acidic

acidic

Lives in United States San Francisco, CA, United States
Joined on Nov 23, 2003

Comments

Total: 164, showing: 81 – 100
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In reply to:

mgblack74: 150mm @ f/5.8? Goodbye creative DOF!

You should shoot full frame. Goodbye!

Direct link | Posted on Jan 31, 2013 at 06:24 UTC

These are by far the nerdiest comments I have ever read on dpreview, excluding the techie stuff.

:-)

Direct link | Posted on Jan 29, 2013 at 19:12 UTC as 11th comment
On Mobile-friendly forums launched article (102 comments in total)

This will make it easy to write snarky responses while doing long exposure night photography.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 24, 2013 at 21:09 UTC as 69th comment

What happened to Tokina and Tamron? They joined MFT last year and we haven't seen anything yet.
http://www.dpreview.com/news/2012/01/26/Tamron_Tokina_join_MicroFourThirds

Direct link | Posted on Jan 22, 2013 at 06:01 UTC as 18th comment | 2 replies
On G-Form's G90 case turns smartphones into GoPros post (4 comments in total)

If priced right and functional, this is a fantastic concept and I imagine it'll sell quite well.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 11, 2013 at 22:53 UTC as 3rd comment

What does "T" mean? As in T3.1 and T2.2. Is this Cine-speak for "F"?

Direct link | Posted on Jan 11, 2013 at 18:44 UTC as 5th comment | 3 replies
On Canon Powershot N first impressions article (112 comments in total)

Too bad it didn't have a dedicated Facebook button. Canon are probably reserving that for the 5D Mk IV to take the place of the dedicted Print button that was introduced on the original 5D.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 7, 2013 at 20:46 UTC as 44th comment | 1 reply
On Canon Powershot N first impressions article (112 comments in total)
In reply to:

maniax: So you make a 12mpixel photo, upload by wifi to your phone to upload instantly to instagram / facebook which will be converted to a 0.5mpixel photo.

That's just.... great...

The iphone 8 rumoured to be released in 2016 will have a ultra-super-retina-plus display, capable of resolving 12MP. Canon is obviously ahead of the game.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 7, 2013 at 20:42 UTC
On The Lightroom catalog article (304 comments in total)
In reply to:

Aaron Shepard: I use Lightning for printing, because it excels at that. But I use Bridge and Camera Raw for editing, for several reasons:

-- Commands are much easier to locate than in Lightroom, which seems to revel in hiding important functions, including important ones available ONLY if you know the keyboard commands.

-- Camera Raw lets you choose the color space you want to edit in by changing the output space. The histogram then conforms to that space. Lightroom pretty much sticks you with ProPhoto, which isn't best for book publishing and doesn't match the original space of my camera's JPEGs. (Or do the new proofing functions take care of that?)

-- Camera Raw doesn't mess with your mind by asking you how to reconcile differences between image data and catalog data. It just reads the image data.

-- Most important, the editing area of Camera Raw is bigger than Lightroom's, so you can see more of your picture or see the whole thing bigger. This is important if you don't have a huge monitor.

"Sure, there are workarounds for everything. I prefer to use software that doesn't require them."

Fair enough. But every workflow I've come across requires at least some compromises/workarounds. No solution is perfect for me. LR comes closest.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 30, 2012 at 06:19 UTC
On The Lightroom catalog article (304 comments in total)
In reply to:

NoVI Photo: I have used LR for the last few years and find it far more efficient than PhotoShop for editing large batches of images from a single event. It takes seconds to set white balance, exposure, noise reduction, sharpening, etc. for the whole batch. I haven't used the keywords technique until reading this article. I just opened up all the catalogs that I made in 2012, and within a half hour attached keywords on the thousands of images. Like the image editing, it was very easy to select dozens of images at once and give them the same keywords. So far, so good.

But I fail to see the advantage of how this helps me find a particular image more quickly. I can search within a catalog to find an image that has been tagged with a particular keyword, which is a time saver, but only a small one since the catalog only contains images of a particular event anyway. I don't see how I can search other catalogs, or my hard drive for images with the same keyword. Am I missing something?

Creating and maintaining separate catalogs for each event defeats the purpose of LR's cataloging capability. What you're doing is akin to creating a separate iTunes Library for each and every album or artist.

Instead create one giant category, with all of your images in them. Import them as is, no need to move them into new directories. All of your 2012/Christmas photos can stay put.

You'll see the directory structure of all of your images in the left pane. When you conduct a keyword search, you can limit your search to specific directories, or search across directories and even search the entire catalog if you choose to do so. In addition to keywords, you can even create Collections, which allow you to categorize your images. You can even create hierarchical collections and subcollections (e.g. People>Family>Mom or Travel>USA>NY>NYC>Times Square).

Some people do like to create separate catalogs for their different types of work: wedding/commercial/personal/etc but I don't bother.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 30, 2012 at 06:13 UTC
On The Lightroom catalog article (304 comments in total)
In reply to:

tbcass: I like everything about Lightroom except the cataloging feature. I like to organize my photos by year and month. The necessity of having to import photos into the catalog is a royal pain in the A!!! I don't like it and wish I could turn off the cataloging feature and use it as a plain browser/editor..

If you don't need cataloging, then use Bridge.

If you're not going to use the database functionality of LR, there's no use using it.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 30, 2012 at 06:04 UTC
On The Lightroom catalog article (304 comments in total)
In reply to:

Tape5: A few men enter a closet and without user consultation design a software so counter-intuitive to operate that a gang of expert photographers are discussing how to use it more than a decade later.

Another Adobe success story.

Umm, version 1 wasn't released until 2007. It was in beta for a full year before that.

Sure, LR isn't the intuitive for anyone who doesn't understand databases. Photoshop's more advanced features aren't either. Nor is Oracle software. Even MS Excel is mysterious to many.

Point is pros need productivity tools that may not be easy to use for the layperson.

I'd say LR is definitely a success story for Adobe. Much more so than anything else comparable out there.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 29, 2012 at 10:21 UTC
On The Lightroom catalog article (304 comments in total)
In reply to:

Aaron Shepard: I use Lightning for printing, because it excels at that. But I use Bridge and Camera Raw for editing, for several reasons:

-- Commands are much easier to locate than in Lightroom, which seems to revel in hiding important functions, including important ones available ONLY if you know the keyboard commands.

-- Camera Raw lets you choose the color space you want to edit in by changing the output space. The histogram then conforms to that space. Lightroom pretty much sticks you with ProPhoto, which isn't best for book publishing and doesn't match the original space of my camera's JPEGs. (Or do the new proofing functions take care of that?)

-- Camera Raw doesn't mess with your mind by asking you how to reconcile differences between image data and catalog data. It just reads the image data.

-- Most important, the editing area of Camera Raw is bigger than Lightroom's, so you can see more of your picture or see the whole thing bigger. This is important if you don't have a huge monitor.

-- Examples of hidden commands in LR, please? Speaking of keyboard commands, one should learn to use them to increase workflow efficiency anyways.

-- LR sticks to ProPhoto, true. But you can export files to other color spaces in the Export dialog box. My workflow is pretty much Adobe 1998, which is smaller than ProPhoto (but not as small as sRGB). But I've adapted just fine. For color/density critical stuff, I get the image in the ballpark in LR while leaving some breathing room in the histo before sending off to PS as an Adobe RGB TIFF and finish the image off in PS.

-- Just have LR update using the image data just like ACR. No need to let it mess with your head. Don't let the software rule you. You're the ALPHA dog :-)

-- Haven't used Camera Raw in a while. I'm using a 24" 16:10 monitor and I can toggle into full screen mode with the F and Tab keys easily enough.

ACR and LR's raw conversion engine is the same, so I stick with LR since I use it for image management.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 29, 2012 at 09:39 UTC
On The Lightroom catalog article (304 comments in total)
In reply to:

GoremanX: None of this explains why I can't just use some other cataloging software and use Lightroom solely for image processing. I find the Lightroom catalog features to be sorely lacking, my preferred catalog software does a much better job of organizing and retrieving my images (yes, even different versions of the same image). But every time I want to process a photo in Lightroom, I have to trudge through the tedious import process, even for ONE STUPID PICTURE.

This forced Adobe cataloging crap is merely a means to lock users into a purely-Adobe workflow. Nothing more, nothing less. And it's insulting.

@daMatrix,
I used to use IMatch+ACR, and when LR first came out I started using it but didn't give up my previous workflow. Once LR2 came out and I was comfortable with it, I dumped the IMatch+ACR workflow. It wasn't that much work. All of my images were categorized, I used a script to convert the categories to IPTC keywords, and then in LR it's easy enough to search for those keywords for which I wanted categories and dumped them in appropriate categories. Not perfect, and still tweaking files from a couple years ago as I come across any that need more work. But overall not a big deal for me. Again, I work much faster and save loads of time, which equals more productivity and ultimately more money.

I do still use IMatch occasionally. Sometimes I need to export the IPTC and EXIF data from a set of my files, so I export them as low-res jpegs, import into IMatch, and export the metadata to csv.

@beeguy,
When you export in LR, you can set the color profile of the exported file.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 29, 2012 at 02:40 UTC
On The Lightroom catalog article (304 comments in total)
In reply to:

JohnyP: a few issues:
- Adobe LR is an ugly and slow product. I can forgive ugly, but can't forgive slow. That's on a Intel Quad Core CPU with enough RAM and an SSD drive (images are on a conventional 7200RPM drive)
- Tagging of pictures takes time that i don't have
- LR interface is not intuitive (at least to me).
- Junk Adobe installs along with LR is troubling (all kinds of executables get started ever time you boot a computer after LR installation)
- it costs too much
- doesn't solve the physical location issue (backups of my computer still contain just folders organized by some other method, not what is shown in LR)
- import process is annoying
- adobe bridge is a half joking attempt to recreate a Windows Explorer
- meta-data is not my best friend (maybe yours), not everyone needs to tag a blue flower picture with words "blue" and "flower".
- Creating a logical structure inside the LR vs physical structure on the HD is not really different or faster.

Article is not really useful

> "Adobe LR is an ugly and slow product."
I agree that it's slow. But what it lacks in speed, it makes up for in workflow. Overall, my LR/PS workflow allows me to save time from shoot to backup to organization to publication.

> "Tagging of pictures takes time that i don't have"
Then please tell me how you organize and retrieve photos in a timely manner.

> "meta-data is not my best friend (maybe yours)"
Then you should forget about any kind of image management and either go off of memory or a physical card catalog system. But you don't have the time.

> "it costs too much"
You gotta be kidding.

If you don't have the desire to organize images, that's fine. I for one have a catalog of hundreds of thousands of original RAW files plus tens of thousands of TIFF files from film scans. So for me, you're excuses aren't valid. A bit of time now saves me lots of time later. Obviously you have no need for any DAM so why bother posting?

Direct link | Posted on Dec 29, 2012 at 02:26 UTC
On The Lightroom catalog article (304 comments in total)
In reply to:

jonska: I use Lightroom and quite like it despite various shortcomings (the uploading features are a nightmare, as someone else mentioned).

Here's my problem: When I have gone through a shoot and processed to my satisfaction, I export a few images as jpegs. I do this at full quality and then resize using one of several other programs - mostly Irfanview. The reason I do this is that I want to see the *actual image* that I am uploading, sending by e-mail, burning to a cd etc. This can't be done in Lightroom which only alllows resizing at the time of exporting.

So. Now I have duplicates (i.e. jpeg exports), which I also want to keep (e.g. in case someone asks for a copy, I want to upload to another site etc.) and organise. This means that I now need a separate DAM programme to keep track of my jpegs (about 10% or less than the number of my raw images).

I'm sure others have this problem. What do you do?

"I'm sure others have this problem. What do you do?"

I don't have this problem at all. Anything that I export that I plan to keep on file, I make sure that it gets added back to the catalog. You can even stack the resultant jpegs with the original so that the it looks less cluttered.

ez pz.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 29, 2012 at 02:16 UTC
On The Lightroom catalog article (304 comments in total)
In reply to:

acidic: It should be noted that just because the LR Catalog file is backed up does not mean the image files are backed up. Someone will undoubtedly confuse the two and will lose their image files as a result.

My biggest gripe with LR is that it lacks metadata import/export functionality. It would be nice to be able to export IPTC/EXIF data form a catalog (or subset of the catalog) as a .csv file, as well as import that data back in. Many image databases allow this, so I'm sure Adobe is more than capable of adding such a feature.

Imagine creating an iTunes Library, importing your music, and categorizing it all (dinner party, love-making, workout, relaxing, road trip, etc). If you lost your Library file, you still have your mp3s, but your categories will be lost forever. LR catalog file is sort of like that. If you lose the catalog file, your images can still be safe, but much of the data that you associated with it is lost.

Now if you lose your images files, LR will still have a record of that image, but the image itself will be gone (except for the 'preview' and thumbnail). So it's important to back those up as well.

During the import process, LR offers the option of making a backup of that photo . If you're doing this, it makes sense to put the backup copy on a separate drive (in case the main drive crashes). Alternatively, you can backup the image via other methods, including burning to a disk, copying to a different drive, etc.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 28, 2012 at 23:50 UTC
On The Lightroom catalog article (304 comments in total)
In reply to:

acidic: It should be noted that just because the LR Catalog file is backed up does not mean the image files are backed up. Someone will undoubtedly confuse the two and will lose their image files as a result.

My biggest gripe with LR is that it lacks metadata import/export functionality. It would be nice to be able to export IPTC/EXIF data form a catalog (or subset of the catalog) as a .csv file, as well as import that data back in. Many image databases allow this, so I'm sure Adobe is more than capable of adding such a feature.

When you import an image into LR, LR notes it's location (e.g. C:/Photos/2012-12-28), and makes a preview.

When you make adjustments to an image within Lightroom (tonal adjustments, caption, keywords, catalogs, etc), those adjustments get stored in the LR catalog file. So when you look at an image in LR, it knows what information is associated with that image and it presents it to you (adjustments, captions, etc).

By default, all of this additional information is stored in the LR catalog file, and will not be embedded in the image.

The reason why the LR catalog file is so important is because it contains all of the instructions about where your images are, how they should be displayed, and what other information is associated with it.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 28, 2012 at 23:47 UTC
On The Lightroom catalog article (304 comments in total)
In reply to:

davidstock: I'm not convinced. If we are relying on metadata tags anyway, isn't it possible to search just as well in Bridge as in Lightroom? Personally, I like having a logical file folder system. But if for whatever reason I don't know where one of my files is, I simply do a metadata search in Bridge--just like in Lightroom.

The only downside of Bridge seems to be slightly longer backups, which I find to be a non-issue. I've never had it slow me down. (I use continuous automated backups, as well as late-night automated backups.)

The minor backup issue seems like a small trade-off for the security of having all the image data saved in the file itself. The internet is full of confused or desperate people who lost or damaged their Lightroom catalog because of a computer problem or even an upgrade to their hardware or software. I'd rather have files, complete with their metadata and processing, that can be opened in a variety of programs.

"...move a lot of photo files from one place to another on your computer - say from ...Drive C: to ...Drive E:. You will then have to re-compile the catalog."

No you won't. When Lightroom can't find the photos, you can just point to the new location. It's just like moving music files in your file browser, and then iTunes not being able to find it (only easier in LR). You can tell then tell it where to find those files.

Or you can just move the files from one drive to another from within LR.

Besides, it's not so often a LR user will move old pictures off of one drive and on to another. And if they have to recompile the catalog, so what? It's not like they're going to move the photos to a new drive routinely.

Bridge is limited to keywords, color codes, and stars. LR can do user-defined categories, hierachical ones at that, as well as manage a controlled vocabulary. If you don't have the need for any of this or don't understand the difference, then Bridge is fine for you.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 28, 2012 at 23:28 UTC
On The Lightroom catalog article (304 comments in total)
In reply to:

AlexBakerPhotoz: My problem is that I began storing digital images long before I started using Lightroom. I was for quite awhile a database designer and developer, so I understand the design and agree with it, I just wish I'd started with it at the beginning of my switch to digital photography 10 years ago. Now I have 82,300 images to date and it's like the plant in little shop of Horrors. I do have a semi-efficient folder system that I created when I was using Bridge, that works OK for me in Lightroom too, but the effort to go back and apply more data to all those old images in the catalog and also the xmp and xmp sidecars is daunting.

No problem. Just import those images in their exisitng folders into your LR catalog. No need to move those photos into new folders. Since you have them category folders, jut select one and add a bunch of broad keywords that represent each folder, and create a new category for it and apply that as well. As you have time, just go back and keyword/categorize in LR. No need to do it all at once. Doing in batches means that 82K images is probably more like 10K metadata edits (due to similar content).

This is a project that can take years. I've been using LR since v1, and I am still setting aside a couple hours a month to do just that for my old film scans. I still have lots of film to scan, and I don't anticipate finishing that until 2016 or so!

Direct link | Posted on Dec 28, 2012 at 23:17 UTC
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