Cal22

Cal22

Joined on Aug 18, 2012

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Total: 131, showing: 1 – 20
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On Hawaii-June 1969 & June 2014 in the Memories challenge (35 comments in total)

Looking at this comparison of pictures and persons you wouldn't think that about 46 years have gone by. Congrats!

Thanks for sharing the personal story behind it!

Direct link | Posted on May 10, 2015 at 04:22 UTC as 14th comment
On Readers' Showcase: Rodger Kingston article (52 comments in total)

Rodger Kingston images in the showcase and the information that he uses an X10 and an X20 made me curious about his book (mentioned at #10). The title "Searching for Edward Hopper" has somewhat of a marketing trick: There's the cover photo that quotes the famous painter, with a number of pictures following that might be seen as Hopper style; other pictures let me think of Walker Evans. Overall, the book contains a mass of pictures which are just good if not great snapshots. By the way, in Part II, #28. Morning Coffee, Belmont, MA 2007, there's a picture of Stephen Shore's "Uncommon Places" on the table, if I'm right!

Well, Rodger, I'm not an expert on selling art, but I guess, there are too many (good) images in just one book. Maybe you had better done with a book containing not more than about 35 pictures and an additional print; later on a second package of that kind (and a third one?). Nevertheless, your photos stand for a capable photographer!

Direct link | Posted on Apr 24, 2015 at 04:29 UTC as 5th comment
In reply to:

Cal22: The high resolution mode of the OM-D E-M5 II is really fantastic as everybody realizes who checks the studio test scene out (in comparison with ff cameras). The caveat with this mode is, you have to use a sturdy tripod and your object may not move otherwise it gets blurred.

Well, I remember an Olympus representative saying (here on Dpreview), their engineers want to build a 4/3 camera that allows to shoot in high resolution mode at 1/80th sec (which means handheld). The technical problem and its solution has certainly to do with sensor size. Since Olympus and Sony go together in some respect I could imagine Sony to launch a 1inch RX with high resolution mode at 1/125th sec.; the IQ would be equal to an APS-C sensor. Let's hope for such a capable compact at the next Photokina!

No, I haven't!

I suggest taking the studio test scene (in full screen mode) within e.g. the Samsung NX1 review. Compare the IQ of the NX1 and of E-M5 II (in High Res. mode) and of Sony A7 II or A7 R.

Concentrate on the playing cards in the upper part of the studio scene and therein on the middle card (jack of hearts). I'm sure that will convince you! You can also change from High Res. mode to Normal in order to see how huge the difference is.

Are we at the eve of a revolution? A Sony RX 100 model will likely be the first camera providing that great IQ handheld - with Olympus 4/3 cameras following. Soon photographers won't carry a bulky DSLR around anymore unless they have to.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 21, 2015 at 01:05 UTC

The high resolution mode of the OM-D E-M5 II is really fantastic as everybody realizes who checks the studio test scene out (in comparison with ff cameras). The caveat with this mode is, you have to use a sturdy tripod and your object may not move otherwise it gets blurred.

Well, I remember an Olympus representative saying (here on Dpreview), their engineers want to build a 4/3 camera that allows to shoot in high resolution mode at 1/80th sec (which means handheld). The technical problem and its solution has certainly to do with sensor size. Since Olympus and Sony go together in some respect I could imagine Sony to launch a 1inch RX with high resolution mode at 1/125th sec.; the IQ would be equal to an APS-C sensor. Let's hope for such a capable compact at the next Photokina!

Direct link | Posted on Apr 19, 2015 at 04:49 UTC as 11th comment | 2 replies
On Samsung introduces NX500 with NX1's 28MP BSI sensor article (143 comments in total)
In reply to:

Cal22: Samsung should offer an EVF as an accessory: Many potential customers will turn their back to this interesting camera because you can't buy an EVF!

You're right as to the NX100! But nowadays EVFs are way better than they were in 2010, and if Samsung want to be regarded as a serious camera maker they'd better not ignore the various demands of serious photographers. The NX1 might be a good camera, but its SLR-style is not for everybody. I had hoped for a capable alternative, the NX500 unfortunately can't be because of its lack of an EVF.

Generally I'd prefer an external EVF over a built-in one because the latter is a bit uncomfortable for a lefteyer who I am. And since I like composing with my eye at the vf, I'd rather buy me an Olympus PEN (with VF-4) than an OMD.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 7, 2015 at 20:40 UTC
On Samsung introduces NX500 with NX1's 28MP BSI sensor article (143 comments in total)

Samsung should offer an EVF as an accessory: Many potential customers will turn their back to this interesting camera because you can't buy an EVF!

Direct link | Posted on Feb 7, 2015 at 13:26 UTC as 6th comment | 5 replies
On Real-world test: Going pro with the Samsung NX1 article (369 comments in total)

Kudos to Samsung! They clearly want pros to defect to their NX system, and with the NX1 and the new 'S' zooms they might succeed. (However, the advantage of mirrorless - less bulky and less heavyweight than SLRs - gets lost a bit with the camera/lens combo in the video) Be aware that Samsung do it all themselves, as to development and production, whether it's sensor and processor or camera and lenses!

I'm hoping, though, for the new sensor/processor in a (stabilized?) NX400, slim and lightweight, and eventually an optional EVF for flexible use in landscapes and travel. As to the lenses: More high quality lenses (especially wide angle primes: 12mm/20mm or 14mm/24mm) and good third party lenses would certainly be appreciated by many customers who aren't content with the current lineup of Samsung lenses to choose from.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 27, 2014 at 17:36 UTC as 77th comment | 1 reply
On panasonic_gm5_ISO-200_P1000026 photo in dpreview review samples's photo gallery (1 comment in total)

He did it again! :-)

BTW, King Ludwig was king of Bavaria.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 9, 2014 at 02:11 UTC as 1st comment

If these shooter's photos here aren't as compelling as you wish they were, don't blame the photographer. He proves the G1X II can be a companion for the photographer on the go. I doubt that all these grumblers here bring better images home. David's photos are OK, in my view.

I'm not saying, that the camera shouldn't be delivering better IQ. But I'm not competent in this respect. Though, the main issue with the G1X II seems to be of a different kind, IMO: A fullframe DSLR doesn't have to look nice, it may even look ugly, because it's presumed to be a tool for the pro; it's about the same as for the smaller DSLR's for amateurs who emulate the pros.

But the market for mirrorless cameras is different, customers here are 'enthusiasts' and more or less narcisstic people (hence the selfie rear-screens!) who won't carry a camera that looks old-fashioned or heavy-handed like the G1X II does.

My advice to Canon: Pay regard not only to improving your cameras but also to the look of them!

Direct link | Posted on Oct 17, 2014 at 06:47 UTC as 36th comment
In reply to:

Cal22: Go to the LX100 First Impressions Review where the lens design is to be seen (compared to the lens of the LX7). You can see there that Panasonic has changed the AA filter on the LX100's sensor: It's quite a bit thicker now!

We know lens design must be matched with the AA filter, otherwise sharpness in photos will be more or less reduced. The samples in the gallery now could make you think that Leica designed the lens not knowing of the AA filter in the LX100 has been changed. It's not really thinkable, is it?

@Thomas Kachadurian:

Panasonic has the production line, as far as I understand, after Leica designed the optical construction.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 7, 2014 at 13:22 UTC
In reply to:

Cal22: Go to the LX100 First Impressions Review where the lens design is to be seen (compared to the lens of the LX7). You can see there that Panasonic has changed the AA filter on the LX100's sensor: It's quite a bit thicker now!

We know lens design must be matched with the AA filter, otherwise sharpness in photos will be more or less reduced. The samples in the gallery now could make you think that Leica designed the lens not knowing of the AA filter in the LX100 has been changed. It's not really thinkable, is it?

@Menneisyys: Maybe massive distortion correction is needed for the small sized zoom and that's causing noise.

On Imaging Resource they compare crops (LX100/RX100 III/L7X) and the LX100 performs clearly better. It's confusing!

Direct link | Posted on Oct 6, 2014 at 23:35 UTC

Go to the LX100 First Impressions Review where the lens design is to be seen (compared to the lens of the LX7). You can see there that Panasonic has changed the AA filter on the LX100's sensor: It's quite a bit thicker now!

We know lens design must be matched with the AA filter, otherwise sharpness in photos will be more or less reduced. The samples in the gallery now could make you think that Leica designed the lens not knowing of the AA filter in the LX100 has been changed. It's not really thinkable, is it?

Direct link | Posted on Oct 6, 2014 at 22:44 UTC as 58th comment | 7 replies

Panasonic LX100 and Sony RX100 III are rivals. Compare the samples in both galleries: Do the Panasonic samples look like having superior IQ?

Direct link | Posted on Oct 6, 2014 at 20:16 UTC as 65th comment | 3 replies
On 04_ISO200_P9580532 photo in dpreview review samples's photo gallery (8 comments in total)
In reply to:

Menneisyys: A little bit oversharpened, with discernible color noise (blotches) in the asphalt even at ISO200. Which (the latter) is a pity, given that the lens seems to be producing great results.

The leaves high above in the tree, the edges of the building or the lamp post right hand - there's no oversharpening as far as I can see. Maybe even a little more sharpening could be worth a trial.

The pictures in the gallery here seem to be a bit on the warm side, which might be common with compacts nowadays.

The noise you're speaking of is probably due to the built-in automatic distortion correction.

We may expect the Leica lens to be performing well, but should not expect any lens to be capable of exceeding the limitations of MFT!

Direct link | Posted on Oct 6, 2014 at 01:39 UTC
On 08_ISO200_P1000041 photo in dpreview review samples's photo gallery (2 comments in total)

Once again a German name in the gallery? ;)

With the RX100 III it was the "Bauhaus", Richard photographed, and this time it's the "Bären Haus". (Note the humor: It's a Bear House and not a Beer House!)

The LX100 seems to push the warm colors a bit too much; or was it just the warm light of the day?

Direct link | Posted on Oct 4, 2014 at 02:54 UTC as 1st comment | 1 reply
On Inside RA001: World's first Boeing 747 'Jumbo Jet' article (127 comments in total)
In reply to:

Cal22: Informative pictures! Thanks, Barney!

As to your photographic approach: You photographed sans flash? What camera did you use, what lenses? And did the pictures take any amount of post processing to brighten up the shadows?

Compared to the past when photographers had a film in the camera nowadays somewhat challenging light conditions seem to be no problem anymore. I guess many young photographers aren't aware of the benefits of the digital era in photography, because they can't compare.

@Bond: I know of Fujifilm's DR modes, a feature that's likely similar to Sony's Dynamic Range Optimization in their RX100 series. Overall, Fujifilm's JPEGs are praised for their quality.

As to sensor sizes I guess there's no best one in every respect. May it be FF, APS-C, MFT or 1 inch - they all have their pros and cons.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 29, 2014 at 21:13 UTC
On Inside RA001: World's first Boeing 747 'Jumbo Jet' article (127 comments in total)
In reply to:

Cal22: Informative pictures! Thanks, Barney!

As to your photographic approach: You photographed sans flash? What camera did you use, what lenses? And did the pictures take any amount of post processing to brighten up the shadows?

Compared to the past when photographers had a film in the camera nowadays somewhat challenging light conditions seem to be no problem anymore. I guess many young photographers aren't aware of the benefits of the digital era in photography, because they can't compare.

@Barney: Thanks for answering!

That's interesting: You underexposed first and boosted afterwards with fine results! Similar approach with some films was possible but came along with heavy noise.
Remember the Kodachrome 25? This was the sharpest color transparency film on the market, but its dynamic range was poor (not to speak of issues with color cast and rendering). Photographing in plane's interior with K25 would have been a real challenge - with flashlights being indispensable.

You brought 'huge' cameras to the plane providing for high technical quality. And there's nothing to complain about. I wish, though, you'd taken two or three of the interior shots also with APS-C and with 1inch sensors, in this way allowing a comparison of sensor size and performance.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 29, 2014 at 13:55 UTC
On Inside RA001: World's first Boeing 747 'Jumbo Jet' article (127 comments in total)

Informative pictures! Thanks, Barney!

As to your photographic approach: You photographed sans flash? What camera did you use, what lenses? And did the pictures take any amount of post processing to brighten up the shadows?

Compared to the past when photographers had a film in the camera nowadays somewhat challenging light conditions seem to be no problem anymore. I guess many young photographers aren't aware of the benefits of the digital era in photography, because they can't compare.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 28, 2014 at 14:19 UTC as 53rd comment | 4 replies
On Sony shows off upcoming full-frame lenses at Photokina article (337 comments in total)

Not any word about the Loxia line? I'd expect a 25mm or a 21mm to be announced.

You don't need AF in wide angle photography (with primes)!

Direct link | Posted on Sep 25, 2014 at 11:43 UTC as 35th comment | 2 replies
On Hands-on with Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX100 article (441 comments in total)
In reply to:

PLAMBERT: The new GM5 might just be a better camera as it has interchangeable lenses and the size is comparable. The drawback of interchangeable lenses is that you have to carry them with you to use them! The whole outfit would be much heavier than the LX100. I use a compact coupled rangefinder camera with various lenses and the outfit bag is heavy, no zoom lenses included.
Phil

Yes, the more lenses you're carrying around, the more you might wish to have instead an all-in-one package in your hands. That's what the LX100 seems to have been made for.

Quite the same with depth of field: In the film era everybody yearned for sharpness all over the scene (apart from portraying) - even the photographers using large format cameras outdoors. And now as small sensors let us have expanded depth of field, everybody seems to be striving for shallow depth of field.

As to the zoom lens in the LX100 which has a maximum aperture with a ff equivalence of f5.6 in 70mm: You can forget about shallow depth of field in mft. Regard it as an asset or as a drawback. So, a GM5 with the tiny 12-32mm might be a good alternative to the LX100 and you still have the option for interchangeable lenses. The GM5 might fit better in your pocket and the LX100 better in your hands!

Direct link | Posted on Sep 22, 2014 at 12:36 UTC
Total: 131, showing: 1 – 20
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