ecka84

ecka84

Lives in Lithuania Lithuania
Joined on Sep 18, 2009

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Total: 73, showing: 21 – 40
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On Canon PowerShot G1 X Mark II: a quick summary article (535 comments in total)

It looks like a very nice camera. Although, why making a big protruding lens barrel and a tiny little grip with a small battery in it? LP-E6 would have been glorious.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 12, 2014 at 07:53 UTC as 141st comment
In reply to:

Tapper123: Price is absurd.

Look at the Fuji equivalent. Hope this bombs hard in the market.

70-200/2.8non-IS was made in the 20th century :). It is cheaper, because it is old and inferior by all parameters. IS and non-IS are not two different lens lineups. They just started putting IS in all 70-200mm (including F4) in 21st century.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 12, 2014 at 17:20 UTC
In reply to:

Frank_BR: I have no doubt that the Nocticron is a spectacular lens. However, a lens with a price tag of $1700 certainly is not a product for the masses.

With the Nocticron, Panasonic's intention is to draw attention and bring prestigie to the m43 format, especially among the professionals.

Panasonic's strategy to increase the appeal of the m43 system is almost complete. The m43 system already has fast primes and zooms, macro, ultra wide angle and fisheye lenses. What is missing now are basically the fast telephoto lenses like the 150mm F/2.8.

That said, it must be recognized that Panasonic is charging too much for the Nocticron. Consider, for example, the zoom Tamron SP 150-600mm F/5-6.3 Di VC USD, which has a more complex optical design that uses 4 or 5 times more material (optical glasses, metals, etc.), but Tamron can sell it for about $1000. From this comparison, it is clear that Panasonic could charge a little over $500 for the Nocticron, and still make a profit.

Evening Naveed :). The picture is more important for me. I guess I could live with whatever design, if it delivers the oomph :). The Nocticron may be the oomph-factory for m4/3 system, I'm not denying that, but Jeez.. it's expensive. It's like a sports-car - all the cheap ones are crap or too specializes and the good ones are too expensive :).

Direct link | Posted on Jan 10, 2014 at 19:23 UTC
In reply to:

Joachim Gerstl: Not interested. I have a m43 camera now for size. This lens is big and heavy and still slow when compared to FF.
It's prize is rather optimistic too.

@klopus How come 500mm f/4 isn't slow? :)

Direct link | Posted on Jan 10, 2014 at 16:48 UTC
On Sigma announces all-new 50mm F1.4 DG HSM 'Art' lens article (245 comments in total)
In reply to:

Zoron: where's the OS ?....its 2014 and FF market going down....now or never man

Are there any non-film 35mm formats?

Direct link | Posted on Jan 10, 2014 at 00:44 UTC
In reply to:

Frank_BR: I have no doubt that the Nocticron is a spectacular lens. However, a lens with a price tag of $1700 certainly is not a product for the masses.

With the Nocticron, Panasonic's intention is to draw attention and bring prestigie to the m43 format, especially among the professionals.

Panasonic's strategy to increase the appeal of the m43 system is almost complete. The m43 system already has fast primes and zooms, macro, ultra wide angle and fisheye lenses. What is missing now are basically the fast telephoto lenses like the 150mm F/2.8.

That said, it must be recognized that Panasonic is charging too much for the Nocticron. Consider, for example, the zoom Tamron SP 150-600mm F/5-6.3 Di VC USD, which has a more complex optical design that uses 4 or 5 times more material (optical glasses, metals, etc.), but Tamron can sell it for about $1000. From this comparison, it is clear that Panasonic could charge a little over $500 for the Nocticron, and still make a profit.

Thank you Naveed. I do like my 6D, for now :), despite that it has some flaws (like any other camera). Pana and Oly learned to make nicely designed mirrorless bodies. However, I mostly prefer the ones with better grip and ergonomics. like GH# series and the new E-M1 (much better than E-M5). Not sure about the Sony A7, it's design is kind of blunt :) (I should mention that it has 4 native lenses released already, not one - 28-70, 24-70/4, 35/2.8 and 55/1.8). I spent more time handling the m4/3 RAW files than the actual bodies. E-M1's EVF is spectacular, but ... while my judgment may be spoiled by the FF output :) ... I expected better IQ for the price. Many of their optical formulas are compromised by the prioritized "pocketability" features, and the better ones are unreasonably expensive. Oh well, let's wait for the A8 (or A7N or A7T :) )

Direct link | Posted on Jan 9, 2014 at 23:57 UTC
On Sigma announces all-new 50mm F1.4 DG HSM 'Art' lens article (245 comments in total)
In reply to:

Zoron: where's the OS ?....its 2014 and FF market going down....now or never man

Do you realize that 35mm format means the 35mm film width (not the frame) for a vintage camera? 35mm as a dimension has nothing to do with a Digital SLR (DSLR) sensor.
However, I kinda agree with you. I think that EVF will dominate the market at some point, and I'd like them to improve that technology.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 9, 2014 at 22:16 UTC
In reply to:

Frank_BR: I have no doubt that the Nocticron is a spectacular lens. However, a lens with a price tag of $1700 certainly is not a product for the masses.

With the Nocticron, Panasonic's intention is to draw attention and bring prestigie to the m43 format, especially among the professionals.

Panasonic's strategy to increase the appeal of the m43 system is almost complete. The m43 system already has fast primes and zooms, macro, ultra wide angle and fisheye lenses. What is missing now are basically the fast telephoto lenses like the 150mm F/2.8.

That said, it must be recognized that Panasonic is charging too much for the Nocticron. Consider, for example, the zoom Tamron SP 150-600mm F/5-6.3 Di VC USD, which has a more complex optical design that uses 4 or 5 times more material (optical glasses, metals, etc.), but Tamron can sell it for about $1000. From this comparison, it is clear that Panasonic could charge a little over $500 for the Nocticron, and still make a profit.

I guess that FF fans are just amazed by such shocking m4/3 pricing :). Nothing more really. That's inevitable when you're starting to realize that it is perfectly possible to fit a FF sensor in a small mirrorless body, mount a slow(ish) lens on it (like f/4 or even f/5.6 pancake) and still get better results than a smaller sensor with relatively huge and expensive optics. I'm glad that you are enjoying your gear, and I wouldn't argue if there wasn't so much misleading information floating around about these "format wars".
Cheers!

P.S. I added my flickr link in my DPR user info, nothing special there though :)

Direct link | Posted on Jan 9, 2014 at 17:46 UTC
On Sigma announces all-new 50mm F1.4 DG HSM 'Art' lens article (245 comments in total)
In reply to:

Zoron: where's the OS ?....its 2014 and FF market going down....now or never man

@yabokkie, what are you talking about? 35mm SLR format died long time ago :)
The digital FF isn't going away anytime soon. Technological progress is making FF sensor manufacturing cheaper and faster. It won't die till there is a better solution. Actually, FF may be the reason for APSC and m4/3 formats sinking into oblivion, which would make a lot more sense.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 9, 2014 at 17:02 UTC
In reply to:

TN Args: Can someone in DPR please remove all posts in this thread that are about so-called 'full-frame' (44mm sensor) equivalencies?

What a monumental waste of space and repetition in 10,000 different locations. Not to mention that fact that it's trolling. You don't see this extent of trolling on 44 mm sensor articles, with people relentlessly pointing out how superior medium format or large format sensors are, and the lens/sensor equivalencies converted to 8x10-inch, and how poorly the 44 mm sensor gathers light by comparison with 8x10, over and over and over and over and.....

Once that is done, delete this post too. And I will thank DPR for their efforts.

DoF only depends on focal length (mm), diaphragm (F) and focus distance. Sensor size is a very important factor when deciding on focus distance while framing the shot (bigger sensor = shorter distance = shallower DoF), otherwise it doesn't effect DoF directly.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 9, 2014 at 14:28 UTC
In reply to:

Frank_BR: I have no doubt that the Nocticron is a spectacular lens. However, a lens with a price tag of $1700 certainly is not a product for the masses.

With the Nocticron, Panasonic's intention is to draw attention and bring prestigie to the m43 format, especially among the professionals.

Panasonic's strategy to increase the appeal of the m43 system is almost complete. The m43 system already has fast primes and zooms, macro, ultra wide angle and fisheye lenses. What is missing now are basically the fast telephoto lenses like the 150mm F/2.8.

That said, it must be recognized that Panasonic is charging too much for the Nocticron. Consider, for example, the zoom Tamron SP 150-600mm F/5-6.3 Di VC USD, which has a more complex optical design that uses 4 or 5 times more material (optical glasses, metals, etc.), but Tamron can sell it for about $1000. From this comparison, it is clear that Panasonic could charge a little over $500 for the Nocticron, and still make a profit.

Hi Naveed. I'm just saying that there is no comparison between FF and m4/3 systems. For me, 2x crop is in a P&S territory. Therefore I think this lens is "slightly" overpriced, for what it is. I'm using primes only. I have no need for "focal range covering" of any kind. Yes I had some expensive f/2.8 zooms before, but not anymore. With FF I can shoot 85mm FoV using 50mm lens, easily (with some cropping involved), and there will still be plenty of pixels left to put m4/3 to shame. The thing is that m4/3 comes pre-cropped and if you need a ridiculously priced lens collection to make it produce something more than snapshots, then maybe it is wiser to get a real camera instead? I understand that most people only need a snapshot and that's OK. Just stop comparing it to the real thing and pretend like there is no difference. The difference is HUGE. Even if you manage to produce same DoF, same framing, same perspective - bigger pixels would still win. That's physics.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 9, 2014 at 11:43 UTC
In reply to:

Frank_BR: I have no doubt that the Nocticron is a spectacular lens. However, a lens with a price tag of $1700 certainly is not a product for the masses.

With the Nocticron, Panasonic's intention is to draw attention and bring prestigie to the m43 format, especially among the professionals.

Panasonic's strategy to increase the appeal of the m43 system is almost complete. The m43 system already has fast primes and zooms, macro, ultra wide angle and fisheye lenses. What is missing now are basically the fast telephoto lenses like the 150mm F/2.8.

That said, it must be recognized that Panasonic is charging too much for the Nocticron. Consider, for example, the zoom Tamron SP 150-600mm F/5-6.3 Di VC USD, which has a more complex optical design that uses 4 or 5 times more material (optical glasses, metals, etc.), but Tamron can sell it for about $1000. From this comparison, it is clear that Panasonic could charge a little over $500 for the Nocticron, and still make a profit.

Seriously? This vs 85L? I think that you need a 42.5mm f/0.6 to make a statement like that, but then it would be much bigger, heavier twice as expensive.
It's FF equivalent would be nice and small 85mm f/2.4-ish, and for the price, you could easily get a used FF camera with a nice 85/1.8 prime. Even a decent f/2.8 FF zoom lens could compete with it. Let's be honest, it is smaller, but how many f/1.2-f/1.4 primes would you need to compete with something like 70-200/2.8? How much would it cost and weight?

Direct link | Posted on Jan 9, 2014 at 00:24 UTC
On Sigma announces all-new 50mm F1.4 DG HSM 'Art' lens article (245 comments in total)
In reply to:

Digitall: Filter thread 77 mm!? wow

Just like the old one.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 6, 2014 at 22:54 UTC
On Sigma announces all-new 50mm F1.4 DG HSM 'Art' lens article (245 comments in total)

One more item on my wish-list :)

Direct link | Posted on Jan 6, 2014 at 22:52 UTC as 83rd comment
In reply to:

Zvonimir Tosic: As one user noted:

How bizarre. "Best" in what way? How to judge when so different?
– Is this Ford better than that Pepsi?
– Maybe this movie is better than that pasta sauce?
– Or perhaps this washing powder trumps that alarm clock?

"Best of the best camera" — across cameras of totally different applications, use, design paradigms and concepts for entirely different end goals — is an equally absurd attempt as choosing just one gold medalist at the Olympics to be "the best sports person of the Olympics".
It is totally denigrating and mind-numbing.

You don't have to choose the best of the best. It is just a figure of speech. Just vote for YOUR product of the year, or which one seems more important for you.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 4, 2014 at 02:55 UTC

Sony A7/A7R is the best.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 3, 2014 at 21:20 UTC as 71st comment | 2 replies
On Just posted: Our Canon EF 40mm f/2.8 STM lens review article (81 comments in total)
In reply to:

davidonformosa: I bought and I'm very happy with it. I'd still love to see more pancake lenses from Canon though. An EF-S 22mm f/2 pancake would be very desirable.

Maybe someday canon will update their 28/1.8USM with a cheaper STM version and (as a FF shooter) I'd prefer that over EF-S pancake.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 13, 2013 at 07:47 UTC
On Sigma 18-35mm F1.8 DC HSM Preview preview (349 comments in total)
In reply to:

Beat Traveller: Brace yourself... the 'equivalent aperture' posts are coming.

aperture ~ amount of light
exposure = amount of light * exposure time = aperture * shutter speed
ISO ~ pixel sensitivity (size and tech) * signal amplifier (processing)
image brightness = exposure * ISO = aperture * shutter speed * ISO
The magic happens when the image projection (the light) is captured as a digital image. Unlike the image projection, digital image doesn't lose its brightness when enlarged and that may be the cause for confusion. In the world of photography ISO means something. In the world of electronics ISO is just to make it simple for photographer to understand and calculate. If ISO values were reported objectively for each format then it would be like:
APS-C ISO 100-6400 real ISO 250-16000
P&S ISO 100-6400 real ISO 1000-64000
For example, 18mp APS-C camera can produce same image brightness as 18mp FF, but it doesn't mean that aperture has the same value for whatever pixel size there is, it means that smaller pixels are used with higher REAL ISO values.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 23, 2013 at 11:25 UTC
On Canon EOS 700D Rebel T5i preview (149 comments in total)

Next stop - EF-S 55-250/4-5.6 STM ?

Direct link | Posted on Mar 21, 2013 at 21:27 UTC as 44th comment
In reply to:

Pix Man: I've just bought one of these with the old 650D badge on. Same camera, different badge. Oh and the 700D is a whopping 69% more money than I paid for my new none grey import from the same UK dealer.

That's a very expensive new badge!

I'm afraid that 650D vs 700D has less differences than 650D vs T4i :))

Direct link | Posted on Mar 21, 2013 at 11:20 UTC
Total: 73, showing: 21 – 40
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