ALFREDofAVALON

ALFREDofAVALON

Lives in United States San Antonio, TX, United States
Works as a Photographer
Has a website at www.AlBolch.com
Joined on Jul 8, 2012

Comments

Total: 41, showing: 21 – 40
« First‹ Previous123Next ›Last »
In reply to:

twstriving: I didn’t know Trey Hardee was a Special Olympian (see headline photo). In fact, I have no idea who Trey Hardee is.

And BTW, this being "up on a pedestal," does not last forever. They are young, and this is their time. You don't want to honor them for years of hard work? Among other functions, Photography, as you know, does that. It preserves great moments now, for later when time has marched on, and the only thing left IS a photograph. That is why greatness, above normal achievement - heroism, deserve and call for the same when being photographed. It is not unreasonable. It makes a lot of sense.

As to getting a life, now that YOU mention it. Maybe I'm a little frustrated, that MY career, as maybe with some others here, is not what it could be, and I'd give anything do assignments for this Photo Agency [fat chance now, LOL].

But here we see these kind of shenanigans, and think, "well heck!" Thirty years and....

Well, you get the picture. It ain't pretty. So this story has a lot of irksome aspects to it.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 9, 2012 at 18:31 UTC
In reply to:

twstriving: I didn’t know Trey Hardee was a Special Olympian (see headline photo). In fact, I have no idea who Trey Hardee is.

Now if you want photos of the great athletes, with say her in her sneakers and running suit, holding a baby on her hip, leaning into the washing machine, pulling out the laundry, saying in effect, this is the normal life of this great athlete, then fine, I agree, that would be a cool day-in-the-life portrait. But these were studio portraits. The subject is isolated, that becomes more difficult. Still, if that's what you wanted, and the photographer were to deliver a this-is-a-great-athlete, but-see-how-down-to-earth-normal-she-is-photo, then fine. More power to you (the photographer and agency).

Direct link | Posted on Jul 9, 2012 at 18:20 UTC
In reply to:

twstriving: I didn’t know Trey Hardee was a Special Olympian (see headline photo). In fact, I have no idea who Trey Hardee is.

As to "normality," you're mixing meanings of the word. Relative the discussion at hand (sports) you and I, we are normal, they are well beyond normal. My contention, and others, is that they deserve beyond normal treatment. Which, by the way, they got sub-normal treatment photographically, and many of us being pros and serious photo enthusiasts, were a bit taken back by the shoddiness of the photographer's and the agency's work. And since they didn't have a PR agent to take up for them, I and others seem to be taking that role. They were hoodwinked and taken advantage of by this very competent photographer and this premier Photo Agency.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 9, 2012 at 18:18 UTC
In reply to:

twstriving: I didn’t know Trey Hardee was a Special Olympian (see headline photo). In fact, I have no idea who Trey Hardee is.

Mr. Manuel,
Forgive me for "overreacting," passion is just a part my particular brand of human makeup - I'm an artist and maybe just a bit upset that a perfectly competent photographer (I went to his website) was hired by the premier Photo Agency in France (and the world), yet decided, for some reason, to purposely slight these wonderful athletes with what seems like a hatchet job smear and offer them for sale to the world.

No, they aren't the only US Olympic Portraits (thank goodness), but these athletes don't deserve this seeming slight, and we are reacting to it.

I appreciate your sarcasm. I use sarcasm and hyperbole too, when I express myself, as well. No, they aren't Marvel heroes. Who said they were? Marvel heroes are drawings of fictional characters with bazaar abilities, not even close to normal. Its just that some of these mere humans can run the 100 meter day in 9 seconds and change. You think that's normal?

Direct link | Posted on Jul 9, 2012 at 18:17 UTC
In reply to:

Biowizard: Just been looking at some of the others - I think as a collection, they are brilliant: in fact, the first part of this entire, tired Olympics thing that has actually made me smile.

Klamar should be proud of this work, and any folks who think the images unprofessional or unpatriotic needs to chill out, and gain a little perspective.

Brian

You guys are mistaken about what the problem here is.

This is not about entertaining your tired bored minds. It is about the pinnacle of human physical achievement and how this laudable task in representing one's country in the WORLD Olympics should be depicted in photographic portraits.

If that is not entertaining enough for you, "see what's on the 'Tele'."

Direct link | Posted on Jul 9, 2012 at 05:39 UTC
In reply to:

ALFREDofAVALON: The objections really have nothing to do with patriotism, but quality - aesthetics, visual grammar, protocol and respect are enough, without even bringing up the subject of patriotism and/or your disdain for patriotism.

His work is not inspiring, indeed. And if any subject should be depicted in an inspiring way, new, fresh, unique or otherwise, it is these athletes who are the very tops in human athletic achievement.

Who the heck thinks they have the right to denigrate their achievement with debasing them as common, by way of humiliating photographic depictions, under the phony guise of "unique or fresh?" They are anything but common. They are heroes, whether you acknowledge that or not. These Olympians have proven their mettle. They are in a VERY exclusive club.

Olympic Portraits are not really the place for photographers (or art directors) to contemplate their navels with the drivel of "fine art" absurdism and purposely offensive imagery.

Like many here, the "portraits" by this hired hack are abysmally bad. That is without a doubt. Who cares about that. If that idiotic French "Photo Agency" wants to support morons like that, that's their business.

But what is so infuriating is that it was disrespectful and a hatchet job against HEROES. (Knucklehead!) Broadly speaking OR otherwise!

Regardless of nationality, these athletes deserve some modicum of respect for making their country's Olympic Team.

Why insult them?

Direct link | Posted on Jul 9, 2012 at 04:35 UTC
In reply to:

ALFREDofAVALON: The objections really have nothing to do with patriotism, but quality - aesthetics, visual grammar, protocol and respect are enough, without even bringing up the subject of patriotism and/or your disdain for patriotism.

His work is not inspiring, indeed. And if any subject should be depicted in an inspiring way, new, fresh, unique or otherwise, it is these athletes who are the very tops in human athletic achievement.

Who the heck thinks they have the right to denigrate their achievement with debasing them as common, by way of humiliating photographic depictions, under the phony guise of "unique or fresh?" They are anything but common. They are heroes, whether you acknowledge that or not. These Olympians have proven their mettle. They are in a VERY exclusive club.

Olympic Portraits are not really the place for photographers (or art directors) to contemplate their navels with the drivel of "fine art" absurdism and purposely offensive imagery.

Oh, I disagree. I personally accept the common sense view that as defined:

HERO - a person, typically a man, who is admired or idealized for courage, outstanding achievements, or noble qualities: a war hero.
• the chief male character in a book, play, or movie, who is typically identified with good qualities, and with whom the reader is expected to sympathize.

AShimon, how fast can YOU, your neighbor or anyone in you town run the hundred yard dash (100 meters)? Swim 100 meters? Can you even swim a 100 meters? Lift? Jump? Throw? Etc., etc., etc..

Everyone's a Star, these days, even you, huh?

I don't mean to be so harsh, but only to make a point. And that is, you are wrong. All of these athletes are heroes, compared to you and me and 99.9999 % of America, France or where ever you call home. And as such, they deserve heroic treatment, not this sniveling, "Oh. Hmph. They're not so great!" BS from winey nobodies sitting in Lazy Boys with dang Remotes in their hands.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 9, 2012 at 04:26 UTC

The objections really have nothing to do with patriotism, but quality - aesthetics, visual grammar, protocol and respect are enough, without even bringing up the subject of patriotism and/or your disdain for patriotism.

His work is not inspiring, indeed. And if any subject should be depicted in an inspiring way, new, fresh, unique or otherwise, it is these athletes who are the very tops in human athletic achievement.

Who the heck thinks they have the right to denigrate their achievement with debasing them as common, by way of humiliating photographic depictions, under the phony guise of "unique or fresh?" They are anything but common. They are heroes, whether you acknowledge that or not. These Olympians have proven their mettle. They are in a VERY exclusive club.

Olympic Portraits are not really the place for photographers (or art directors) to contemplate their navels with the drivel of "fine art" absurdism and purposely offensive imagery.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 9, 2012 at 01:45 UTC as 43rd comment | 13 replies
In reply to:

twstriving: I didn’t know Trey Hardee was a Special Olympian (see headline photo). In fact, I have no idea who Trey Hardee is.

Save your railing about Hollywood, beautiful people, politics, profit and all those other personal pet-peeves for other opinion venues more relevant to those topics. This is quality photography for quality subjects to an audience that has every reasonable expectation for quality presentations.

That Fine Art eventually seeps into Commercial Art is a given phenomenon, and to be appreciated as homage to artists. But sadly, the fine art of our time is infected with this morose, self-hatred flavor of the gross anti-aesthetic and absurdism that does not lift the spirit of the viewer, but is nothing less than visual vomiting of an Emperor with No Clothes. After 30, 40 or 50 years in the fine arts, don't you think we "got it" already?

Much more, it does not deserve a place in the Commercial milieu of Advertising, Fashion and Celebrity OR Olympic Portraits, in this country or any other. To the degree that it does - "Look Mommy. Why is the Emperor wearing no clothes?"

Direct link | Posted on Jul 9, 2012 at 01:25 UTC
In reply to:

twstriving: I didn’t know Trey Hardee was a Special Olympian (see headline photo). In fact, I have no idea who Trey Hardee is.

If you were invited to an Awards Ceremony for a highly competitive and exclusive Award, would YOU show up to your photo session for the Banquet Program, unshaven in a dirty coffee stained Tshirt? Not exact metaphor? OK, how about you showed up dressed to impress, suite and tie let's say, and the photographer shoots you from odd goof-ball angles, purposely unflattering lighting, and asks you to turn to the side lift up your shirt and stick out your belly; would you not think it odd? But the metaphor is not yet complete. Now you show up to the once-every-four-years Banquet to honor you as the VERY pinnacle of your profession - the top three of thousands competing for this reward YOU are up for, and you look in the Banquet Program and you see the most bazaar, unflattering, unprofessional (technical and professional) photos of you and your other Award Nominees. What would you think about that? Or further, what would your boss, all your co-workers and peers think about that? "Original?"

Direct link | Posted on Jul 9, 2012 at 01:01 UTC
In reply to:

twstriving: I didn’t know Trey Hardee was a Special Olympian (see headline photo). In fact, I have no idea who Trey Hardee is.

And this is not about make-up and making "beautiful," so called ugly people. Its a about respect for great achievement and a well wish of congratulations for beating all others for the honor and glory of representing the USA in the World Competition we call the Olympics.

AND BTW, it does not matter that they are from the USA. Any Olympic team from even the smallest of countries deserve respect for their achievement at getting to the pinnacle of their countries athletics. This has nothing to do with patriotism, however pejorative or not you wish to apply that in this case. This has to do with respect and protocol.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 9, 2012 at 00:52 UTC
In reply to:

twstriving: I didn’t know Trey Hardee was a Special Olympian (see headline photo). In fact, I have no idea who Trey Hardee is.

There you go with this hackneyed "Shock of the New" so called "modern art" (as in modernity) post classical dribble. "Original" does not necessarily mean quality. It can sometimes, but that does not make it quality. And BTW, "original" does not necessarily mean "honest."

These ARE special people and they deserved to be depicted in a special way. They are the top three athletes in each field of competition, from a country of 300 million people! I don't know why you feel that they need to be debased and brought down to some approachable or accessible level. When it comes to their given sport, they are not accessible! You, your neighbor, your cousin, your uncle and whoever else you think are safe in their regularity don't deserve parity with these athletes. (If you think you do, feel free to climb into the ring with any on the Olympic boxing team.)

Direct link | Posted on Jul 9, 2012 at 00:51 UTC
In reply to:

Bunk599: There is a time and place for creativity....two instances where respect and tradition should receive higher priority are singing the national anthem and photographing the USA Olympic Team.
So much of photography is about the privilege of access.....this guy was given access and failed on all accounts. As others point out, aside from the disrespectful composition the quality of the photos is stunningly poor.
I suspect Klamar took a giant step backwards in his career and his access to famous subjects will be restricted...

CFynn's link points out the contrast with what was possible and illustrates a far more appropriate use of the athletes time.

To each his own, but my vote is two big thumbs way down.

I very much agree. Protocol is still important.

Forgive the crass example, but would you overtly scratch you genitals in public? Or audibly pass gas in public in the same overt crude way?

If this is still a little too grey an area for you to consider for yourself?, how about the President of the US?, to give a very extreme example. What if you witnessed that?

This is the same thing. There's nothing old-fashioned, passé or UN-fresh about what is proper and what is not. These photos are as appallingly inappropriate as the above examples.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 8, 2012 at 06:27 UTC
In reply to:

nathaniel m: I find them refreshing and original. They seem to show more of the fun and grit of sports than the typical "all glory" shot.

"All glory" is another way of saying the ultimate in (Athletic) human achievement. So they should be ultimate and glorious portraits.

Fresh? Yes, by all means, but only if these ideas can be achieved. A photo of an athlete's big toe, might be fresh (unique), but is that really a relevant portrait of an athlete?

It might be compared to sending overweight middle-aged men to run the 100 yard dash? That may be "fresh," but America would not get any medals, and we would look foolish. Just like these "portraits."

Outstanding Form should follow Outstanding Function (or more to this discussion - Being) So we (everyone, whether you are a photo enthusiast or not) rightfully expects outstanding portraits of outstanding athletes.

That is why "we care."

Direct link | Posted on Jul 8, 2012 at 06:14 UTC
In reply to:

Jeff Greenberg: There is a deep meaning behind these images:

we are now in the digital age where anyone with
a fully automated camera can be a professional photographer

And thats part of the rub. This seemingly total novice produces amateurish work and gets paid for it.

Sheeesh.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 8, 2012 at 05:43 UTC
In reply to:

whyamihere: My response to all of this is about as mundane as the reason for this so-called fiasco:

The only people who even seem to give a darn are photo enthusiasts. I read a lot of news sites during the course of my day, and the first time I heard about this whatnot was when it appeared on the DPR site. (In fact, it's the top Google hit. Further down the results is Yahoo! Sports and Slate headlines that effectively read: "Should we care?")

To borrow the words of John Oliver, there's proper news, celebrity news, news about strange things that pets do to beat the heat (it's hot here in the States), a second look around just to make sure nobody missed any other news about celebrities, pets, or the heat, then comes the Olympics, and then - just maybe - someone might report about this silliness.

Really, nobody but a small handful of people actually noticed.

What is a Portrait to you?

What should be Portraits of the US Olympic Team?

These are the questions of great import here. This is much more than what "photo enthusiasts" care or don't care about.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 8, 2012 at 05:40 UTC
In reply to:

xtoph: i am sympathetic to the plight of the photographer. poor information (let's stipulate that wasn't his fault), piled on top of very difficult circumstances (too many people, not enough time).

but:

these are inexcusably poor quality photos. not because they are insufficiently 'patriotic' (irrelevant) or because they follow a unique artistic vision (please). it isn't really a subjective or even aesthetic matter. the problem is bad technique: wildly oof shots, unbelievably badly framed shots (body parts arbitrarily cut off), and extremely badly exposed shots (blown skin on the face, or insufficient exposure). even without preparation, a photographer should be able to get consistent results, at a minimum.

if pictures are worth 1000 words, then a pro photog should be fluent in the language. what we see isn't a personal dialect or style, it's poor grammar, to the point where there is no way to tell what the pics are supposed to say.

so of course it is photo news. it's embarrassing.

Sharpening applied; low compression? Are you kidding? Sharpening are no sharpening. If they are out of focus, they are out of focus.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 8, 2012 at 05:34 UTC
In reply to:

xtoph: i am sympathetic to the plight of the photographer. poor information (let's stipulate that wasn't his fault), piled on top of very difficult circumstances (too many people, not enough time).

but:

these are inexcusably poor quality photos. not because they are insufficiently 'patriotic' (irrelevant) or because they follow a unique artistic vision (please). it isn't really a subjective or even aesthetic matter. the problem is bad technique: wildly oof shots, unbelievably badly framed shots (body parts arbitrarily cut off), and extremely badly exposed shots (blown skin on the face, or insufficient exposure). even without preparation, a photographer should be able to get consistent results, at a minimum.

if pictures are worth 1000 words, then a pro photog should be fluent in the language. what we see isn't a personal dialect or style, it's poor grammar, to the point where there is no way to tell what the pics are supposed to say.

so of course it is photo news. it's embarrassing.

Exactly

Direct link | Posted on Jul 8, 2012 at 05:31 UTC
In reply to:

Lng0004: DPR chooses to post what's probably the worst shot of the bunch. If people only take a look at this one shot before commenting, then yes, it's absolutely crap.

But take a look at the entire collection. It's not that bad.

You mean there was stuff worse than this?

Direct link | Posted on Jul 8, 2012 at 05:30 UTC
In reply to:

Enjoyatoy: Go Joe!

I have never heard of Joe, but I am amazed at the attention this has drawn.

The man was hired.

He produced some unique work.

From what I read, a large number of his photos were picked up; which likely was his client's objective.

If all photographers produced the same work, we wouldn't need so many, and we would likely be bored with all the repetition.

It is hard to imagine how I would feel if everyone "Klammered" over my work after I met my client's objectives. (sorry Joe, I couldn't resist)

I wonder if he will now continue with what is now some signature work that HAS SOLD, or fold to the critics. AFP appears to be happy. If I were him, I think I would keep experimenting until AFP says different. Follow the money.

Unique work may or may not have anything to do with Portraiture.

Ah, "the client's objective." Well your honor, that goes to motive!

"Signature work" "Keep experimenting" - There's the paradox and the problem.

Follow the money. That's going to be hard, when like stumbling into a room where people started throwing spontaneously throwing money at him and says, "how in the hell did I get here?"

Direct link | Posted on Jul 8, 2012 at 05:29 UTC
Total: 41, showing: 21 – 40
« First‹ Previous123Next ›Last »