Cal22

Cal22

Joined on Aug 18, 2012

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Total: 125, showing: 1 – 20
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On Real-world test: Going pro with the Samsung NX1 article (349 comments in total)

Kudos to Samsung! They clearly want pros to defect to their NX system, and with the NX1 and the new 'S' zooms they might succeed. (However, the advantage of mirrorless - less bulky and less heavyweight than SLRs - gets lost a bit with the camera/lens combo in the video) Be aware that Samsung do it all themselves, as to development and production, whether it's sensor and processor or camera and lenses!

I'm hoping, though, for the new sensor/processor in a (stabilized?) NX400, slim and lightweight, and eventually an optional EVF for flexible use in landscapes and travel. As to the lenses: More high quality lenses (especially wide angle primes: 12mm/20mm or 14mm/24mm) and good third party lenses would certainly be appreciated by many customers who aren't content with the current lineup of Samsung lenses to choose from.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 27, 2014 at 17:36 UTC as 68th comment | 1 reply
On panasonic_gm5_ISO-200_P1000026 photo in dpreview review samples's photo gallery (1 comment in total)

He did it again! :-)

BTW, King Ludwig was king of Bavaria.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 9, 2014 at 02:11 UTC as 1st comment

If these shooter's photos here aren't as compelling as you wish they were, don't blame the photographer. He proves the G1X II can be a companion for the photographer on the go. I doubt that all these grumblers here bring better images home. David's photos are OK, in my view.

I'm not saying, that the camera shouldn't be delivering better IQ. But I'm not competent in this respect. Though, the main issue with the G1X II seems to be of a different kind, IMO: A fullframe DSLR doesn't have to look nice, it may even look ugly, because it's presumed to be a tool for the pro; it's about the same as for the smaller DSLR's for amateurs who emulate the pros.

But the market for mirrorless cameras is different, customers here are 'enthusiasts' and more or less narcisstic people (hence the selfie rear-screens!) who won't carry a camera that looks old-fashioned or heavy-handed like the G1X II does.

My advice to Canon: Pay regard not only to improving your cameras but also to the look of them!

Direct link | Posted on Oct 17, 2014 at 06:47 UTC as 34th comment
In reply to:

Cal22: Go to the LX100 First Impressions Review where the lens design is to be seen (compared to the lens of the LX7). You can see there that Panasonic has changed the AA filter on the LX100's sensor: It's quite a bit thicker now!

We know lens design must be matched with the AA filter, otherwise sharpness in photos will be more or less reduced. The samples in the gallery now could make you think that Leica designed the lens not knowing of the AA filter in the LX100 has been changed. It's not really thinkable, is it?

@Thomas Kachadurian:

Panasonic has the production line, as far as I understand, after Leica designed the optical construction.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 7, 2014 at 13:22 UTC
In reply to:

Cal22: Go to the LX100 First Impressions Review where the lens design is to be seen (compared to the lens of the LX7). You can see there that Panasonic has changed the AA filter on the LX100's sensor: It's quite a bit thicker now!

We know lens design must be matched with the AA filter, otherwise sharpness in photos will be more or less reduced. The samples in the gallery now could make you think that Leica designed the lens not knowing of the AA filter in the LX100 has been changed. It's not really thinkable, is it?

@Menneisyys: Maybe massive distortion correction is needed for the small sized zoom and that's causing noise.

On Imaging Resource they compare crops (LX100/RX100 III/L7X) and the LX100 performs clearly better. It's confusing!

Direct link | Posted on Oct 6, 2014 at 23:35 UTC

Go to the LX100 First Impressions Review where the lens design is to be seen (compared to the lens of the LX7). You can see there that Panasonic has changed the AA filter on the LX100's sensor: It's quite a bit thicker now!

We know lens design must be matched with the AA filter, otherwise sharpness in photos will be more or less reduced. The samples in the gallery now could make you think that Leica designed the lens not knowing of the AA filter in the LX100 has been changed. It's not really thinkable, is it?

Direct link | Posted on Oct 6, 2014 at 22:44 UTC as 56th comment | 7 replies

Panasonic LX100 and Sony RX100 III are rivals. Compare the samples in both galleries: Do the Panasonic samples look like having superior IQ?

Direct link | Posted on Oct 6, 2014 at 20:16 UTC as 63rd comment | 3 replies
On 04_ISO200_P9580532 photo in dpreview review samples's photo gallery (8 comments in total)
In reply to:

Menneisyys: A little bit oversharpened, with discernible color noise (blotches) in the asphalt even at ISO200. Which (the latter) is a pity, given that the lens seems to be producing great results.

The leaves high above in the tree, the edges of the building or the lamp post right hand - there's no oversharpening as far as I can see. Maybe even a little more sharpening could be worth a trial.

The pictures in the gallery here seem to be a bit on the warm side, which might be common with compacts nowadays.

The noise you're speaking of is probably due to the built-in automatic distortion correction.

We may expect the Leica lens to be performing well, but should not expect any lens to be capable of exceeding the limitations of MFT!

Direct link | Posted on Oct 6, 2014 at 01:39 UTC
On 08_ISO200_P1000041 photo in dpreview review samples's photo gallery (2 comments in total)

Once again a German name in the gallery? ;)

With the RX100 III it was the "Bauhaus", Richard photographed, and this time it's the "Bären Haus". (Note the humor: It's a Bear House and not a Beer House!)

The LX100 seems to push the warm colors a bit too much; or was it just the warm light of the day?

Direct link | Posted on Oct 4, 2014 at 02:54 UTC as 1st comment | 1 reply
On Inside RA001: World's first Boeing 747 'Jumbo Jet' article (127 comments in total)
In reply to:

Cal22: Informative pictures! Thanks, Barney!

As to your photographic approach: You photographed sans flash? What camera did you use, what lenses? And did the pictures take any amount of post processing to brighten up the shadows?

Compared to the past when photographers had a film in the camera nowadays somewhat challenging light conditions seem to be no problem anymore. I guess many young photographers aren't aware of the benefits of the digital era in photography, because they can't compare.

@Bond: I know of Fujifilm's DR modes, a feature that's likely similar to Sony's Dynamic Range Optimization in their RX100 series. Overall, Fujifilm's JPEGs are praised for their quality.

As to sensor sizes I guess there's no best one in every respect. May it be FF, APS-C, MFT or 1 inch - they all have their pros and cons.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 29, 2014 at 21:13 UTC
On Inside RA001: World's first Boeing 747 'Jumbo Jet' article (127 comments in total)
In reply to:

Cal22: Informative pictures! Thanks, Barney!

As to your photographic approach: You photographed sans flash? What camera did you use, what lenses? And did the pictures take any amount of post processing to brighten up the shadows?

Compared to the past when photographers had a film in the camera nowadays somewhat challenging light conditions seem to be no problem anymore. I guess many young photographers aren't aware of the benefits of the digital era in photography, because they can't compare.

@Barney: Thanks for answering!

That's interesting: You underexposed first and boosted afterwards with fine results! Similar approach with some films was possible but came along with heavy noise.
Remember the Kodachrome 25? This was the sharpest color transparency film on the market, but its dynamic range was poor (not to speak of issues with color cast and rendering). Photographing in plane's interior with K25 would have been a real challenge - with flashlights being indispensable.

You brought 'huge' cameras to the plane providing for high technical quality. And there's nothing to complain about. I wish, though, you'd taken two or three of the interior shots also with APS-C and with 1inch sensors, in this way allowing a comparison of sensor size and performance.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 29, 2014 at 13:55 UTC
On Inside RA001: World's first Boeing 747 'Jumbo Jet' article (127 comments in total)

Informative pictures! Thanks, Barney!

As to your photographic approach: You photographed sans flash? What camera did you use, what lenses? And did the pictures take any amount of post processing to brighten up the shadows?

Compared to the past when photographers had a film in the camera nowadays somewhat challenging light conditions seem to be no problem anymore. I guess many young photographers aren't aware of the benefits of the digital era in photography, because they can't compare.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 28, 2014 at 14:19 UTC as 53rd comment | 4 replies
On Sony shows off upcoming full-frame lenses at Photokina article (328 comments in total)

Not any word about the Loxia line? I'd expect a 25mm or a 21mm to be announced.

You don't need AF in wide angle photography (with primes)!

Direct link | Posted on Sep 25, 2014 at 11:43 UTC as 26th comment | 2 replies
On Hands-on with Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX100 article (435 comments in total)
In reply to:

PLAMBERT: The new GM5 might just be a better camera as it has interchangeable lenses and the size is comparable. The drawback of interchangeable lenses is that you have to carry them with you to use them! The whole outfit would be much heavier than the LX100. I use a compact coupled rangefinder camera with various lenses and the outfit bag is heavy, no zoom lenses included.
Phil

Yes, the more lenses you're carrying around, the more you might wish to have instead an all-in-one package in your hands. That's what the LX100 seems to have been made for.

Quite the same with depth of field: In the film era everybody yearned for sharpness all over the scene (apart from portraying) - even the photographers using large format cameras outdoors. And now as small sensors let us have expanded depth of field, everybody seems to be striving for shallow depth of field.

As to the zoom lens in the LX100 which has a maximum aperture with a ff equivalence of f5.6 in 70mm: You can forget about shallow depth of field in mft. Regard it as an asset or as a drawback. So, a GM5 with the tiny 12-32mm might be a good alternative to the LX100 and you still have the option for interchangeable lenses. The GM5 might fit better in your pocket and the LX100 better in your hands!

Direct link | Posted on Sep 22, 2014 at 12:36 UTC
On Hands-on with Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX100 article (435 comments in total)
In reply to:

Lanski: I don't want to be a ____ about this but it's a little disappointing that as soon as it's a woman holding the camera we start getting comments specifically relating to her hands (at least one has since been deleted). Surely we're better than that?

I like Allison with her female approach to the subject of this website!

Direct link | Posted on Sep 21, 2014 at 03:09 UTC
On Hands-on with Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX100 article (435 comments in total)
In reply to:

sderdiarian: Barney, do you know if it will be available with a silver top of body like the X100T? I think this would sell well.

Yes, there is a silver body version of the LX100. You can see it in the video: "Photokina 2014 interview: The Panasonic Lumix DMC - LX100". The camera looks great IMO, solid and serious (at least as long as the lens isn't protruding).

Direct link | Posted on Sep 21, 2014 at 03:00 UTC
On Hands-on with Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX100 article (435 comments in total)
In reply to:

Cal22: The LX100 aims at people who want an all-in-one solution. And the camera has a lot to like. I like especially the full manual control with control dials on the top plate for your right hand and a ring at the lens' mount for your left. And the camera body is big enough to making it not fiddly.

What I don't like: The camera has no tilting rear screen and no tilting EVF either. How to shoot from ground level? And a bundled flash should come up with more options than a built-in flash can provide; whether Panasonic will deliver in this respect, we may doubt until now.

The lens' zoom range is a little limited. Let's hope the image quality lives up to the name Leica!

As to a tilting EVF/screen: It depends on your kind of shooting. Running around and doing snapshots is not my kind. When photographing landscapes I have often used a tilting VF for composing from low angle (albeit rarely from ground level) or with the camera on my tripod. Looking for the right perspective can be an essential part of photographers doing - not less important than looking for the 'decisive moment'!

Direct link | Posted on Sep 21, 2014 at 02:04 UTC
On Hands-on with Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX100 article (435 comments in total)

The LX100 aims at people who want an all-in-one solution. And the camera has a lot to like. I like especially the full manual control with control dials on the top plate for your right hand and a ring at the lens' mount for your left. And the camera body is big enough to making it not fiddly.

What I don't like: The camera has no tilting rear screen and no tilting EVF either. How to shoot from ground level? And a bundled flash should come up with more options than a built-in flash can provide; whether Panasonic will deliver in this respect, we may doubt until now.

The lens' zoom range is a little limited. Let's hope the image quality lives up to the name Leica!

Direct link | Posted on Sep 20, 2014 at 21:14 UTC as 79th comment | 11 replies
On Sigma announces dp1 Quattro article (202 comments in total)
In reply to:

munro harrap: There will be stillife studio and landscapes types who will love it, but it is impractical for reportage-completely.When do we get the choice of an EVF? The image quality from the DP2 is wonderful, but is the DP1Quattro's lens a vast improvement on the DP1 Merrills, because it was not at all a good lens
I would need to know how many hours I can leave the battery running before it dies.
I returned a Merrill 16MP compact a few months ago because the answer to that was about 40 minutes. By the time I had set up the camera and taken a few test shots, the battery was exhausted. You needed to run it off the mains!!

Since the DP1 Quattro has a new lens we may expect it to be an improvement, although with the DP1 Merrill you could shoot wonderful photos, as Paul Thacker has done on a ranch. I've seen his photos on Sigma's website a while ago, but now I couldn't find them anymore.
The Loupe isn't a bad thing; I had thought of a Hoodloupe already in case of I would buy me a Quattro. But an EVF would certainly make more sense in our days of digital photography. The loupe is somewhat anachronistic especially when used outdoors. An EVF however needs battery power from the camera; maybe that's why Sigma decided against it.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 14, 2014 at 21:38 UTC
On Sigma announces dp1 Quattro article (202 comments in total)

If only Sigma had given their Quattro cameras a hotshoe for an add-on tiltable EVF! The loupe is certainly a helpful device but it's also bulky and not tiltable.

Sigma should redesign the Quattro series and eliminate a bad mistake as soon as possible! Then a Quattro camera with a super wide angle ought to attract new and serious attention to Sigma's unique sensor!

Direct link | Posted on Sep 13, 2014 at 08:14 UTC as 47th comment | 1 reply
Total: 125, showing: 1 – 20
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