VadymA

VadymA

Lives in Canada Calgary, Canada
Joined on Jul 31, 2009

Comments

Total: 167, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous12345Next ›Last »
On Behind the Shot: Watery Grave article (91 comments in total)

Another vote for those who think that the image is overprocessed. Too much vignetting and too much contrast as well. To the point of being cartoonish really. And I also like the original image better. The foggy background actually resembles heavy fumes from dead fish adding to the gloomy atmosphere more than vignetting and heavy contrast. And the small rock is much more visible in the original image being almost like a symbol of gloominess with its dark colors and rough solid shape while the rest of the "world" is slowly disappearing in the fumes of death.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 21, 2015 at 04:21 UTC as 18th comment

It kind of makes me like my DSLR even more LOL

Direct link | Posted on May 21, 2015 at 06:05 UTC as 80th comment
On WH09_ISO200_f4.0_FX photo in dpreview review samples's photo gallery (5 comments in total)

This shot made me smile. Nice catch.

Direct link | Posted on May 13, 2015 at 05:04 UTC as 4th comment

First, great work by the photograper! Really enjoyed this gallery. From lens performance perspective, the only images I liked are those that were significantly stepped down. Everything between 1.6 and 2.0 Is just way too soft. I was expecting at least something to remain sharp in those samples but disappointingly that is not the case. Usually images like this are criticized unless they are taken with a cheap plastic lens or with a bottom from a beer bottle or something. Just my personal opinion.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 13, 2015 at 06:07 UTC as 8th comment | 1 reply

With all due respect, but to me every photo looks like it was taken from a photography text book; which is not a compliment in this case. It's like "Common, I've seen it hundreds times already". It has probably something to do with lack of submissions to this particular contest (3,300 entries is not that much, especially if the number of entries per person is not limited to one). Nice photos overall, but as many other mentioned too predictible, to the poin of looking almost like a cliche.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 3, 2015 at 20:12 UTC as 4th comment

Bread and Circuses came to my mind after seeing what people vote for.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 3, 2014 at 18:40 UTC as 11th comment
On Price released for Brikk's 24k gold Nikon Df article (389 comments in total)

I can see like this could be a good choice for a Christmas or Father's Day gift among super wealthy clients. Let's face it, unlike most of us, who are not as wealthy, they don't have that many choices when it comes to a descent camera. There is boring same-ol Leica, a couple of Hasselblad rebadged consumer-grade Sony or Panasonics and one too excentric Sigma, and that's about it. I am glad they finally have access to a descent Nikon camera.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 31, 2014 at 05:53 UTC as 132nd comment | 1 reply

"His notes on the sexual behavior of the penguins, which included violent assault, homosexuality and necrophilia, were considered too indecent for the times, and didn’t come to light until published in the journal Polar Record in 2012."

I wonder if such behavior of penguins was confirmed by any other studies. Otherwise it sounds more like carefully camouflaged notes on human behavior, especially during long and isolated expedition like Terra Nova.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 29, 2014 at 22:04 UTC as 7th comment | 4 replies
On Canon EOS 7D Mark II: Real-world samples (beta) article (268 comments in total)
In reply to:

Mr Gadget: I was hoping to see some action shots, sports, BIF, dog running toward the camera? Sequences? Low light, high ISO action? This camera is targeted towards that market segment. I have been waiting for a D300 replacement and it looks like Nikon wont be providing one, so I am thinking of moving to a 7DmkII. Your help would be appreciated!

Barney, just put it in your intro statement; it would be very helpful.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 29, 2014 at 18:38 UTC
In reply to:

VadymA: This interview reminded me of a story about two sales reps from a shoe company that went to study market demand in a remote African country. The first rep reported back to the company: "There is no market here as nobody wears shoes!" The second rep emailed: "Quick! Send as much as you can; there are millions of people without shoes!" Nikon looks like the first rep to me. Some companies wait for demand and some companies create demand. The longer they wait to finally see the writing on the wall, the harder it will be to win this game.

Good point, Maji. If we look at the entire Nikon line-up we can't entirely dismiss their efforts in bringing a variety of choices to their customers. And playing safe during financial turbulence in which Nikon currently is sounds reasonable too. Yes, being sympathetic to Nikon, I wish they were the one setting revolutionary trends in camera industry, but they are the ones who know how much money they have to spend on R&D and I still hope they make the right decisions even if those decisioans are not the most popular among some of their followers.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 24, 2014 at 19:09 UTC
In reply to:

VadymA: This interview reminded me of a story about two sales reps from a shoe company that went to study market demand in a remote African country. The first rep reported back to the company: "There is no market here as nobody wears shoes!" The second rep emailed: "Quick! Send as much as you can; there are millions of people without shoes!" Nikon looks like the first rep to me. Some companies wait for demand and some companies create demand. The longer they wait to finally see the writing on the wall, the harder it will be to win this game.

Maji, of course the story is not real; but it is still a good analogy of how opportunities could be seen differently. Nikon wants to see a demand first before offering something different and in the meantime spending their limited resources on developing very conservative products. Well, most likely the demand will shift to something smaller, lighter, and yet with better image quality. Have you ever seen a movie about the future where people would lug around cameras the size of a blender. When that happens, nikon will realize that whatever they were spending now on old-school cameras WAS a waste of money and with plummeting sales they may never have enough resources to play catch. I like my D300 but I already feel like a dinosaur with it in some public places.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 24, 2014 at 05:03 UTC

This interview reminded me of a story about two sales reps from a shoe company that went to study market demand in a remote African country. The first rep reported back to the company: "There is no market here as nobody wears shoes!" The second rep emailed: "Quick! Send as much as you can; there are millions of people without shoes!" Nikon looks like the first rep to me. Some companies wait for demand and some companies create demand. The longer they wait to finally see the writing on the wall, the harder it will be to win this game.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 24, 2014 at 00:46 UTC as 51st comment | 6 replies
On Nikon D750 First-impressions review preview (1418 comments in total)

Looks like Nikon let go their entire R&D department; all their new models look like rearrangement of the same parts; no innovation, no new ideas, nothing ;(

Direct link | Posted on Sep 12, 2014 at 04:31 UTC as 390th comment | 4 replies
On Fast and full-frame: Nikon announces 24MP Nikon D750 article (406 comments in total)
In reply to:

Suhas Sudhakar Kulkarni: Finally, announced!

But not what was expected :(

Direct link | Posted on Sep 12, 2014 at 04:18 UTC
In reply to:

JordanAT: If I stole your camera and took several hundred photos* and I was then captured by police and the stolen camera was returned to you - who owns the copyright to the images I took?

* for arguments sake, we might assume I know nothing about cameras and I took the photos in auto mode without changing the settings on the camera

508.01 Registration requirements.
To be entitled to copyright registration, a photograph, holo gram, or slide must contain at least a certain minimum amount of original expression.
Under your "assumptions", it is unlikely that the photos will contain sufficient amount of original expression to pass the examination test.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 8, 2014 at 20:59 UTC
In reply to:

Biological_Viewfinder: If you are on vacation and want a photograph of your family with you in it; you may seek the help of someone else.

So then, a random stranger is given your camera. He takes the photograph.

But who would ever argue that it was not your photograph?????

Also remember that not every snapshot is eligible for copyright protection. In your example, even if the "authorship" can be traced to you as the one making desicion to take a picture, providing a camera and directing the setting and composition, the picture may be lacking the required degree of "creative expression" making it ineligible for copyright protection.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 8, 2014 at 20:50 UTC
In reply to:

olsenn: If you dg deeply enough, absolutely anything can be traced to a human. For instace, photos cannot exist without cameras, and the camera is a man-made invention. Therefore, by that line of reasoning, no photos are ever produced "solely" by nature.

I agree. I think "solely by nature" or "solely by animal" is applicable to something that is regularly cretated by the forces of nature or by animals; not when a human being's deliberate interactions influence the nature or the anumals to create something that didn't exist before, like a painting or a photograph.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 8, 2014 at 18:28 UTC
In reply to:

Biological_Viewfinder: If I hand my camera to my child, and she takes a photograph that I post-process; it still belongs to me.

If I drop my camera off a cliff, and it hits a rock and takes a picture that I post-process; THE PHOTO STILL BELONGS TO ME!!!!

You would be considered the owner of the photos but may not be considered the author. Both the author and the owner are eligible for copyright protection, but other criteria also should be met for the work to be copyrightable - the authorship must be traceable to a human being, and there must be some level of creative expression present in the photos. If in both examples it was your intention to create the images that way than I think the authorship could be traced to you. However there might be not enough creative expression in both cases to qualify for copyright protection. In any case, THE PHOTOS WILL STILL BELONG TO YOU!!! ;^D

Direct link | Posted on Aug 8, 2014 at 18:18 UTC

202.02(b) Human author.
The term "authorship" implies that, for a work to be copyrightable, it must owe its origin to a human being. Materials produced solely by nature, by plants, or by animals are not copyrightable.

How hard it is to trace the origin of the monkey's pictures to a human being after all that work the photographer has done to make it happen (planning and making a trip, living with the tribe, gaining their trust, letting them play with equipment, bringing the pictures back, processing them)? Who if not Mr. Slater is the author of those highly original pictures?How can someone claim that they were produced SOLELY BY NATUTE, BY PLANTS, or BY ANIMALS?

Direct link | Posted on Aug 7, 2014 at 21:57 UTC as 247th comment | 7 replies
In reply to:

PassinThru: Most of the people arguing for copyright going to the human seemed to be based on a sort of moral outrage about what's right and wrong, or want assign copyright based on the owner of the equipment. Intent to take pictures also seems to play a large part for many, whether the human took them or not.

A much more interesting discussion would happen if you followed the "Copyright law" link in the 4th paragraph. It's not as clear cut as anyone is saying.

While 503.03 talks about works not originated by a human author, this is discussed in the context of painting and sculpture produced by random processes. Note: photography is explicitly discussed in section 508, not here.

508.01 talks about what qualifies: it boils down to "composition", done by the photographer when the picture is taken.
508.02 talks about what doesn't qualify. It seems to cover trap photos well.

Why don't we talk about the CopyRight Office Practices doc instead of some vague sense of injustice?

I have to admit that I am among those who appeal to the ethical grounds of the issue. I am glad you pointed to the link and I looked at section 508 carefully. I have to disagree with regard to the trap shots - there is nothing at all referring to trap shots in the law. The way I read it, if a trap shot contains "at least a certain minimum amount of original expression" it is qualifiable. The law does not say anything about who press the shutter either. So it should be clear that Mr. Slater has the right to be protected by the Law - his photographs are loaded with "original expression".

Direct link | Posted on Aug 7, 2014 at 21:43 UTC
Total: 167, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous12345Next ›Last »