acidic

acidic

Lives in United States San Francisco, CA, United States
Joined on Nov 23, 2003

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Total: 148, showing: 61 – 80
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On CP+ 2013: Interview with Canon's Masaya Maeda article (490 comments in total)

Canon should dump the M and jump into the m4/3 format. Though their sensor technology currently can't compete with what's in the OM-D or GH3, loyal Canon dSLR users looking to downsize or for a compact second body will likely find Canon's offerings attractive. Especially if they included an EF-S/EF to m4/3 adapter.

Additionally, unlike EOS M, a Canon m4/3 body would be a product compatible with a growing format.

And unlike EOS M lenses, Canon m4/3 lenses might appeal to not only Canon users, but to Oly and Panasonic users as well.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 1, 2013 at 17:47 UTC as 77th comment | 4 replies
On CP+ 2013: Interview with Canon's Masaya Maeda article (490 comments in total)
In reply to:

rpensotti: I agree with mpgxsvcd, Masaya Maeda should be fired now!
The statement about the doubtful future of the APS-C is irresponsible.
With the improvements in sensor technology, this format is still the best compromise for quality, bokeh and low light.
What about the hundred of thousands EF-S lenses out there?
The EOS-7D should have been ready before Xmas.
His comments about the Sony RX-100 are ridiculous
An RX-100 lookalike with a better hand grip and a little longer, wide zoom made by Canon will conquer a large share of the serious enthusiast market as the ideal take anywhere, or second camera.
Let's keep in mind that with a good in-camera panorama feature, a really short wide angle is not a must anymore.
Shame on you Canon, you are letting your constituency down!

"...the future of semi-pro DSLRs is probably full-frame..."

Allow me to emphasize SEMI-PRO DSLRS.

The only semi-pro dSLR with APS-C sensors that Canon currently offers is the 7D. Okay, if you insist, then let's throw the 60D in their as well (though I wouldn't consider it semi-pro by any means). Meanwhile, there are 4 or 5 entry level Rebel offerings, all with APS-C, and all perfectly compatible with EF-S lenses.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 1, 2013 at 17:30 UTC
On CP+ 2013: Interview with Canon's Masaya Maeda article (490 comments in total)
In reply to:

WilliamJ: I note no camera maker ever had the idea - isnt' business made to earn money ? - to design a camera that could be upgradable. The 1970-80's where the years of disposable items (lighters, razors, cameras and so on) but why not making the 2010's the era of items that could be upgradables ? Your camera is too slow ? Change of image processor. The sensor is too old ? Have a new one... That way, camera makers could get some more money to make a living without having to produce unrestly new now-super-complicated models with the bad results we can see far too often.

Hey, Mr Maeda ! That's a concept for you !

tkbslc is right. Computers are moving towards the 'disposable' category. Phones and tablets as well. Sure some components are replaceable (just like camera body components), but most are not upgradeable. Just look at all the glue they use in newer Apple products in lieu of screws. Sure it makes the product smaller, but certainly prevents it from being repairable/upgradeable.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 1, 2013 at 17:04 UTC
On First Impressions: Metabones Speed Booster article (357 comments in total)

So this thing will allow the NEX to control the Canon's aperture as well?

Direct link | Posted on Feb 1, 2013 at 05:39 UTC as 91st comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

mgblack74: 150mm @ f/5.8? Goodbye creative DOF!

You should shoot full frame. Goodbye!

Direct link | Posted on Jan 31, 2013 at 06:24 UTC

These are by far the nerdiest comments I have ever read on dpreview, excluding the techie stuff.

:-)

Direct link | Posted on Jan 29, 2013 at 19:12 UTC as 11th comment
On Mobile-friendly forums launched article (102 comments in total)

This will make it easy to write snarky responses while doing long exposure night photography.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 24, 2013 at 21:09 UTC as 69th comment

What happened to Tokina and Tamron? They joined MFT last year and we haven't seen anything yet.
http://www.dpreview.com/news/2012/01/26/Tamron_Tokina_join_MicroFourThirds

Direct link | Posted on Jan 22, 2013 at 06:01 UTC as 18th comment | 2 replies
On G-Form's G90 case turns smartphones into GoPros post (4 comments in total)

If priced right and functional, this is a fantastic concept and I imagine it'll sell quite well.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 11, 2013 at 22:53 UTC as 3rd comment

What does "T" mean? As in T3.1 and T2.2. Is this Cine-speak for "F"?

Direct link | Posted on Jan 11, 2013 at 18:44 UTC as 5th comment | 3 replies
On Canon Powershot N first impressions article (112 comments in total)

Too bad it didn't have a dedicated Facebook button. Canon are probably reserving that for the 5D Mk IV to take the place of the dedicted Print button that was introduced on the original 5D.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 7, 2013 at 20:46 UTC as 44th comment | 1 reply
On Canon Powershot N first impressions article (112 comments in total)
In reply to:

maniax: So you make a 12mpixel photo, upload by wifi to your phone to upload instantly to instagram / facebook which will be converted to a 0.5mpixel photo.

That's just.... great...

The iphone 8 rumoured to be released in 2016 will have a ultra-super-retina-plus display, capable of resolving 12MP. Canon is obviously ahead of the game.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 7, 2013 at 20:42 UTC
On The Lightroom catalog article (315 comments in total)
In reply to:

Aaron Shepard: I use Lightning for printing, because it excels at that. But I use Bridge and Camera Raw for editing, for several reasons:

-- Commands are much easier to locate than in Lightroom, which seems to revel in hiding important functions, including important ones available ONLY if you know the keyboard commands.

-- Camera Raw lets you choose the color space you want to edit in by changing the output space. The histogram then conforms to that space. Lightroom pretty much sticks you with ProPhoto, which isn't best for book publishing and doesn't match the original space of my camera's JPEGs. (Or do the new proofing functions take care of that?)

-- Camera Raw doesn't mess with your mind by asking you how to reconcile differences between image data and catalog data. It just reads the image data.

-- Most important, the editing area of Camera Raw is bigger than Lightroom's, so you can see more of your picture or see the whole thing bigger. This is important if you don't have a huge monitor.

"Sure, there are workarounds for everything. I prefer to use software that doesn't require them."

Fair enough. But every workflow I've come across requires at least some compromises/workarounds. No solution is perfect for me. LR comes closest.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 30, 2012 at 06:19 UTC
On The Lightroom catalog article (315 comments in total)
In reply to:

NoVI Photo: I have used LR for the last few years and find it far more efficient than PhotoShop for editing large batches of images from a single event. It takes seconds to set white balance, exposure, noise reduction, sharpening, etc. for the whole batch. I haven't used the keywords technique until reading this article. I just opened up all the catalogs that I made in 2012, and within a half hour attached keywords on the thousands of images. Like the image editing, it was very easy to select dozens of images at once and give them the same keywords. So far, so good.

But I fail to see the advantage of how this helps me find a particular image more quickly. I can search within a catalog to find an image that has been tagged with a particular keyword, which is a time saver, but only a small one since the catalog only contains images of a particular event anyway. I don't see how I can search other catalogs, or my hard drive for images with the same keyword. Am I missing something?

Creating and maintaining separate catalogs for each event defeats the purpose of LR's cataloging capability. What you're doing is akin to creating a separate iTunes Library for each and every album or artist.

Instead create one giant category, with all of your images in them. Import them as is, no need to move them into new directories. All of your 2012/Christmas photos can stay put.

You'll see the directory structure of all of your images in the left pane. When you conduct a keyword search, you can limit your search to specific directories, or search across directories and even search the entire catalog if you choose to do so. In addition to keywords, you can even create Collections, which allow you to categorize your images. You can even create hierarchical collections and subcollections (e.g. People>Family>Mom or Travel>USA>NY>NYC>Times Square).

Some people do like to create separate catalogs for their different types of work: wedding/commercial/personal/etc but I don't bother.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 30, 2012 at 06:13 UTC
On The Lightroom catalog article (315 comments in total)
In reply to:

tbcass: I like everything about Lightroom except the cataloging feature. I like to organize my photos by year and month. The necessity of having to import photos into the catalog is a royal pain in the A!!! I don't like it and wish I could turn off the cataloging feature and use it as a plain browser/editor..

If you don't need cataloging, then use Bridge.

If you're not going to use the database functionality of LR, there's no use using it.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 30, 2012 at 06:04 UTC
On The Lightroom catalog article (315 comments in total)
In reply to:

Tape5: A few men enter a closet and without user consultation design a software so counter-intuitive to operate that a gang of expert photographers are discussing how to use it more than a decade later.

Another Adobe success story.

Umm, version 1 wasn't released until 2007. It was in beta for a full year before that.

Sure, LR isn't the intuitive for anyone who doesn't understand databases. Photoshop's more advanced features aren't either. Nor is Oracle software. Even MS Excel is mysterious to many.

Point is pros need productivity tools that may not be easy to use for the layperson.

I'd say LR is definitely a success story for Adobe. Much more so than anything else comparable out there.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 29, 2012 at 10:21 UTC
On The Lightroom catalog article (315 comments in total)
In reply to:

Aaron Shepard: I use Lightning for printing, because it excels at that. But I use Bridge and Camera Raw for editing, for several reasons:

-- Commands are much easier to locate than in Lightroom, which seems to revel in hiding important functions, including important ones available ONLY if you know the keyboard commands.

-- Camera Raw lets you choose the color space you want to edit in by changing the output space. The histogram then conforms to that space. Lightroom pretty much sticks you with ProPhoto, which isn't best for book publishing and doesn't match the original space of my camera's JPEGs. (Or do the new proofing functions take care of that?)

-- Camera Raw doesn't mess with your mind by asking you how to reconcile differences between image data and catalog data. It just reads the image data.

-- Most important, the editing area of Camera Raw is bigger than Lightroom's, so you can see more of your picture or see the whole thing bigger. This is important if you don't have a huge monitor.

-- Examples of hidden commands in LR, please? Speaking of keyboard commands, one should learn to use them to increase workflow efficiency anyways.

-- LR sticks to ProPhoto, true. But you can export files to other color spaces in the Export dialog box. My workflow is pretty much Adobe 1998, which is smaller than ProPhoto (but not as small as sRGB). But I've adapted just fine. For color/density critical stuff, I get the image in the ballpark in LR while leaving some breathing room in the histo before sending off to PS as an Adobe RGB TIFF and finish the image off in PS.

-- Just have LR update using the image data just like ACR. No need to let it mess with your head. Don't let the software rule you. You're the ALPHA dog :-)

-- Haven't used Camera Raw in a while. I'm using a 24" 16:10 monitor and I can toggle into full screen mode with the F and Tab keys easily enough.

ACR and LR's raw conversion engine is the same, so I stick with LR since I use it for image management.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 29, 2012 at 09:39 UTC
On The Lightroom catalog article (315 comments in total)
In reply to:

GoremanX: None of this explains why I can't just use some other cataloging software and use Lightroom solely for image processing. I find the Lightroom catalog features to be sorely lacking, my preferred catalog software does a much better job of organizing and retrieving my images (yes, even different versions of the same image). But every time I want to process a photo in Lightroom, I have to trudge through the tedious import process, even for ONE STUPID PICTURE.

This forced Adobe cataloging crap is merely a means to lock users into a purely-Adobe workflow. Nothing more, nothing less. And it's insulting.

@daMatrix,
I used to use IMatch+ACR, and when LR first came out I started using it but didn't give up my previous workflow. Once LR2 came out and I was comfortable with it, I dumped the IMatch+ACR workflow. It wasn't that much work. All of my images were categorized, I used a script to convert the categories to IPTC keywords, and then in LR it's easy enough to search for those keywords for which I wanted categories and dumped them in appropriate categories. Not perfect, and still tweaking files from a couple years ago as I come across any that need more work. But overall not a big deal for me. Again, I work much faster and save loads of time, which equals more productivity and ultimately more money.

I do still use IMatch occasionally. Sometimes I need to export the IPTC and EXIF data from a set of my files, so I export them as low-res jpegs, import into IMatch, and export the metadata to csv.

@beeguy,
When you export in LR, you can set the color profile of the exported file.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 29, 2012 at 02:40 UTC
On The Lightroom catalog article (315 comments in total)
In reply to:

JohnyP: a few issues:
- Adobe LR is an ugly and slow product. I can forgive ugly, but can't forgive slow. That's on a Intel Quad Core CPU with enough RAM and an SSD drive (images are on a conventional 7200RPM drive)
- Tagging of pictures takes time that i don't have
- LR interface is not intuitive (at least to me).
- Junk Adobe installs along with LR is troubling (all kinds of executables get started ever time you boot a computer after LR installation)
- it costs too much
- doesn't solve the physical location issue (backups of my computer still contain just folders organized by some other method, not what is shown in LR)
- import process is annoying
- adobe bridge is a half joking attempt to recreate a Windows Explorer
- meta-data is not my best friend (maybe yours), not everyone needs to tag a blue flower picture with words "blue" and "flower".
- Creating a logical structure inside the LR vs physical structure on the HD is not really different or faster.

Article is not really useful

> "Adobe LR is an ugly and slow product."
I agree that it's slow. But what it lacks in speed, it makes up for in workflow. Overall, my LR/PS workflow allows me to save time from shoot to backup to organization to publication.

> "Tagging of pictures takes time that i don't have"
Then please tell me how you organize and retrieve photos in a timely manner.

> "meta-data is not my best friend (maybe yours)"
Then you should forget about any kind of image management and either go off of memory or a physical card catalog system. But you don't have the time.

> "it costs too much"
You gotta be kidding.

If you don't have the desire to organize images, that's fine. I for one have a catalog of hundreds of thousands of original RAW files plus tens of thousands of TIFF files from film scans. So for me, you're excuses aren't valid. A bit of time now saves me lots of time later. Obviously you have no need for any DAM so why bother posting?

Direct link | Posted on Dec 29, 2012 at 02:26 UTC
On The Lightroom catalog article (315 comments in total)
In reply to:

jonska: I use Lightroom and quite like it despite various shortcomings (the uploading features are a nightmare, as someone else mentioned).

Here's my problem: When I have gone through a shoot and processed to my satisfaction, I export a few images as jpegs. I do this at full quality and then resize using one of several other programs - mostly Irfanview. The reason I do this is that I want to see the *actual image* that I am uploading, sending by e-mail, burning to a cd etc. This can't be done in Lightroom which only alllows resizing at the time of exporting.

So. Now I have duplicates (i.e. jpeg exports), which I also want to keep (e.g. in case someone asks for a copy, I want to upload to another site etc.) and organise. This means that I now need a separate DAM programme to keep track of my jpegs (about 10% or less than the number of my raw images).

I'm sure others have this problem. What do you do?

"I'm sure others have this problem. What do you do?"

I don't have this problem at all. Anything that I export that I plan to keep on file, I make sure that it gets added back to the catalog. You can even stack the resultant jpegs with the original so that the it looks less cluttered.

ez pz.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 29, 2012 at 02:16 UTC
Total: 148, showing: 61 – 80
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