klimbkat

klimbkat

Lives in United States Aurora, United States
Has a website at www.zenfolio.com/adairphotos
Joined on Apr 19, 2008

Comments

Total: 7, showing: 1 – 7

Beautiful series, quiet and thought provoking. Many of the photos are simple yet subtly urge the viewer to consider the how and why - for example, why is the light bulb on the mantle? The answer could be many things (or nothing), but we are left to decide ourselves (sometimes a supreme challenge with AZ). That is the mark of good art - it involves us and does not supply everything we viewers need to make our own connection. Well done.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 28, 2014 at 17:16 UTC as 8th comment
On Tamas Dezso offers glimpse into post-Communist Romania article (238 comments in total)

Intriguing photos capturing a fascinating subject - the transition from a traditional life through the decay of the Soviet era infrastructure. Undoubtedly, this is but one facet of Romania. For those that would like to see other facets (say happy young people is sports cars or shiny new buildings), I'm sure there are plenty of images out there for your to find. But if not, here's yet another opportunity to grab your camera and go shoot what interests you. Rather than complain about this photographer's choice of subject or scope, appreciate the beauty of his work and celebrate his right to choose his own vision, a right we all share.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 19, 2014 at 17:01 UTC as 62nd comment
On In Photos: Portraits of the living legends of blues article (35 comments in total)
In reply to:

Rick Knepper: Portraits of the living legends of blues

Since 2008, photographer Lou Bopp has made regular trips down Mississippi's Route 61 — known as 'The Blues Highway' — to document the lives of unknown musicians who have made important contributions to the classic American musical genre.

These fellows are either living legends or unknown musicians. I don't think you can have it both ways. Since I own CDs of most of the Legends of Blues, living or otherwise, I was surprised to see these names mentioned under a title containing the term "Living Legends". DPR, you need to work a little harder on your editorial skills.

)What did these particular guys contribute to the genre to make them specifically such important contributors to it?

The roots of the genre, which is much more than just its recordings - its the setting and characters. Perhaps these 60-70-80 year old bluesmen are not "Legends" with a capital "L", but their place and their voice is legendary. Plus, they make great photo subjects . . .

Direct link | Posted on Nov 17, 2013 at 04:47 UTC
On In Photos: Portraits of the living legends of blues article (35 comments in total)
In reply to:

Rick Knepper: Portraits of the living legends of blues

Since 2008, photographer Lou Bopp has made regular trips down Mississippi's Route 61 — known as 'The Blues Highway' — to document the lives of unknown musicians who have made important contributions to the classic American musical genre.

These fellows are either living legends or unknown musicians. I don't think you can have it both ways. Since I own CDs of most of the Legends of Blues, living or otherwise, I was surprised to see these names mentioned under a title containing the term "Living Legends". DPR, you need to work a little harder on your editorial skills.

> Legend (noun) - a famous or IMPORTANT person who is known for doing something extremely well

These guys were/are important in their contributions to a unique American genre. That they did not make the 'big time" is of no moment, because they built the foundation on which the modern blues players stand. These old guys are the real deal and, again, their photos speak louder than any of us on 11 (and I've played, blues etc., pro for 40 years incl. w/ Albert Collins in mid 70s).

Direct link | Posted on Nov 17, 2013 at 00:48 UTC
On In Photos: Portraits of the living legends of blues article (35 comments in total)
In reply to:

Rick Knepper: Portraits of the living legends of blues

Since 2008, photographer Lou Bopp has made regular trips down Mississippi's Route 61 — known as 'The Blues Highway' — to document the lives of unknown musicians who have made important contributions to the classic American musical genre.

These fellows are either living legends or unknown musicians. I don't think you can have it both ways. Since I own CDs of most of the Legends of Blues, living or otherwise, I was surprised to see these names mentioned under a title containing the term "Living Legends". DPR, you need to work a little harder on your editorial skills.

Geez - just because YOU have not heard of these guys (they don't havebig label press kits and mass-marketed cds) does not mean that they are not both the real deal and genuine "legends." Many of the big names in blues are there only through a lucky break or two, and if you ask those folks, they give it up for the many others of similar talent that never made it out of the regional scenes. This area, in particular, has been characterized as a particularly vibrant traditional blues scene from which some of the bigger names emerged. DPR is right on the money to call these photos of legends, and good work too - some very evocative images. There's a ton of legendary blues out there few folks have heard of - great that some of this history is captured before it is gone. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Blues_record_labels

Direct link | Posted on Nov 16, 2013 at 18:36 UTC
On Pentax K-3 real-world samples gallery article (150 comments in total)

For a photo site significantly populated by gear heads and pixel peepers along with many, many very good photographers, posting this kind of junk is not helpful to anyone. Poorly framed pieces with lousy technical attention may be OK for a P&S, but for a new, cutting-edge semi-pro DSLR, this seems like a bad idea. If you must post random out-of-camera jpgs, then the burden is on the photographer to optimize the setting AND the capture. Of course, if the intent is to make the camera look bad to folks that don't know better, perhaps this is the way to do it . . .

Direct link | Posted on Nov 12, 2013 at 01:20 UTC as 27th comment
On Classic lines when clients want you to work for free article (141 comments in total)

A local law firm wanted to use some of my images - for free, of course," for the exposure." I asked them if I did so would they provide me with free legal advice the next time I was in need - and I would, of course, tell everyone I knew how great they were. Needless to say, that is where the conversation ended.

In addition to photography, I've worked 40 years as a musician - same drill there (and the same answer - no freebies).

Direct link | Posted on Jun 6, 2013 at 00:30 UTC as 64th comment | 2 replies
Total: 7, showing: 1 – 7