Cal22

Cal22

Joined on Aug 18, 2012

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Total: 100, showing: 1 – 20
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On ISO5600_DSC_0628 photo in dpreview review samples's photo gallery (1 comment in total)

Two little explorers in the woods ...

... and a photographer with a message: Why still carrying a bulky DSLR when you're with your family? Take a Nikon 1 V3!

Direct link | Posted on Jul 8, 2014 at 06:07 UTC as 1st comment
In reply to:

Cal22: Leutenegger mentions "Turner" (amongst others) as someone who inspired her. Does she speak of the painter William Turner or the photographer Pete Turner? In any case both of them might inspire with their distinctive approach to colors. However is there any impact of "Turner" in Leutenegger's photos? May I use this opportunity and point especially to Turner's water colors to all of you who rejoice in color composings? (You can find a lot of them in the internet. And Pete Turner might be interesting because of his striking usage of color film)

As to Leuteneggers photos: Maybe her book can transport her works better than this website can do. You could also think that one day people will be celebrating her photos as great evidence of a world long ago as has happened here quite recently with "1939: England in Color".

straleno: You might be right inasmuch as a lot of digital data will likely be lost (maybe mainly for technical reasons: corrupted hard-drives, new digital formats ..). But even if more than 95% of the vast amount of data should have disappeared in let's say 50 vears, there will still be a mass of data and by far more than any epoch in the predigital past has provided.

Something else should be worrying us more, in my view: Remember "The Name Of The Rose"? It's more than just a crime film (or novel) playing in a time long ago. The author tells us of those in power (the Church) and their dealing with knowledge: They use it as a means to control the thinking of people by preserving and supplying knowledge or holding it back. The modern world is full of digital data, and those in power are keen on them. They want to storage, use, misuse or even falsify them. Controlling the data is controlling the world. We have to stop the trend, lest digital data will prove a bane to all of us.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 25, 2014 at 05:34 UTC

OK, Dennis Hopper photographed before he became a famous figure in the movie world. Do the images tell anything more than that?

Direct link | Posted on Jun 25, 2014 at 00:08 UTC as 12th comment
In reply to:

Cal22: Leutenegger mentions "Turner" (amongst others) as someone who inspired her. Does she speak of the painter William Turner or the photographer Pete Turner? In any case both of them might inspire with their distinctive approach to colors. However is there any impact of "Turner" in Leutenegger's photos? May I use this opportunity and point especially to Turner's water colors to all of you who rejoice in color composings? (You can find a lot of them in the internet. And Pete Turner might be interesting because of his striking usage of color film)

As to Leuteneggers photos: Maybe her book can transport her works better than this website can do. You could also think that one day people will be celebrating her photos as great evidence of a world long ago as has happened here quite recently with "1939: England in Color".

Marty: I agree with you! One day historians will face a flood of images that began in our time. This flood has an impact on our perception of photos. You can say, when images are rare they are more meaningful. It's the same with texts: In former cultures when magical thinking ruled and there was no printing of books and no reproducing of photos, images and texts were very meaningful to the people, had often magical significance and were refering to higher powers. The major religions we know of nowadays are based on old Scriptures, the words of which are given magical significance by the faithful.

In their early days books and photos had still great importance but the more they were reproduced the more they were trivialized. Therefore we can say, the demystification of the world is typical for our time. When we praise old photos for their historical value and because they are relatively rare, it's our attitude that dominates our perception. The quality we see comes out of our mind.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 23, 2014 at 07:19 UTC

Leutenegger mentions "Turner" (amongst others) as someone who inspired her. Does she speak of the painter William Turner or the photographer Pete Turner? In any case both of them might inspire with their distinctive approach to colors. However is there any impact of "Turner" in Leutenegger's photos? May I use this opportunity and point especially to Turner's water colors to all of you who rejoice in color composings? (You can find a lot of them in the internet. And Pete Turner might be interesting because of his striking usage of color film)

As to Leuteneggers photos: Maybe her book can transport her works better than this website can do. You could also think that one day people will be celebrating her photos as great evidence of a world long ago as has happened here quite recently with "1939: England in Color".

Direct link | Posted on Jun 22, 2014 at 19:41 UTC as 16th comment | 7 replies
In reply to:

Clyde Thomas: Contax and Rollie both produced exotic vacuum back cameras to keep the film perfectly flat. Precision German engineering made a really big deal about that back when.

Is Sony throwing us a curve or shooting straight here?

Clyde Thomas:
Contax cameras were developed and produced by Yashica, Japan (and not by German engineers).

mikiev:
Yes, film needed to be flat, but the 35mm film was small and stiff and only when having been loaded in a camera and then not used for quite a while, the first shot or two shots - with a 1,4 lens wide open - might have produced slightly decreased sharpness. No problem, really! Unlike the comparative large film sheets in large format cameras: In order to absorb insufficient flatness the photographer had to stop down to f/22, at least. Here a vacuum film back could have made sense, which was a bulky and cumbersome installation, thought for studio works.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 18, 2014 at 05:54 UTC
On 1939: England in Color (part 3) article (90 comments in total)

Very British, indeed!

Well done, Barney!

Direct link | Posted on Jun 8, 2014 at 14:07 UTC as 48th comment
On DSC00184_ISO125 photo in dpreview review samples's photo gallery (3 comments in total)

What a surprise: Bauhaus in Seattle now? ;-)

You know that Bauhaus was a famous center for arts (architecture, design..) and crafts in Germany? One of its directors was Mies van der Rohe, who emigrated to the States where he became celebrated for designing scyscrapers.

Direct link | Posted on May 31, 2014 at 23:35 UTC as 2nd comment | 1 reply
On DSC00205_ISO10000 photo in dpreview review samples's photo gallery (1 comment in total)

ISO 10 000? WOW!

Direct link | Posted on May 31, 2014 at 22:55 UTC as 1st comment
On DSC00020_ISO125 photo in dpreview review samples's photo gallery (2 comments in total)

The shutter speed here is 1/3 sec. - and the camera was handheld as always?

Direct link | Posted on May 31, 2014 at 22:23 UTC as 1st comment | 1 reply
On onOne Software's Perfect Effects 8 available for free article (117 comments in total)
In reply to:

Cal22: Looks nice, but when it comes to downloading they say:

"Requires 8GB of RAM and a 64-bit operating system. Windows 7 or higher.."

What a pity!

@Joe Mayer, Shakens, Sir Corey of Deane

Thanks a lot, but your advice can't help me out of my problems, because I still use Vista 32-bit.

As to "Perfect Effects 8": I'm not complaining about this software or that it isn't achievable for me. I'm just surprised indeed, that my equipment has run out of time within 5 years only - and you all know how to keep up with the time. To tell the truth, I'm struggling with todays technology. I feel like a stranger in the world of bits and bytes and pixels. And sometimes I feel like a living fossil from the past. ;-)

Direct link | Posted on May 7, 2014 at 02:20 UTC
On onOne Software's Perfect Effects 8 available for free article (117 comments in total)
In reply to:

Cal22: Looks nice, but when it comes to downloading they say:

"Requires 8GB of RAM and a 64-bit operating system. Windows 7 or higher.."

What a pity!

Seems like I'm below "the bare minimum".

I can't understand why folks owning pretty good tech stuff (computer, mobile phone, camera etc.) are needy, when it comes to software.

Direct link | Posted on May 6, 2014 at 07:02 UTC
On onOne Software's Perfect Effects 8 available for free article (117 comments in total)

Looks nice, but when it comes to downloading they say:

"Requires 8GB of RAM and a 64-bit operating system. Windows 7 or higher.."

What a pity!

Direct link | Posted on May 6, 2014 at 06:17 UTC as 22nd comment | 6 replies
On 1939: England in Color (part 2) article (170 comments in total)

These pictures stand for a time and a world gone by as well as for an ambitious and skilled amateur photographer.

Thanks, Barney for restoring the old slices and bringing them into our modern world of digital photography!

Direct link | Posted on May 3, 2014 at 16:21 UTC as 98th comment
On 1939: England in Color (part 1) article (219 comments in total)

Since I'm not an Engishman (and have never been in the UK) I can't give you any hint as to which locations your grandparents might have steered their car to, 75 years ago. Nevertheless my interest was awakened and so I had an intense look at these photos, the finding of them must have made you glad and presumably strengthens your bonds with family and home country.

Since this is a website for photographing people:
Why naming these photos "fabulous" or "fantastic" or "wonderful"? Because of their stunning composings? No, it's just nice pictures, made by an amateur photographer (admittedly with photographic skills rare in those days). What makes these photos fascinating in our view - is nothing else than our view! It's our attitude, our approach, it's how we look at them and realize these pictures are giving us a glimpse into peoples life. Meanwhile the people have passed away and so we will! It's our inner world that gets animated by such photos.

I'm looking forward to Part II!

Direct link | Posted on Apr 27, 2014 at 04:41 UTC as 66th comment
On Leica T (Typ 701) First Impressions Review preview (1979 comments in total)

The Leica T is the first Leica camera I'm really interested in! The design - albeit not totally new - has been brought to the peak and the samples in the gallery - albeit all JPEG and made with a kit zoom - demonstrate top image quality. If I only had the money ...!

Direct link | Posted on Apr 25, 2014 at 15:27 UTC as 360th comment | 2 replies
On Kodak reborn: A look at JK Imaging's 2014 lineup article (195 comments in total)
In reply to:

Cal22: The Pixpro S-1 is for the 4/3-system, they say, and that's an information on sensor size. We may assume, that the camera has the same lens mount Olympus and Panasonic use - but may we be certain?

Thanks for the response, folks!

I was just wondering about the Kodak line's full integration in the 4/3-system, which is impressively growing on and on.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 26, 2014 at 09:32 UTC
On DSCF1448 photo in dpreview review samples's photo gallery (2 comments in total)

Wonderful picture!

Direct link | Posted on Mar 22, 2014 at 14:57 UTC as 1st comment
On Kodak reborn: A look at JK Imaging's 2014 lineup article (195 comments in total)

The Pixpro S-1 is for the 4/3-system, they say, and that's an information on sensor size. We may assume, that the camera has the same lens mount Olympus and Panasonic use - but may we be certain?

Direct link | Posted on Mar 22, 2014 at 01:34 UTC as 55th comment | 4 replies
On Nikon 1 V3: a quick summary article (597 comments in total)
In reply to:

Shamael: at this price they should put a yellow square on the front, it's the least I await form a high standard luxury object for pretenders. (sorry, the red dot is taken)

Canon will launch the upcoming G1X II with about the same price tag. Or remember the Sony RX100 II, optional grip and EVF added - what did you have to pay for it at market launch? Don't forget the V3 is a real system camera with versatility and phenomenal performance in some respect! And generally, small size is anything but a disadvantage!

Furthermore, Nikon DSLR-photographers can buy an adapter and use the V3 as a teleconverter - making their 400mm e.g. a lens with about 1100 mmm! With no loss of maximum aperture! And shoot sports e.g. with 20 fps and AF-tracking!

By the way, not only cameras with the said red dot but also heavy DSLRs can be used by pretenders!

Direct link | Posted on Mar 15, 2014 at 23:46 UTC
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