segarci1

segarci1

Lives in United States Sacramento, CA, United States
Works as a Engineer
Joined on Feb 15, 2005

Comments

Total: 6, showing: 1 – 6

This is an incremental improvement in camera connectivity, but the real innovation here is in separating the lens from the viewfinder/monitor (I can come up with precedents, but not in this usage space). This opens up a world of possibilities beyond what articulated monitors offered in prior consumer cameras. The Sony video illustrated this well.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 4, 2013 at 22:21 UTC as 26th comment
On The Lightroom catalog article (315 comments in total)
In reply to:

segarci1: I've gotten comfortable at managing my Lightroom catalog and image files on one computer. I'm still at a loss on how to efficiently work on images on multiple machines; e.g., do rough edits on a notebook computer in the field, then fine tune on a different machine back in the studio. How do you port all the edits over without having to go the XMP sidecar route?

graybalanced... thanks for the tip. I will give that a try.

Dropbox -- or something like it -- would be one approach, but probably too slow to be productive. I can't imagine keeping many gigs of images and the catalog in sync without lots of waiting, not to mention bandwidth usage.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 29, 2012 at 20:45 UTC
On The Lightroom catalog article (315 comments in total)

I've gotten comfortable at managing my Lightroom catalog and image files on one computer. I'm still at a loss on how to efficiently work on images on multiple machines; e.g., do rough edits on a notebook computer in the field, then fine tune on a different machine back in the studio. How do you port all the edits over without having to go the XMP sidecar route?

Direct link | Posted on Dec 29, 2012 at 07:03 UTC as 61st comment | 6 replies
In reply to:

segarci1: "The digital moment" is relative. Whether 1/1000th of a second, or 1/60th of a second, or several slices time over multiple exposures. These can all achieve different exposure results without corrupting the journalistic integrity of the image.

My point was that it's a matter of scale. When a digital device captures a physical signal, it could actually be accumulating multiple signal samples over multiple clocks. (Albeit, most digital cameras probably sense an image over one continuous interval - although you could get some multi-sample situations as with flash ghosting, but I digress.) HDR could simply take this to a more "macro" time scale. What if the HDR process was completely contained within a single shutter press? Or what if the HDR process avoided any form of human intervention except for exposure tuning?

Direct link | Posted on Feb 5, 2012 at 17:58 UTC

"The digital moment" is relative. Whether 1/1000th of a second, or 1/60th of a second, or several slices time over multiple exposures. These can all achieve different exposure results without corrupting the journalistic integrity of the image.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 4, 2012 at 16:29 UTC as 79th comment | 3 replies

Epson PX720WD = Epson Artisan 725?

Direct link | Posted on Jul 23, 2011 at 14:55 UTC as 42nd comment
Total: 6, showing: 1 – 6