keepreal

keepreal

Lives in United Kingdom Enfield, United Kingdom
Works as a Retired, was Information Technology Manager
Joined on Mar 24, 2007
About me:

Amateur with a passion for pictorial photography of more than fifty years.

Comments

Total: 175, showing: 61 – 80
« First‹ Previous23456Next ›Last »
On article Olympus OM-D E-M5 II Review (857 comments in total)

How good is the EVF, really? If only Olympus were to make a MFT camera with an optical viewfinder roughly the size and weight as in the full frame OM1 film camera.

EVFs are never going to come close to that, but is this one similar or better than the VF-4 or more like the EVF in the Fuji XE-2? The former is poor but bearable, I have one, but the latter is dreadful.

This trend to EVFs by all the leading manufacturers is a substantial backwards step, just as lenses with wild native barrel distortion.

Taking pictures with an EVF makes the job much more difficult to get right than with an optical viewfinder. Why do all the serious reviewers of cameras make light of EVFs and their deficiencies as if they are a real contender in a compact with interchangeable lenses versus a decent DSLR?

Visit http://www.ipernity.com/home/contrajur, especially in the albums for South Western USA and Slovenia. Most shots there with a DSLR. Using an EVF for them would not have been a pleasant experience.

Link | Posted on Mar 19, 2015 at 09:01 UTC as 152nd comment | 13 replies
On article Raw processing on Android devices with Photo Mate R2 (76 comments in total)

IMO, a tablet is useful for checking shots while in the field but for proper processing, most sensible people will want to wait until they get home, then do the processing proper on their PCs or MACs. Moreover, like me with a Nexus 7 and limited storage with no micro slot, they may not want to clutter up tablet space with large RAW files.

In those circumstances, Nexus Media Importer is ideal because you can look at the embedded JPEGs from the RAW files without downloading anything onto your tablet. If you do not have the ability to judge your images from a JPEG preview and what is possible once you get to work on the RAW images proper, then I hasten to add that your skills and experience may not be up to using RAW to good effect anyway. That is especially so if you bracketed exposures as many RAW users do.

Who wants RAW on their tablet except for a preview? It makes little sense to invest in a quality camera only to limit the standard of the output by modifying images on a tablet.

Link | Posted on Jan 22, 2014 at 08:38 UTC as 5th comment | 1 reply
On article Sigma USB Dock quick review (145 comments in total)

This is another example of technology getting out of hand. As I went digital, I had to familiarise myself with all sorts of concepts only to subsequently dispose of most of them, like having twenty two subject modes, none of which are needed for serious photography where the camera operator still knows what he is doing and remains in control.

I am not saying that this Sigma device is unnecessary, just that it ought to be in the labs of manufacturers. If one is using high quality equipment where fine tuning to this degree makes sense, for the exorbitant amounts one has to pay, let them get it right before the user gets to buy anything or, if we are talking about an option like adjusting the autofocus seek range, let them build that into the camera to adjust, where it should be in the first place, so that one is not stuck with one setting per shooting session.

Everything now is becoming so unnecessarily complicated that soon you will need training just to suck eggs.

Link | Posted on Aug 13, 2013 at 06:51 UTC as 37th comment | 8 replies

Judging from readers of DP Review in particular, quite a number of people replace their expensive equipment merely because there is a new model. Of course, a few do so legitimately because they do need the new features. And sometimes the improvements are not just marketing or splitting hairs.

But I am quite sure that the overwhelming majority never take pictures of sufficient quality or reproduce them in way that justifies the original outlay, let alone for the replacements.

It is all a part of the consumer society, this mad acquisition as a way of life.

If you wonder if I am as guilty as the people I am criticising, you will have some difficulty because, after a mere sixty years as an amateur photographer I have little to show for myself. I throw most of it away. That is because I have no time for the dreadful stuff I see everywhere, including among my own efforts!

However, I have kept a few of my best, some of the most recent being at http://www.ipernity.com/doc/contrajur/album.

Link | Posted on Jul 11, 2013 at 14:13 UTC as 22nd comment | 5 replies
On article Photoshop CC: Adobe responds to reaction (1852 comments in total)
In reply to:

AngryCorgi: None of this matters to me. I'm still running CS2 and am perfectly happy.

I totally agree - except that when I upgrade my PC at some point will CS2 be compatible with the latest version of Windows?

If not, what I would like is either to keep my old PC just to run CS2 on it or buy two new machines and keep Photoshop on one of them with XP as the operating system. Achieving that might be an initial problem because all recent PCs seem to have this hidden partition from which to restore a vanilla setup should you need to and clearing this out and installing XP without it is complicated by not having a floppy drive from which to boot any more.

My belief is that there is a conspiracy on all machines to slow the processor chip over time. Otherwise I'd always choose to go for keeping an old machine on which to run CS2 except for that.

Every machine I have ever owned always slows down over time, even with a complete reinstall. I also notice that every one often hangs even now for several seconds at a time and I do not believe I have a virus that is responsible.

Link | Posted on May 8, 2013 at 10:28 UTC
On article Photoshop CC: Adobe responds to reaction (1852 comments in total)

Adobe is only interested in making money. I hate Lightroom, not least of all because I do not want to use a catalogue when a hierarchy of folders gives me all the organisation I need and I can also use that for all my other image applications.

It has been pretty obvious to me that the development of different versions of CS had been an exercise more in marketing than in product development. I like the clean uncluttered GUI of CS2 but I hate the confusion of too much on screen with later versions. I also believe that most of what I need to do with my photos is no easier with later versions. The point it that it takes a lot of practice to learn how to use any version, so I am quite happy being out of date.

I was lucky enough to win a free copy of CS2 some years ago, especially since the cost of Photoshop even then was way too high for an amateur on a sensible budget was prepared to spend. Up until then, I had been using Elements 2 and I won CS2 by showing what I cold do with it!

Link | Posted on May 8, 2013 at 09:42 UTC as 542nd comment
On article Just Posted: Nikon D7100 Hands-On Preview (311 comments in total)
In reply to:

sunkenbranch: Where is the monitor cover!! I think they eliminated that. Make the LCD bigger and not protect it. Brilliant.

Sorry - my entry below the next entry was intended to be a reply to this!

Link | Posted on Feb 24, 2013 at 19:39 UTC
On article Just Posted: Nikon D7100 Hands-On Preview (311 comments in total)
In reply to:

mbrobich: Have to wonder if the buffer increases if you use the "M" 12MP setting ? Hopefully it does.

Especially if the LCD is welded into the back and the whole of that would have to be replaced. See what iFixit say about that in regard to the D600:

See http://www.ifixit.com/Teardown/Nikon+D600+Teardown/10708/2

"We were disappointed to find that the LCD is fused to the rear case, and cannot be replaced without replacing the entire panel.

If you scratch or crack the display glass on an older Nikon DSLR like the D90, it's possible to find an inexpensive replacement and fix it yourself. With the inseparable glass, though, D600 users will definitely want to opt for some type of screen protection."

Link | Posted on Feb 24, 2013 at 17:56 UTC
On article Just Posted: Nikon D7100 Hands-On Preview (311 comments in total)

Those of us who say that the D7100 is not the legitimate successor to the D300s might be interested to learn that according to Businessweek Feb 7 Nikon are having financial problems. This might also have a bearing in problems with the D600 and lead to other quality issues. Let's hope not.

See http://www.businessweek.com/news/2013-02-06/nikon-plunges-most-since-1985-after-forecast-cut-tokyo-mover

"Nikon Corp., Japan’s third-biggest camera-maker, plunged the most since 1985 in Tokyo trading after cutting its profit forecast because of slowing demand in Europe and falling prices.

The company dropped 19 percent to 2,139 yen at the close. That was the biggest decline among the 225 members of the Nikkei 225 Stock Average."

Link | Posted on Feb 24, 2013 at 17:52 UTC as 11th comment | 2 replies
On article Nikon issues service advisory on D600's dust issue (240 comments in total)
In reply to:

daciangroza: I do architectural photography mostly at f/8-f/11 with a D600 and even though oil spots are visible in the top left corner when shooting a white wall, I have never had a problem with them in real photos.

I'll send the camera in sometime for cleaning and I'm curious if they'll show up again. My guess is that they won't. From what I read the shutter splutters oil on the sensor when the camera is new and stops after the excess oil is off the mechanisms. I don't worry too much about it, I found imperfections in all my gear. Nothing is flawless, unfortunately.

Your suggestion of Copper Hill is very reassuring as they give very detailed information. I have always been very careful to avoid external dirt getting into the camera body from outside, as I explain a little more just below, so far with complete success. Of course, if the source is within the camera no amount of care is going to help.

One of my concerns has been the risk of doing more harm than good by ever going near the plate in front of the sensor but, if the need arises, Copper Hill instructions avoid the need for guesswork on precisely how to go about it.

Link | Posted on Feb 22, 2013 at 23:12 UTC
On article Nikon issues service advisory on D600's dust issue (240 comments in total)

I have a Nikon D300 and a D5000. Once I had to gently blow away a speck of dust in the viewfinder of the D300 but that is all. In three years I have never even had to use the sensor cleaning utility built into either camera. I am always very careful when changing lenses, mind.

This just suggests as I have commented upon elsewhere at DP Review, specifically the preview of the D7100 that Nikon may be cutting back on quality, at least in its more recent cheaper and mid-range DSLRs. Some of the comments below also suggest the same thing.

Of course I have no proof but the general trends do make me and some other commentators at DP Review suspicious. In the case of the D7100, the reason for this is that it replaces the D300/D300s while in most respects it is more like the next range down, indeed the D7000. The only thing they defintely have in common is the price. Less features and less quality for the same price?

Link | Posted on Feb 22, 2013 at 20:23 UTC as 84th comment
On article Nikon posts sample images from new D7100 (95 comments in total)
In reply to:

keepreal: Why are such galleries almost always such a joke? I think it is because the providers are far too lazy to do the job properly. Unfortunately, that also includes DP Review.

The pictures in the Nikon 6-image sample gallery have to be the worst selection I have ever seen. Usually the selection DP Review provides is pretty poor too but this is a new low, so much so I have not even bothered to download the full size images to take a closer look.

One needs a good amount of detail and colour to judge sharpness, distortion and chromatic aberrations right into the corners and at a typical distance one might use for taking real pictures.

DP Review uses a standard indoors setup but but why, oh why show a closeup of a coin in which the colours are limited and the sharpness of the minted coin original so inadequate to judge by?

Their out of doors shots from one review to another are never the same, so making a judgement about the results is always a case of comparing apples and oranges.

Interesting replies already:

Revenant, you are perfectly correct - only I would choose real-world sample images like that part in sunlight of one of mine at http://www.flickr.com/photos/contrajur/8360729475/in/set-72157632473974640/

(Click on it to see it larger.)

With that kind of image you'd really be able to make a significant judgement - not with the even toned wing of a plane and no detail on it apart from the edges. And on your point about different conditions for different reviews I'd agree if you said different kinds of apple!

In the close-ups, they could have chosen something better than the coin to start you off with in the first place so you could just view as is!

IMO Hugo808 is spot on - prosumer cameras are all so good it is splitting hairs from a practical point of view. Clever point about the missing LOPF. So much for what marike6 thinks – Nikon can do no wrong!

Link | Posted on Feb 22, 2013 at 15:13 UTC
On article Nikon posts sample images from new D7100 (95 comments in total)
In reply to:

yabokkie: good lenses,
but it's very unefficient shooting APS-C with full-frame lenses,
but it's more difficult to make same good lenses for APS-C DSLRs
at the same quality and cost, that APS-C DSLRs deserve to die.

btw, 24.00MP DX translates to 56.56MP FX, that we know there should be no problem we go double D800, and maybe quad D800 resolutions.

I totally agree with Digitall, just above. When I moved from film to digital, I was glad to have some good FX lenses and kept them all.

The only DX I have is the Nikkor 18-55mm VR along with a D5000 body which I sometimes use instead of my D300 and three FX lenses as collectively the latter are very heavy.

Most APSC or smaller provide noticeable distortion. In many DX, distortion is downright ridiculous. If not for that I would have bought a 4/3 as a second camera but instead got the D5000. Other than cutting off the edges, maybe that's no worry if you use jpeg or a RAW developer that uses the Nikon profiles, but I do not, as others out there give superior tonal mapping.

In Digital, the DX format has its advantages for those who realise that the resolution already is more than good enough even for large blow-ups. That also gives the advantage that FX lenses on DX bodies only use the centre of their coverage, delivering good edge sharpness and next to no vignetting either.

Link | Posted on Feb 22, 2013 at 11:31 UTC
On article Nikon posts sample images from new D7100 (95 comments in total)

Why are such galleries almost always such a joke? I think it is because the providers are far too lazy to do the job properly. Unfortunately, that also includes DP Review.

The pictures in the Nikon 6-image sample gallery have to be the worst selection I have ever seen. Usually the selection DP Review provides is pretty poor too but this is a new low, so much so I have not even bothered to download the full size images to take a closer look.

One needs a good amount of detail and colour to judge sharpness, distortion and chromatic aberrations right into the corners and at a typical distance one might use for taking real pictures.

DP Review uses a standard indoors setup but but why, oh why show a closeup of a coin in which the colours are limited and the sharpness of the minted coin original so inadequate to judge by?

Their out of doors shots from one review to another are never the same, so making a judgement about the results is always a case of comparing apples and oranges.

Link | Posted on Feb 22, 2013 at 11:06 UTC as 12th comment | 7 replies

I note there is a review of the D600 but I will not bother reading it. Maybe DP Review could flag up equipment which is jerry built and make a habit of telling us at the outset to save wasting our time.

I usually like to read the more interesting articles at DP Review even though I am quite happy with my D300 and regularly get quality more than adequate for prints about 2 ft long. That's just as well because there is no way I would get a D600 if its build is such crap. I suspect Nikon are building to the market and lowering quality favouring their profit margins, unconcerned except with their top professional grade equipment.

Link | Posted on Dec 17, 2012 at 16:33 UTC as 2nd comment

Sounds to me as though iFixit.com have taken apart Nikon. At the prices you pay for these high end cameras, you are entitled to expect a lot better than this.

Link | Posted on Nov 8, 2012 at 20:20 UTC as 29th comment | 3 replies
On article Nikon unveils 24.1MP D5200 DSLR with optional Wi-Fi (392 comments in total)
In reply to:

keepreal: Can someone tell me how to change my display name to havalarf? If not I shall have to stop commenting here.

I have given up taking DP Review seriously. I do have a look here from time to time curious about the new thrown at us. A lot of it is pointless but the march of science and technology is wonderful, the appetite for manufacturers to design and sell anything and the public to spend money like there is no tomorrow.

But as for the reader comments, i get the impression that the majority of these guys should be in a psychiatric ward.

With my D300, D5000, three zoom lenses covering from 12mm to 300m between them, an Epson 3880 printer and the ability to use my smart TV to display in HD directly from a connected PC, I am all set for the rest of my days even if by the time I am on my death bed they are making cameras with 640 mp, lenses with barrel distortion of 80%.

I have taken some really good pictures with my equipment while many here are bent on talking nonsense, nothing else.

Yes of course because I like to listen to music, especially classical music and that's what most albums still come on.

Besides, the CDs are very useful when you reseed your lawn. Stretch strings across with CDs on them suspended from sticks stuck in the turf and that frightens the birds away as they move in the breeze. For some reason DVDs do no work as well. It must be something to do with the dual layer making them catch the light less. I have tried + and - but it makes no difference.

You'd know about that sort of thing, wouldn't you Antonio?

Link | Posted on Nov 7, 2012 at 00:25 UTC
On article Nikon unveils 24.1MP D5200 DSLR with optional Wi-Fi (392 comments in total)
In reply to:

keepreal: Can someone tell me how to change my display name to havalarf? If not I shall have to stop commenting here.

I have given up taking DP Review seriously. I do have a look here from time to time curious about the new thrown at us. A lot of it is pointless but the march of science and technology is wonderful, the appetite for manufacturers to design and sell anything and the public to spend money like there is no tomorrow.

But as for the reader comments, i get the impression that the majority of these guys should be in a psychiatric ward.

With my D300, D5000, three zoom lenses covering from 12mm to 300m between them, an Epson 3880 printer and the ability to use my smart TV to display in HD directly from a connected PC, I am all set for the rest of my days even if by the time I am on my death bed they are making cameras with 640 mp, lenses with barrel distortion of 80%.

I have taken some really good pictures with my equipment while many here are bent on talking nonsense, nothing else.

3 years old, so Francis Carver thinks that means golden oldie. Utter madness. Things have progressed in that time but not by enough that it actually matters. For example, unless you make huge prints can you actually tell apart 600 DPI from 300? I doubt it.

I have a CD player that I bought about 25 years ago, the Denon DCD-1700 which at the time was their second model. Since then the technology has changed and on paper the specs may look better but I defy anyone whose says mine in a near audiofile system is not a match in practical terms even today.

You have exactly the same in photography except these paranoid individuals thinks real change is near to instantaneous. Most assuredly, it is not.

Link | Posted on Nov 6, 2012 at 21:23 UTC
On article Nikon unveils 24.1MP D5200 DSLR with optional Wi-Fi (392 comments in total)

Can someone tell me how to change my display name to havalarf? If not I shall have to stop commenting here.

I have given up taking DP Review seriously. I do have a look here from time to time curious about the new thrown at us. A lot of it is pointless but the march of science and technology is wonderful, the appetite for manufacturers to design and sell anything and the public to spend money like there is no tomorrow.

But as for the reader comments, i get the impression that the majority of these guys should be in a psychiatric ward.

With my D300, D5000, three zoom lenses covering from 12mm to 300m between them, an Epson 3880 printer and the ability to use my smart TV to display in HD directly from a connected PC, I am all set for the rest of my days even if by the time I am on my death bed they are making cameras with 640 mp, lenses with barrel distortion of 80%.

I have taken some really good pictures with my equipment while many here are bent on talking nonsense, nothing else.

Link | Posted on Nov 6, 2012 at 17:33 UTC as 50th comment | 4 replies
Total: 175, showing: 61 – 80
« First‹ Previous23456Next ›Last »