yakkosmurf

yakkosmurf

Lives in United States TX, United States
Works as a Engineer
Joined on Jun 8, 2006

Comments

Total: 8, showing: 1 – 8
On Olympic torch to make first-ever spacewalk news story (117 comments in total)
In reply to:

massimogori: It is interesting to know that NASA is now taking pictures for the Russians. Maybe they are available for some weddings, too.

Thanks for the interesting update, Dpreview!

NASA is not taking pictures for the Russians. A NASA photographer is on hand to photo document the space travels of an American being launched into space. Much like Japanese photographers were there due to a Japanese astronaut being on this mission. When the launch doesn't involve an American, no NASA photographer is present.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 12, 2013 at 14:09 UTC
On Olympic torch to make first-ever spacewalk news story (117 comments in total)
In reply to:

Mr Fartleberry: I'd rather you tell us how many Hasselblads there are aboard the ISS.

Correct answer is none. All still cameras aboard ISS are Nikons. A mix of D2X, D3, and now D4.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 12, 2013 at 14:07 UTC
On Olympic torch to make first-ever spacewalk news story (117 comments in total)
In reply to:

alegator: That first picture looks like a graveyard...I wouldn't enter a russian rocket, not even drunk.

The Soyuz is the safest and most reliable manned launch vehicle ever. The foreground of the first photo is pilings setup years ago for a new set of buildings that was never completed. Baikonur is full of such relics. Bill frequently uses those as foregrounds in his pictures when he's out there.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 12, 2013 at 14:05 UTC
On Olympic torch to make first-ever spacewalk news story (117 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jogger: Im sure NASA would have done the same if they had the capacity to take people into space.

And NASA did in 1996 when they had the Shuttle flying and the Atlanta Olympics...

Direct link | Posted on Nov 12, 2013 at 14:03 UTC
On Olympic torch to make first-ever spacewalk news story (117 comments in total)

First of all, Bill takes amazing photographs. I had the pleasure of watching him work for a week before a launch a few years ago. He's a great photographer, and a great individual. Interestingly enough, he shoots Canon and Nikon gear at the same time. Canon gear for the remotes, and Nikon for the handheld shots he does.

As for the torch launch, remember that NASA did the same thing with the Olympic torch for the Atlanta games that was launched on Space Shuttle Atlantis back in 1996. Only difference here, is that the cosmonauts had a spacewalk planned, and took the torch out into space for a few minutes among the other work they were doing outside anyway this weekend. Which is quite in family with the task of hitting a golf ball off of the ISS that the Russians did during a spacewalk in 2006.

Enjoy Bill's photos. He's doing a wonderful job of photo documenting things that are truly monumental in the history of our society.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 12, 2013 at 14:02 UTC as 8th comment
On Mars rover camera project manager explains 2MP camera choice news story (187 comments in total)

We use up-to-date Nikon still cameras and Canon pro video cameras on the ISS. In a few years, the space radiation environment kills a high number of pixels on those sensors (especially the video cameras), and we have to swap them for a newly launched one. That isn't an option for Curiosity...obviously. Likewise, we see issues with large capacity flash memory cards for these cameras as well.

From what I've seen of the impacts on consumer hardware (even once extra shielding is added) in the space environment, I completely agree with their design decisions.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 9, 2012 at 11:48 UTC as 42nd comment | 5 replies
On NASA captures the earth at night with Nikon D3S news story (159 comments in total)
In reply to:

yakkosmurf: They are spectacular movies. Having seen the astronauts use the SS-HDTV camera several times on ISS, I can tell you it's not a D3. It's a special camera built by a Japanese group of scientists. Perhaps it has some D3 components in it, but it's definitely not a D3. Although, we do have a whole bunch of D3S and D3X cameras on ISS.

Yes, and I was trying to point out it was mistaken from looking at the actual documentation the crew uses to take the footage. The SS-HDTV camera is a custom unit of proprietary nature from JAXA. Mike Fossum has done some wonderful shots with the D3S' low light capabilities on orbit, but these movies are taken with a special camera that's flying as an experiment to ISS.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 15, 2011 at 16:03 UTC
On NASA captures the earth at night with Nikon D3S news story (159 comments in total)

They are spectacular movies. Having seen the astronauts use the SS-HDTV camera several times on ISS, I can tell you it's not a D3. It's a special camera built by a Japanese group of scientists. Perhaps it has some D3 components in it, but it's definitely not a D3. Although, we do have a whole bunch of D3S and D3X cameras on ISS.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 14, 2011 at 21:51 UTC as 73rd comment | 3 replies
Total: 8, showing: 1 – 8