when compared to other cloud services."

Ref: http://support.trunx.me/knowledgebase/articles/286076-what-is-the-price-after-september-2014

Direct link | Posted on Jul 10, 2014 at 20:52 UTC as 1st comment
On HTC One 2014 leaks, comes with "Duo Camera" post (26 comments in total)
In reply to:

Combatmedic870: This device will also get an SD card slot. So thats pretty exciting! for me its either this or the Sony Z2. Which ever one makes it to the states faster!

BTW, the camera is 5MP("Ultra pixels"). I dont know what the 2nd one is though.

Starting with KitKat, the SD card slot is a lot less useful, because apps can't write to it except for their own app-specific folder. Which also means that a file manager can't copy files onto it except into the file manager's own specific folder.

With KitKat, the external SD card is mainly of value for importing files that you've loaded up elsewhere, because apps aren't restricted on *reading* the card.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 13, 2014 at 17:10 UTC
On VSCO Cam arrives for Android post (9 comments in total)
In reply to:

Doug Pardee: Doesn't work on my LG Lucid. It forces the resolution to a setting that the camera doesn't support (3072x1728 on a 2560x1920 sensor), resulting in an image that's just a bunch of lines. Since VSCO provides no controls, there's no way to reset the resolution to anything that works.

I just upgraded to the LG G2, and I'm now a believer. With a top-notch phone, VSCO Cam really delivers. With a low-end phone, not so much.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 11, 2014 at 15:53 UTC
On Adobe leaks 'Lightroom Mobile' app post (3 comments in total)

To each their own, but personally, I can't imagine doing serious editing on an uncalibrated screen. I do use my phone quite a bit for casual editing, but there are some great free apps for that, and I don't see any reason to pay for Lightroom.

If it lets you synchronize your phone photos into your Lightroom catalog, that could be useful for some folks. Well, except that the current Lightroom crowd seems to enjoy sneering at phone cameras as being unworthy, so maybe not now.

Maybe with the raw-shooting phones that are always "coming soon." But again, editing on an uncalibrated screen?

Direct link | Posted on Jan 19, 2014 at 17:33 UTC as 2nd comment
In reply to:

PDavis: Did they really Just list as a con "very slow shutter speeds inevitably lead to motion blur in non-static scenes"? Really?

The Android specs provide for an "auto-ISO favoring higher ISO" setting. It's called HJR (hand jitter reduction). I don't know if the G2's libcamera.so module provides that or not.

Many Android camera apps don't give access to HJR even if the camera makes it available. Some that do (at least on my phone) include Snap Camera, PerfectShot, Camera360 Ultimate, and Vignette.

Of course, even if you've got HJR available, how well it works is up to the libcamera.so module that the phone or camera maker provided.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 27, 2013 at 00:16 UTC
On VSCO Cam arrives for Android post (9 comments in total)

Doesn't work on my LG Lucid. It forces the resolution to a setting that the camera doesn't support (3072x1728 on a 2560x1920 sensor), resulting in an image that's just a bunch of lines. Since VSCO provides no controls, there's no way to reset the resolution to anything that works.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 7, 2013 at 23:53 UTC as 1st comment | 1 reply
On Modifying a Holga DSLR lens to really be f/8 article (6 comments in total)
In reply to:

nicolasgmatonti: Hi, i have bought this HOLGA lens pack for my Samsung NX100 but can't take any picture. When i press the button to shot it says "check lens" any idea of what i should do in order to use them correctly? any suggestion? thanks!!!

I don't have that camera, but usually you need to be in M or A mode, because the camera is unable to adjust the aperture for the other modes.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 12, 2013 at 23:00 UTC
On Can Photojournalism Survive in the Instagram Era? article (102 comments in total)

Asked about "video supplanting photography", he says, "A non-linear narrative that allows for increased complexity and depth, and encourages both subject and reader to have greater involvement, will eventually emerge more fully from the digital environment. This, in a sense, is the more profound democratization of media."

Whatever that means.

I think video is the real threat to the traditional photojournalist, not citizens. Still photography will eventually join B&W on the sidelines. The question is how long it'll take until that happens.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 19, 2013 at 20:04 UTC as 44th comment
In reply to:

Johnsonj: 100 million kids with camera phones will always beat a staff of pros with the best gear.

"iPhone and be there."

Direct link | Posted on May 30, 2013 at 22:16 UTC
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