klimbkat

klimbkat

Lives in United States Aurora, United States
Has a website at www.zenfolio.com/adairphotos
Joined on Apr 19, 2008

Comments

Total: 22, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

Timbukto: Pentax, the only brand that when guessing the price after reading the specs, I always go over.

Too funny, Alphazoid - best laugh of the day!

Link | Posted on Jun 8, 2016 at 23:04 UTC
In reply to:

Kostasm: Amazing performance indeed. So bad though there are no equivalent to the sensor lens options at the moment. Visible CA ruins the perfection. Just image how an Otus lens would perform in pixel shift..

You guys are talking past each other. Sure, it would be great to have more lenses, but there are many good K mount lenses available, including the DFA 50 macro, a high end lens that will "proportionally perform" (assuming that means good edge to edge).

Link | Posted on May 9, 2016 at 14:38 UTC
On article Canon announces budget-friendly EOS Rebel T6 (1300D) (895 comments in total)
In reply to:

jonny1976: http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/982523-REG/pentax_10883_k_50_digital_camera_body.html

this is an example...290 dollar...pentaprism, big ov, double wheel. weather sealed, in body stabilization....and on and on...more fps...more buffer...
By the way pentax had the correction for tungsten light with k7...probably 5 years ago.

and i could say the same for any camera under 500 dollar of any brand...

i'm sure the answer will be...yes but canon has lenses...asure...big flenses, or cheap plastic apsc not sealed lenses....

K50 is a great camera, but the notion that entry-level DSLR users don't shoot jpgs is just wrong. Most folks who transition from P&S want better images from the camera, not from a PP program - that comes later, if ever. The k50 jpgs are fine, and though the Pentax presets are not as vivid as Canikon, they can always be tweaked. Of course, many users don't even bother adjusting that . . .

Link | Posted on Mar 10, 2016 at 16:13 UTC
On article UPDATED: CP+ 2016: shooting the Pentax K-1 in Yokohama (377 comments in total)
In reply to:

GabrielZ: Pentax's 'Limited Primes' are they FF or optimized only for APS-C?

Thanks - the DA 70 looks quite nice and no vignetting wide open

Link | Posted on Mar 4, 2016 at 01:06 UTC
On article UPDATED: CP+ 2016: shooting the Pentax K-1 in Yokohama (377 comments in total)
In reply to:

GabrielZ: Pentax's 'Limited Primes' are they FF or optimized only for APS-C?

The DA 40 and DA 70 Limited pancakes also appear to cover the FF circle. The 40 is optically similar to the earlier versions which were FF (I have am M 40 from decades ago) - not sure about the 70.

Link | Posted on Mar 3, 2016 at 15:48 UTC
On article The long, difficult road to Pentax full-frame (617 comments in total)
In reply to:

yslee1: All this talk of lenses, and no mention of the beautiful FA Limited lenses?

I have no idea how they'll perform on digital, but perhaps someone can press Pentax on future FA (Digital) Limited lenses.

@danslic What are you talking about? All of the FA Ltds. are full frame lenses that have no issues on APS-C, certainly not "poor at the edges."

Link | Posted on Feb 19, 2016 at 17:35 UTC
In reply to:

teddoman: I own wool glomitts. I've always wished for the perfect gloves and this story has some great comments in it. I wonder if they're going to be able to build a perfect glove that fits everyone's needs. For me, thin gloves are the right size but too cold, and thick gloves are the right warmth but too thick. I just ordered some cheap 7 mm neoprenes to see if those will work for me. Would it make sense for Vallerret to design some sort of attachment so people can cut off the tips of whatever gloves they buy to match their size/warmth needs and then still be able to cover their fingertips with the attachment?

True, but only the glomitt allows the layers to be separated down to fingers without actually removing a layer. If you spend enough, you can even get them in camo :-)

Link | Posted on Dec 4, 2015 at 02:15 UTC
In reply to:

teddoman: I own wool glomitts. I've always wished for the perfect gloves and this story has some great comments in it. I wonder if they're going to be able to build a perfect glove that fits everyone's needs. For me, thin gloves are the right size but too cold, and thick gloves are the right warmth but too thick. I just ordered some cheap 7 mm neoprenes to see if those will work for me. Would it make sense for Vallerret to design some sort of attachment so people can cut off the tips of whatever gloves they buy to match their size/warmth needs and then still be able to cover their fingertips with the attachment?

Actually, I use this approach (different weights of liner gloves). As an alpine climber with Reynaud's (causes loss of blood flow to fingers), keeping my hands warm has been critical for decades, and this is the best system I've come up with. Try using a chemical hand warmer in the mitt of the glomitt (seems to stay there OK) to keep your fingers warmer.

Link | Posted on Dec 3, 2015 at 19:25 UTC
In reply to:

teddoman: I own wool glomitts. I've always wished for the perfect gloves and this story has some great comments in it. I wonder if they're going to be able to build a perfect glove that fits everyone's needs. For me, thin gloves are the right size but too cold, and thick gloves are the right warmth but too thick. I just ordered some cheap 7 mm neoprenes to see if those will work for me. Would it make sense for Vallerret to design some sort of attachment so people can cut off the tips of whatever gloves they buy to match their size/warmth needs and then still be able to cover their fingertips with the attachment?

Use a liner glove under your glomitt - anything thin enough to still use your camera controls - works great!

Link | Posted on Dec 3, 2015 at 18:19 UTC

Glomitts - fingerless gloves with a mitten cover (so warmer than gloves) have been available for decades and are great for all manner of cold weather applications. I use a very light synth thin liner glove with Outdoor Research (OR) fleece glomitts - total system is half this projected cost, warmer, and more versatile. Neoprene fishing gloves are really cheap - nip a finger or thumb as I do. These folks are way too late and way too overpriced. Plus, can you really get your card out without taking off the gloves?

Link | Posted on Dec 3, 2015 at 15:21 UTC as 24th comment | 2 replies

Nice images and very informative text - well done!

Link | Posted on Sep 13, 2015 at 14:35 UTC as 40th comment
On article Readers' Showcase: Alexander Jikharev (34 comments in total)

Nice work from a wandering Pentaxian . . .

Link | Posted on Jun 7, 2015 at 14:08 UTC as 24th comment
In reply to:

klimbkat: At $64 (plus harness) I want one for each of my cats . . . now we'll finally know where they hide.

I think I can handle it - at least now I'll have the option (unless the harness is stupidly expensive)

Link | Posted on Mar 5, 2015 at 02:16 UTC

At $64 (plus harness) I want one for each of my cats . . . now we'll finally know where they hide.

Link | Posted on Mar 4, 2015 at 20:18 UTC as 86th comment | 2 replies
On article UPDATED: Real-world samples: Sony Alpha 7 II in Kauai (227 comments in total)

Wow - really underwhelming, particularly since Kauai is so photogenic. Why bother showing such mediocre snapshots?

Link | Posted on Jan 18, 2015 at 18:14 UTC as 57th comment | 2 replies

Beautiful series, quiet and thought provoking. Many of the photos are simple yet subtly urge the viewer to consider the how and why - for example, why is the light bulb on the mantle? The answer could be many things (or nothing), but we are left to decide ourselves (sometimes a supreme challenge with AZ). That is the mark of good art - it involves us and does not supply everything we viewers need to make our own connection. Well done.

Link | Posted on Sep 28, 2014 at 17:16 UTC as 9th comment
On article Tamas Dezso offers glimpse into post-Communist Romania (231 comments in total)

Intriguing photos capturing a fascinating subject - the transition from a traditional life through the decay of the Soviet era infrastructure. Undoubtedly, this is but one facet of Romania. For those that would like to see other facets (say happy young people is sports cars or shiny new buildings), I'm sure there are plenty of images out there for your to find. But if not, here's yet another opportunity to grab your camera and go shoot what interests you. Rather than complain about this photographer's choice of subject or scope, appreciate the beauty of his work and celebrate his right to choose his own vision, a right we all share.

Link | Posted on Jan 19, 2014 at 17:01 UTC as 63rd comment
On article In Photos: Portraits of the living legends of blues (36 comments in total)
In reply to:

Rick Knepper: Portraits of the living legends of blues

Since 2008, photographer Lou Bopp has made regular trips down Mississippi's Route 61 — known as 'The Blues Highway' — to document the lives of unknown musicians who have made important contributions to the classic American musical genre.

These fellows are either living legends or unknown musicians. I don't think you can have it both ways. Since I own CDs of most of the Legends of Blues, living or otherwise, I was surprised to see these names mentioned under a title containing the term "Living Legends". DPR, you need to work a little harder on your editorial skills.

)What did these particular guys contribute to the genre to make them specifically such important contributors to it?

The roots of the genre, which is much more than just its recordings - its the setting and characters. Perhaps these 60-70-80 year old bluesmen are not "Legends" with a capital "L", but their place and their voice is legendary. Plus, they make great photo subjects . . .

Link | Posted on Nov 17, 2013 at 04:47 UTC
On article In Photos: Portraits of the living legends of blues (36 comments in total)
In reply to:

Rick Knepper: Portraits of the living legends of blues

Since 2008, photographer Lou Bopp has made regular trips down Mississippi's Route 61 — known as 'The Blues Highway' — to document the lives of unknown musicians who have made important contributions to the classic American musical genre.

These fellows are either living legends or unknown musicians. I don't think you can have it both ways. Since I own CDs of most of the Legends of Blues, living or otherwise, I was surprised to see these names mentioned under a title containing the term "Living Legends". DPR, you need to work a little harder on your editorial skills.

> Legend (noun) - a famous or IMPORTANT person who is known for doing something extremely well

These guys were/are important in their contributions to a unique American genre. That they did not make the 'big time" is of no moment, because they built the foundation on which the modern blues players stand. These old guys are the real deal and, again, their photos speak louder than any of us on 11 (and I've played, blues etc., pro for 40 years incl. w/ Albert Collins in mid 70s).

Link | Posted on Nov 17, 2013 at 00:48 UTC
On article In Photos: Portraits of the living legends of blues (36 comments in total)
In reply to:

Rick Knepper: Portraits of the living legends of blues

Since 2008, photographer Lou Bopp has made regular trips down Mississippi's Route 61 — known as 'The Blues Highway' — to document the lives of unknown musicians who have made important contributions to the classic American musical genre.

These fellows are either living legends or unknown musicians. I don't think you can have it both ways. Since I own CDs of most of the Legends of Blues, living or otherwise, I was surprised to see these names mentioned under a title containing the term "Living Legends". DPR, you need to work a little harder on your editorial skills.

Geez - just because YOU have not heard of these guys (they don't havebig label press kits and mass-marketed cds) does not mean that they are not both the real deal and genuine "legends." Many of the big names in blues are there only through a lucky break or two, and if you ask those folks, they give it up for the many others of similar talent that never made it out of the regional scenes. This area, in particular, has been characterized as a particularly vibrant traditional blues scene from which some of the bigger names emerged. DPR is right on the money to call these photos of legends, and good work too - some very evocative images. There's a ton of legendary blues out there few folks have heard of - great that some of this history is captured before it is gone. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Blues_record_labels

Link | Posted on Nov 16, 2013 at 18:36 UTC
Total: 22, showing: 1 – 20
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