gravelhopper

gravelhopper

Joined on Apr 13, 2014

Comments

Total: 3, showing: 1 – 3

I believe that DSLR AF inaccuracy will be the main reason for extinction of cameras that do AF with a sensor other than the main picture sensor - so mostly DSLRs with mirrors.

Gleaning from my own experience and what I see mentioned in many posts AF inaccuracy is common among most DSLRs. I also believe that many posters who complain about cameras and lenses "not to be sharp" are not aware that they are actually dealing with front- or back-focusing AF.

I learned the hard way and spent a lot of money until it dawned unto me what I was really dealing with.

(post continued below ...)

Direct link | Posted on Jan 23, 2016 at 12:22 UTC as 7th comment

With today's resolution and optical performance smallest focus deviations become apparent when we examine our pictures on the screen. The bad message is that reasons for that are complex, i.e. AF accuracy depends on camera-lens-combination, color temperature, brightness, aperture, distance to object, focal length, and - worst of all - your camera's mood on a given day (my own experience). Even if camera makers implemented an elaborate function to compensate for ff/bf, there are too many variables changing with every shooting situation, rendering such function mostly ineffective.

What an outlook: we spend hundreds of dollars on a new lens - basically to have entered a lottery where we need to run time consuming tests (over days!) to find out if we got lucky or not. The days of my DSLR are counted.

Regards

Direct link | Posted on Jan 23, 2016 at 12:21 UTC as 8th comment
On article Pentax K-3 Review (522 comments in total)

Interesting to see that dpr does not mention the K3's AF capability in low light. For every in-door available light photographer this is as cruicial as low noise at high ISO. When reviewing the K5 II this was mentioned: "As for light levels, I was able to compare the K-5 II with the Nikon D7100, and found I was able to focus with the K-5 II in lower light than with the Nikon. In exceptionally low light (a large blacked-out room lit with a single tungsten bulb) there was a clear point where the Nikon's AF system (rated down to -2EV) just gave up, never delivering a focus confirmation beep, and the K-5 II (rated down to -3EV) kept on making accurate decisions." Also something I do not understand: for both the K5 ii and the K3 the whole "performance" section is missing while it is being part of other reviews. Anyway, I hope the K5 ii low light capabilities are a base feature in all Pentax bodies now.

Regards

Direct link | Posted on Apr 13, 2014 at 13:50 UTC as 59th comment | 2 replies
Total: 3, showing: 1 – 3