Cal22

Cal22

Joined on Aug 18, 2012

Comments

Total: 84, showing: 21 – 40
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On Happy Holidays from dpreview news story (117 comments in total)

Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays to the DPreview team!
I appreciate your helpful information and supporting advice.

Best wishes to you and to all visitors here!

Direct link | Posted on Dec 25, 2013 at 23:02 UTC as 39th comment
On Keweenaw Sunset Breakers in the Sunset in the beach VII challenge (11 comments in total)

Great picture!

Direct link | Posted on Dec 5, 2013 at 14:07 UTC as 8th comment
On Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX7 Review preview (548 comments in total)
In reply to:

ArnfinnP: I've had my GX7 for a week tomorrow, and have stumbled on a rather interesting problem. In semi dark conditions I sometime get a strong stripy pattern in my pictures, especially when shot with a high ISO. An example is here: www.flickr.com/photos/arnfinnp/11131880726/in/pool-228956.... It was shot with an ISO 800 and f2 at 1/200.

These stipes where not there, though there were patterns of light and dark than might have been accentuated. I had the same problem yesterday, when taking pictures indoors during a lecture: Strong stripes that clearly was not there from the beginning. It looks like a moiré problem to me, probably due to the lack of a anti aliasing filter.

Look for 'Silent Mode' in the chapter 'Features' and what the electronic shutter may do in artificial light!

Direct link | Posted on Dec 2, 2013 at 10:08 UTC
In reply to:

WeddingEtCetera Com: Today, the DMC-GM1 is in my hands. It is almost too small. An element begins to bother me. It is impossible to place a quick release plate for photo or video tripod with another lens than the Panasonic 12-32 or 14. With the Olympus 17 mm, it is limit. Direction La Grand Bibliothèque de Paris behind my home.
I am surprised by the reactivity of the DMC-GM1. It is immediate. Faster than the DMC-GH3. The touch-sensitive screen is reactive too. Even too much. Take care where you put fingers. Too low on the screen, you modify the white balance without being careful. The screen glorifies the images but without betraying them really. What you see is what you will get …
Return at home. The editing is also simple as for the DMC-GH3. The audio dubbing is essential. The audio recording is mediocre. To use only indoor.
Now it just needs a nice case to carry the DMC-GM1. Enjoy your Panasonic.

Film Video Test Review on > http://vimeo.com/80144049

You want a quick release system for your GM1 (suitable also for bigger cameras)? The german firm Novoflex produces MiniConnect, which works with a relatively small disc at the camera's bottom. You can check it out by means of a 1Euro coin, the diameter of which comes very close to that of the MiniConnect disc.
But don't forget: Deciding on the GM1's optional grip is deciding against a quick release system. And vice versa.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 25, 2013 at 21:29 UTC
In reply to:

WeddingEtCetera Com: Today, the DMC-GM1 is in my hands. It is almost too small. An element begins to bother me. It is impossible to place a quick release plate for photo or video tripod with another lens than the Panasonic 12-32 or 14. With the Olympus 17 mm, it is limit. Direction La Grand Bibliothèque de Paris behind my home.
I am surprised by the reactivity of the DMC-GM1. It is immediate. Faster than the DMC-GH3. The touch-sensitive screen is reactive too. Even too much. Take care where you put fingers. Too low on the screen, you modify the white balance without being careful. The screen glorifies the images but without betraying them really. What you see is what you will get …
Return at home. The editing is also simple as for the DMC-GH3. The audio dubbing is essential. The audio recording is mediocre. To use only indoor.
Now it just needs a nice case to carry the DMC-GM1. Enjoy your Panasonic.

Film Video Test Review on > http://vimeo.com/80144049

Sorry for giving you a wrong advice: Since the optional grip has no provision for a tripod mounting, it won't allow a quick release to be added.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 24, 2013 at 04:00 UTC
In reply to:

WeddingEtCetera Com: Today, the DMC-GM1 is in my hands. It is almost too small. An element begins to bother me. It is impossible to place a quick release plate for photo or video tripod with another lens than the Panasonic 12-32 or 14. With the Olympus 17 mm, it is limit. Direction La Grand Bibliothèque de Paris behind my home.
I am surprised by the reactivity of the DMC-GM1. It is immediate. Faster than the DMC-GH3. The touch-sensitive screen is reactive too. Even too much. Take care where you put fingers. Too low on the screen, you modify the white balance without being careful. The screen glorifies the images but without betraying them really. What you see is what you will get …
Return at home. The editing is also simple as for the DMC-GH3. The audio dubbing is essential. The audio recording is mediocre. To use only indoor.
Now it just needs a nice case to carry the DMC-GM1. Enjoy your Panasonic.

Film Video Test Review on > http://vimeo.com/80144049

Hello,

maybe combined with its special grip you will be able to mount a quick release plate!

Direct link | Posted on Nov 23, 2013 at 23:26 UTC
In reply to:

Cal22: Be honest, Allison, it's the look of the GM1 you couldn't withstand; that's why it's your Gear of the Year! This tiny thing is like a gem that wakes desire, isn't it?

The GM1 is the beauty queen of the compacts - and yet it allows interchangeable lenses. These technical features it houses are impressive indeed, but will it keep what it promises? Will this small camera prove fiddly when it comes to shooting? Is it prone to shake because it's a lightweight? Many customers will likely be happy with a GM1 as a point and shoot only. But Panasonic should not ignore the needs of serious photographers and therefore improve the camera if necessary. An optional (silver?) EVF would be nice, too.

millardmt: Your kind of reaction on my comments is a little weird, in my view!

The GM1 has not yet been reviewed, the tiny zoom either. What makes Allison prefer this camera as her Gear of the Year, anyway? 'It fits easily in my purse', she writes, 'it fits into my life!. She has found a companion to take pictures with 'on an everyday basis'. I strongly support such personal and practical view!
There's still a question: Why not a RX100 II or a E-PM2 or ..? I suspect, Allison stands for many of us (incl. me) who are attracted by the wonderful appearance of this new camera. There's nothing wrong with it. Panasonic is successfully changing the scene with a GM1 that turns out to be a wooing little thing indeed.

Allison is not selling her DSLR and stepping over to the Panasonic system; she keeps her DSLR. Her decision for the GM1 as a second camera is not suitable for anyone. More information and a camera review might help others to make a decision. That's what DPReview is for, isn't it?

Direct link | Posted on Nov 23, 2013 at 06:49 UTC
In reply to:

Cal22: Be honest, Allison, it's the look of the GM1 you couldn't withstand; that's why it's your Gear of the Year! This tiny thing is like a gem that wakes desire, isn't it?

The GM1 is the beauty queen of the compacts - and yet it allows interchangeable lenses. These technical features it houses are impressive indeed, but will it keep what it promises? Will this small camera prove fiddly when it comes to shooting? Is it prone to shake because it's a lightweight? Many customers will likely be happy with a GM1 as a point and shoot only. But Panasonic should not ignore the needs of serious photographers and therefore improve the camera if necessary. An optional (silver?) EVF would be nice, too.

stevens37y:
Read the Olympus E-P5 review: Image Quality, Camera/Image shake! I also remember a review of a Panasonic camera that had its problems with image blürring caused by the kit lens.

The miniaturization of a system camera is a wonderful thing. Camera reviews should find out whether there is a price to pay in form of handling and image issues.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 21, 2013 at 17:02 UTC

Be honest, Allison, it's the look of the GM1 you couldn't withstand; that's why it's your Gear of the Year! This tiny thing is like a gem that wakes desire, isn't it?

The GM1 is the beauty queen of the compacts - and yet it allows interchangeable lenses. These technical features it houses are impressive indeed, but will it keep what it promises? Will this small camera prove fiddly when it comes to shooting? Is it prone to shake because it's a lightweight? Many customers will likely be happy with a GM1 as a point and shoot only. But Panasonic should not ignore the needs of serious photographers and therefore improve the camera if necessary. An optional (silver?) EVF would be nice, too.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 21, 2013 at 07:06 UTC as 39th comment | 6 replies
On Toroweap Drop Off in the Grand Canyon challenge (1 comment in total)

David Muench shot from the same viewpoint, didn't he?

Direct link | Posted on Nov 18, 2013 at 06:44 UTC as 1st comment
On Grand Canyon in Winter in the Grand Canyon challenge (3 comments in total)
In reply to:

Cal22: I like your picture of a landscape: All elements combined in rhythm and structure from foreground to background. It's no dramatic scene, no hell of a light, just a sunny winterday. I guess it was cold out there. Did you smell the pine?

Yes, the early hours might reward the photographer!

Be aware, though, that HDR can be counterproductive! Your composition is built on contrast: In the foreground trunks, dark and vertical, frame the background, bright with horizontal lines. HDR reduces contrast.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 15, 2013 at 03:58 UTC
On DPReview Gear of the Year - Part 1: Fujifilm X100S article (306 comments in total)

I appreciate Barney Britton's somewhat personal approach to his Fujifilm X100S! Camera reviews can have a misleading effect on their readers, making them look for the best camera to buy. But they all have their advantages and disadvantages, and what might be "the best" one now, will be surpassed by a better one very soon; the race in the market is getting faster and faster.

Barney Britton makes it very clear, that instead of a heavy weight equipment to carry he likes his small X100S and has fun with it. So, look for a camera that suits you and your specific needs! By the way, a camera can be more than just a thing to use, it can be kind of a companion to you, similar to the relationship between a musician and his instrument. And the better your pictures, the more you'll like your companion!

Direct link | Posted on Nov 14, 2013 at 05:00 UTC as 17th comment
On Grand Canyon in Winter in the Grand Canyon challenge (3 comments in total)

I like your picture of a landscape: All elements combined in rhythm and structure from foreground to background. It's no dramatic scene, no hell of a light, just a sunny winterday. I guess it was cold out there. Did you smell the pine?

Direct link | Posted on Nov 13, 2013 at 06:26 UTC as 1st comment | 2 replies
On Panasonic DMC-GM1 preview (639 comments in total)

The new GM1 is a beautiful piece of camera design, indeed! And you have a FourThird sensor in that tiny thing. Furthermore, you can change the lens and select from an array of high quality lenses; new ones are announced already by Leitz as well as by SchneiderKreuznach. You will be happy with the GM1, I guess, if you can do without an EVF - unfortunately I can't!

I'm surprised though at the lack of resolution the Sony RX100 II shows in the studio scene here: Click on the extreme corners of the scene and you will see what I mean! I'm wondering, is it a flaw of the Zeiss-lens or is it unprecisely aligning of the shooting camera?

Direct link | Posted on Nov 9, 2013 at 02:30 UTC as 21st comment | 1 reply

Old-fashioned B&W is wonderfully contrasting with the cafe's name.

And such image quality with aperture wide open? Wow!

Direct link | Posted on Nov 7, 2013 at 03:26 UTC as 2nd comment
In reply to:

Cal22: Capa's approach to this lucky shot (I'm not cynical!) is similar to how Cartier Bresson made his famous shot of a pedestrian jumping over a puddle. Looking at his photograph makes you think of "The Decisive Moment", but the photographer had actually not seen what he was photographing there. He was standing behind a wooden wall and the hole in it was just big enough for the lens of his Leica. The photo was made by luck!

Generally speaking you might be right. But in my view Capa and Cartier Bresson were not of that kind of photographers. They made good photos, because they photographed much. They had their skills in recognizing scenes to catch for a picture. And photographing people gave them pictures with 'human interest', that sell well.
In YouTube videos you can see Cartier Bresson photographing: walking down the street, carrying his Leica, maybe talking to someone and suddenly taking a picture in point and shoot mode; casually as it seems. Cartier Bresson gave the film rolls to 'his' lab technician, who , as far as I know, by himself decided which shots to work out.

It's always the public and the market who want myths. Myths on photographers can be supportive in aiming to establish Photography as an art. But such myths aren't always helpful if you want to become a good photographer yourself.

Capa's photo is an icon that made Capa an idol. To question the photographer is not unfair!

Direct link | Posted on Nov 5, 2013 at 07:03 UTC
In reply to:

fad: I don't think it matters much whether this photo was faked.

Why? What makes this photo memorable is not its documentary quality, but that it captures the idea of war in general, and of this war in this place and time in particular. No one cares, outside of the photo, who the subject was. And no one is using it for forensic purposes.

The Iliad is still the supreme poem of war, even if there never were an Achilles, or a Hector, or a Priam or a Helen. Why? It captures the idea of war in all its complexity, its glory and its horror. An inferior poem that was historically accurate would not be as great.

Many of the great street photos we admire were faked. But they have artistic truth.

Now if Muybridge faked his horses or George Roger has created a fake death camp, that would be a different matter. But here the reality of what happened does not matter.

I'm not sure whether our common view at The Iliad is right. We don't even understand contemporary Modern Art, it's more a believe it or not, isn't it? And since we are so far away from Homer's world, how can we assume that we understand what he told his coevals in his artistic way? History of Ideas is a history of misunderstandings and of belief - in some respect. By way of example: 'War Of The Worlds" by H.G. Wells, wellknown as novel and as movie, is understood as a story about the invasion by Martians. But Wells was a sociologist and in my view his novel is a metaphor of the industrial revolution with the very sudden beginning of machine age changing the old world into a new world.
You're right though that Capa's photo has become part of the world of ideas, part of our cultural heritage so to say, therefore the question of his photo is fake or not is without any matter.
But this website is for photographers and many of them do want to know what the famous Capa did and how he did it.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 3, 2013 at 21:29 UTC

Capa's approach to this lucky shot (I'm not cynical!) is similar to how Cartier Bresson made his famous shot of a pedestrian jumping over a puddle. Looking at his photograph makes you think of "The Decisive Moment", but the photographer had actually not seen what he was photographing there. He was standing behind a wooden wall and the hole in it was just big enough for the lens of his Leica. The photo was made by luck!

Direct link | Posted on Nov 3, 2013 at 17:53 UTC as 19th comment | 2 replies
On Panasonic DMC-GM1 preview (639 comments in total)

The GM1 is so cute - especially the orange/silver version! And the image quality is visibly better than the one that comes out of the RX100 by about same body size. I think, it's the sensor size that makes the difference here.

I could imagine having two of these cutes combined with the new Leica lenses to be announced. But without an optional EVF such a camera can only be a toy, a point and shoot thing, I'm not interested in. I could do without an built-in flash, but not without an EVf. Sorry, Panasonic!

Direct link | Posted on Nov 2, 2013 at 01:58 UTC as 32nd comment
On Sony QX100 preview (155 comments in total)

I guess it's the beginning of a long and successful story. Today maybe a toy for smartphone enthusiasts, tomorrow a tool for the pros with bigger lenses and intermountable sensor/processor units. You won't have to buy cameras anymore in order to keep pace with electronic progress.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 14, 2013 at 00:55 UTC as 30th comment
Total: 84, showing: 21 – 40
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