Cal22

Cal22

Joined on Aug 18, 2012

Comments

Total: 107, showing: 1 – 20
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On Sigma announces dp1 Quattro article (197 comments in total)
In reply to:

munro harrap: There will be stillife studio and landscapes types who will love it, but it is impractical for reportage-completely.When do we get the choice of an EVF? The image quality from the DP2 is wonderful, but is the DP1Quattro's lens a vast improvement on the DP1 Merrills, because it was not at all a good lens
I would need to know how many hours I can leave the battery running before it dies.
I returned a Merrill 16MP compact a few months ago because the answer to that was about 40 minutes. By the time I had set up the camera and taken a few test shots, the battery was exhausted. You needed to run it off the mains!!

Since the DP1 Quattro has a new lens we may expect it to be an improvement, although with the DP1 Merrill you could shoot wonderful photos, as Paul Thacker has done on a ranch. I've seen his photos on Sigma's website a while ago, but now I couldn't find them anymore.
The Loupe isn't a bad thing; I had thought of a Hoodloupe already in case of I would buy me a Quattro. But an EVF would certainly make more sense in our days of digital photography. The loupe is somewhat anachronistic especially when used outdoors. An EVF however needs battery power from the camera; maybe that's why Sigma decided against it.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 14, 2014 at 21:38 UTC
On Sigma announces dp1 Quattro article (197 comments in total)

If only Sigma had given their Quattro cameras a hotshoe for an add-on tiltable EVF! The loupe is certainly a helpful device but it's also bulky and not tiltable.

Sigma should redesign the Quattro series and eliminate a bad mistake as soon as possible! Then a Quattro camera with a super wide angle ought to attract new and serious attention to Sigma's unique sensor!

Direct link | Posted on Sep 13, 2014 at 08:14 UTC as 46th comment | 1 reply
On Zeiss introduces 'no distortion' Otus 1.4/85mm article (334 comments in total)

The Otus line lenses are not made for the mass market (as a Bugatti Veyron is either). They are proof of what the lensmaker Zeiss is capable of. Otus lenses make the brandname Zeiss shine.

It's fun to view the MTF lines you can download from the Zeiss' website!

Direct link | Posted on Sep 9, 2014 at 23:45 UTC as 18th comment
On Zeiss launches Loxia full frame lenses for Sony E-mount article (268 comments in total)
In reply to:

Cal22: The solid build and wonderful look are certainly promising especially to photographers who are longing for responsive prime lenses.

As to whining about the price tag: Take into account that Loxia lenses represent high (maybe highest) standard in lens making. Manual focus isn't a shortage, but - in terms of build - an even bigger challenge. Moreover, when it came to pricing maybe nostalgia ("good old MF-times") has come into play - and, of course, the brandname Zeiss.

In case camera and MF-lens work well together and are capable of top IQ the price tag might be justified to some.

white shadow: I researched the internet now and learned that the classical optical design has been improved over the years keeping the performance up to date. The 50mm/f2 is a "razor sharp lens" that comes close to leading Leica lenses 50mm (pcmag.com).

So, the prices being asked might be justified, some might even say it's a bargain.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 5, 2014 at 17:03 UTC
On Zeiss launches Loxia full frame lenses for Sony E-mount article (268 comments in total)

The solid build and wonderful look are certainly promising especially to photographers who are longing for responsive prime lenses.

As to whining about the price tag: Take into account that Loxia lenses represent high (maybe highest) standard in lens making. Manual focus isn't a shortage, but - in terms of build - an even bigger challenge. Moreover, when it came to pricing maybe nostalgia ("good old MF-times") has come into play - and, of course, the brandname Zeiss.

In case camera and MF-lens work well together and are capable of top IQ the price tag might be justified to some.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 5, 2014 at 02:08 UTC as 8th comment | 3 replies
On Olympus PEN E-PL7 First Impressions Review preview (420 comments in total)

If I'd go for an MFT camera I'd go for Olympus and I'd likely prefer the PL7 over the M10. Both of them are compact and capable of providing good IQ because of a comparatively big sensor. The M10 moreover has a built-in VF which is certainly welcomed by many a photographer. And yet - if you really like picture composing with a VF, you want the PL7 with the additional VF! The VF-4 is said to be great, and attached to the PL7 it's most likely a comfortable way to shoot with a compact. (Not only the left-eyers don't like pressing the face onto the rear screen of the M10 all the time)

Since the PL7 is more than a restyled PL5, it seems to be a package that's worth its price.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 2, 2014 at 02:50 UTC as 17th comment | 3 replies
On Canon India teases 'something big' coming soon article (150 comments in total)

Yes, it looks like a new (tele-) lens is on the horizon.

But what about a call for photographers to participate in a photokina project?

Direct link | Posted on Jul 31, 2014 at 22:18 UTC as 44th comment
On ISO5600_DSC_0628 photo in dpreview review samples's photo gallery (1 comment in total)

Two little explorers in the woods ...

... and a photographer with a message: Why still carrying a bulky DSLR when you're with your family? Take a Nikon 1 V3!

Direct link | Posted on Jul 8, 2014 at 06:07 UTC as 1st comment
In reply to:

Cal22: Leutenegger mentions "Turner" (amongst others) as someone who inspired her. Does she speak of the painter William Turner or the photographer Pete Turner? In any case both of them might inspire with their distinctive approach to colors. However is there any impact of "Turner" in Leutenegger's photos? May I use this opportunity and point especially to Turner's water colors to all of you who rejoice in color composings? (You can find a lot of them in the internet. And Pete Turner might be interesting because of his striking usage of color film)

As to Leuteneggers photos: Maybe her book can transport her works better than this website can do. You could also think that one day people will be celebrating her photos as great evidence of a world long ago as has happened here quite recently with "1939: England in Color".

straleno: You might be right inasmuch as a lot of digital data will likely be lost (maybe mainly for technical reasons: corrupted hard-drives, new digital formats ..). But even if more than 95% of the vast amount of data should have disappeared in let's say 50 vears, there will still be a mass of data and by far more than any epoch in the predigital past has provided.

Something else should be worrying us more, in my view: Remember "The Name Of The Rose"? It's more than just a crime film (or novel) playing in a time long ago. The author tells us of those in power (the Church) and their dealing with knowledge: They use it as a means to control the thinking of people by preserving and supplying knowledge or holding it back. The modern world is full of digital data, and those in power are keen on them. They want to storage, use, misuse or even falsify them. Controlling the data is controlling the world. We have to stop the trend, lest digital data will prove a bane to all of us.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 25, 2014 at 05:34 UTC

OK, Dennis Hopper photographed before he became a famous figure in the movie world. Do the images tell anything more than that?

Direct link | Posted on Jun 25, 2014 at 00:08 UTC as 12th comment
In reply to:

Cal22: Leutenegger mentions "Turner" (amongst others) as someone who inspired her. Does she speak of the painter William Turner or the photographer Pete Turner? In any case both of them might inspire with their distinctive approach to colors. However is there any impact of "Turner" in Leutenegger's photos? May I use this opportunity and point especially to Turner's water colors to all of you who rejoice in color composings? (You can find a lot of them in the internet. And Pete Turner might be interesting because of his striking usage of color film)

As to Leuteneggers photos: Maybe her book can transport her works better than this website can do. You could also think that one day people will be celebrating her photos as great evidence of a world long ago as has happened here quite recently with "1939: England in Color".

Marty: I agree with you! One day historians will face a flood of images that began in our time. This flood has an impact on our perception of photos. You can say, when images are rare they are more meaningful. It's the same with texts: In former cultures when magical thinking ruled and there was no printing of books and no reproducing of photos, images and texts were very meaningful to the people, had often magical significance and were refering to higher powers. The major religions we know of nowadays are based on old Scriptures, the words of which are given magical significance by the faithful.

In their early days books and photos had still great importance but the more they were reproduced the more they were trivialized. Therefore we can say, the demystification of the world is typical for our time. When we praise old photos for their historical value and because they are relatively rare, it's our attitude that dominates our perception. The quality we see comes out of our mind.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 23, 2014 at 07:19 UTC

Leutenegger mentions "Turner" (amongst others) as someone who inspired her. Does she speak of the painter William Turner or the photographer Pete Turner? In any case both of them might inspire with their distinctive approach to colors. However is there any impact of "Turner" in Leutenegger's photos? May I use this opportunity and point especially to Turner's water colors to all of you who rejoice in color composings? (You can find a lot of them in the internet. And Pete Turner might be interesting because of his striking usage of color film)

As to Leuteneggers photos: Maybe her book can transport her works better than this website can do. You could also think that one day people will be celebrating her photos as great evidence of a world long ago as has happened here quite recently with "1939: England in Color".

Direct link | Posted on Jun 22, 2014 at 19:41 UTC as 16th comment | 7 replies
In reply to:

Clyde Thomas: Contax and Rollie both produced exotic vacuum back cameras to keep the film perfectly flat. Precision German engineering made a really big deal about that back when.

Is Sony throwing us a curve or shooting straight here?

Clyde Thomas:
Contax cameras were developed and produced by Yashica, Japan (and not by German engineers).

mikiev:
Yes, film needed to be flat, but the 35mm film was small and stiff and only when having been loaded in a camera and then not used for quite a while, the first shot or two shots - with a 1,4 lens wide open - might have produced slightly decreased sharpness. No problem, really! Unlike the comparative large film sheets in large format cameras: In order to absorb insufficient flatness the photographer had to stop down to f/22, at least. Here a vacuum film back could have made sense, which was a bulky and cumbersome installation, thought for studio works.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 18, 2014 at 05:54 UTC
On 1939: England in Color (part 3) article (90 comments in total)

Very British, indeed!

Well done, Barney!

Direct link | Posted on Jun 8, 2014 at 14:07 UTC as 48th comment
On DSC00184_ISO125 photo in dpreview review samples's photo gallery (3 comments in total)

What a surprise: Bauhaus in Seattle now? ;-)

You know that Bauhaus was a famous center for arts (architecture, design..) and crafts in Germany? One of its directors was Mies van der Rohe, who emigrated to the States where he became celebrated for designing scyscrapers.

Direct link | Posted on May 31, 2014 at 23:35 UTC as 2nd comment | 1 reply
On DSC00205_ISO10000 photo in dpreview review samples's photo gallery (1 comment in total)

ISO 10 000? WOW!

Direct link | Posted on May 31, 2014 at 22:55 UTC as 1st comment
On DSC00020_ISO125 photo in dpreview review samples's photo gallery (2 comments in total)

The shutter speed here is 1/3 sec. - and the camera was handheld as always?

Direct link | Posted on May 31, 2014 at 22:23 UTC as 1st comment | 1 reply
On onOne Software's Perfect Effects 8 available for free article (117 comments in total)
In reply to:

Cal22: Looks nice, but when it comes to downloading they say:

"Requires 8GB of RAM and a 64-bit operating system. Windows 7 or higher.."

What a pity!

@Joe Mayer, Shakens, Sir Corey of Deane

Thanks a lot, but your advice can't help me out of my problems, because I still use Vista 32-bit.

As to "Perfect Effects 8": I'm not complaining about this software or that it isn't achievable for me. I'm just surprised indeed, that my equipment has run out of time within 5 years only - and you all know how to keep up with the time. To tell the truth, I'm struggling with todays technology. I feel like a stranger in the world of bits and bytes and pixels. And sometimes I feel like a living fossil from the past. ;-)

Direct link | Posted on May 7, 2014 at 02:20 UTC
On onOne Software's Perfect Effects 8 available for free article (117 comments in total)
In reply to:

Cal22: Looks nice, but when it comes to downloading they say:

"Requires 8GB of RAM and a 64-bit operating system. Windows 7 or higher.."

What a pity!

Seems like I'm below "the bare minimum".

I can't understand why folks owning pretty good tech stuff (computer, mobile phone, camera etc.) are needy, when it comes to software.

Direct link | Posted on May 6, 2014 at 07:02 UTC
On onOne Software's Perfect Effects 8 available for free article (117 comments in total)

Looks nice, but when it comes to downloading they say:

"Requires 8GB of RAM and a 64-bit operating system. Windows 7 or higher.."

What a pity!

Direct link | Posted on May 6, 2014 at 06:17 UTC as 22nd comment | 6 replies
Total: 107, showing: 1 – 20
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