Pat Cullinan Jr

Pat Cullinan Jr

Lives in United States United States
Joined on Sep 21, 2010

Comments

Total: 442, showing: 21 – 40
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On Nikon video hints at long-desired 'digital FM' news story (554 comments in total)

What a nonsensical, affected teaser.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 26, 2013 at 06:42 UTC as 114th comment
On Another Hasselblad Rebadge or Photoshopped Hoax? news story (187 comments in total)
In reply to:

Lawrence33: dpr just removed my 'Post' they must not like what I said about this Site ?
All the small minded comments from 'Amateurs' must have offended someone here.

tabloid - Thank You.
The EXPERTS in this field have all come here to set the world right.
After 50 years in photography, with most every film camera out there. And I now work in digital, Nikon and Leica, and I would like to say to the big egos.
You can all dine on my shorts. Now, smile, ' click '

Here I am with knife and fork.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 23, 2013 at 06:15 UTC
On Sony Cyber-shot RX1R Samples Gallery Expanded! news story (70 comments in total)
In reply to:

Vladik: Pretty amazing photo quality. I want one :)

Howie,

Can you show an example of banding?

Thx.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 20, 2013 at 05:48 UTC
On DSCF8167-ACR photo in dpreview review samples's photo gallery (1 comment in total)

Nice-looking couple.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 31, 2013 at 08:30 UTC as 1st comment
On IMGP0215 photo in dpreview review samples's photo gallery (2 comments in total)
In reply to:

Pat Cullinan Jr: Playing "roundball" on a beautifully sunny day. That's real living. And a school for rootedness.

Can I ask what city this is?

Got it!

It's the Notre Dame School of Manhattan, a Catholic prepatory school for girls, founded in 1912 by the Sisters of St. Ursula, and located at 327 West 13th Street between Hudson Street and 8th Avenue in Greenwich Village.

I felt those New York vibes. Manhattan, the roundball navel of the planet. Oora.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 16, 2013 at 01:54 UTC
On IMGP0215 photo in dpreview review samples's photo gallery (2 comments in total)

Playing "roundball" on a beautifully sunny day. That's real living. And a school for rootedness.

Can I ask what city this is?

Direct link | Posted on Jun 15, 2013 at 23:41 UTC as 1st comment | 1 reply
On IMGP0218 photo in dpreview review samples's photo gallery (2 comments in total)

Sunny roofs and shady dales -- like the New York I grew up in. Nice contemplative shot.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 15, 2013 at 23:34 UTC as 1st comment
On IMGP0226 photo in dpreview review samples's photo gallery (1 comment in total)

Don't wrap it. I'll eat it here.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 15, 2013 at 23:27 UTC as 1st comment
On Hasselblad Lunar interchangeable lens camera now shipping news story (371 comments in total)
In reply to:

Erik Ohlson: Det är inte klåk!

det är skit!

Direct link | Posted on Jun 12, 2013 at 02:58 UTC
On Sigma 18-35mm F1.8 DC HSM Preview preview (352 comments in total)
In reply to:

Pat Cullinan Jr: Richard,

For your sake please consult with a large-format pro or other grizzled adept about "the greater low-light ability that a larger sensor would otherwise give."

Len speed remains constant.

All the best,

Pat

...continued.

Let's say that B = nA, where n is some fractional value < 1. Then nE amount of light energy will be falling on area B, and the brightness over area B will be nE/B = nE/nA = E/A, which is the same as the brightness over the larger area. This long-winded presentation shows that, although a larger area captures more light energy, the brightness remains the same vis-a-vis a smaller area. I hope no one's turning to stone over this.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 11, 2013 at 09:43 UTC
On Sigma 18-35mm F1.8 DC HSM Preview preview (352 comments in total)
In reply to:

Pat Cullinan Jr: Richard,

For your sake please consult with a large-format pro or other grizzled adept about "the greater low-light ability that a larger sensor would otherwise give."

Len speed remains constant.

All the best,

Pat

Joe,

The FF shooter shoots at 1.8, just like the APS-C shooter. The inherent speed of a lens doesn't change if you use it on a big or a small sensor. The angle of acceptance, or angular coverage, changes, but not the lens speed.

Imagine a large-format photog shooting a scene at 5.6 with 8x10 film. If he now changes the format to 5x7, he will shoot the scene at 5.6 also. The required exposure hasn't changed. Only the format has changed. What it boils down to is the fact that THE BRIGHTNESS OF THE IMAGE AT THE FOCAL PLANE DOESN'T DEPEND ON THE SIZE OF THE PIECE OF FILM YOU PUT THERE. Put that way, I guess it sounds more or less obvious.

"But, Pat, doesn't a larger format glom more light energy?"

Yes, it does, but that energy is shmeared over a bigger area, so there is no net gain in brightness of image.

Let's say we have E amount of light energy falling on an area A per unit time. Then the brightness of the image is measured by E/A. Now imagine a portion B of this area...

Direct link | Posted on Jun 11, 2013 at 09:33 UTC
On Sigma 18-35mm F1.8 DC HSM Preview preview (352 comments in total)

Richard,

For your sake please consult with a large-format pro or other grizzled adept about "the greater low-light ability that a larger sensor would otherwise give."

Len speed remains constant.

All the best,

Pat

Direct link | Posted on Jun 11, 2013 at 02:07 UTC as 48th comment | 11 replies
On Hasselblad Lunar interchangeable lens camera now shipping news story (371 comments in total)

говно!

Direct link | Posted on Jun 11, 2013 at 01:53 UTC as 139th comment
In reply to:

Pat Cullinan Jr: <quote>should provide the depth-of-field control and low-light image quality on an APS-C DSLR that you'd get using an F2.8 zoom on 35mm full-frame.</quote>

The aperture of a lens is quite independent of the format of the film or sensor. In other words, f/1.8 is f/1.8 whether the lens is placed before an APS-C sensor or a full-frame sensor. The intensity of the light striking the target is the same whether you have a small or a large target. The aperture is a function solely of the focal length and the entrance "pupil" (meaning the diameter of the circle of light you see when you look through the lens from the rear).

I hope everybody understands this, because otherwise you'll be making disadvantageous decisions or doing things wrong.

P.S. I meant 411.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 8, 2013 at 09:53 UTC
In reply to:

Pat Cullinan Jr: <quote>should provide the depth-of-field control and low-light image quality on an APS-C DSLR that you'd get using an F2.8 zoom on 35mm full-frame.</quote>

The aperture of a lens is quite independent of the format of the film or sensor. In other words, f/1.8 is f/1.8 whether the lens is placed before an APS-C sensor or a full-frame sensor. The intensity of the light striking the target is the same whether you have a small or a large target. The aperture is a function solely of the focal length and the entrance "pupil" (meaning the diameter of the circle of light you see when you look through the lens from the rear).

I hope everybody understands this, because otherwise you'll be making disadvantageous decisions or doing things wrong.

Dear Richard,

Hate to say it, but what you're saying isn't entirely true. I understand what you're saying, though.

What you can do is

1) talk to a large-format photographer and ask about changing formats while using the same lens.

or

2) call me (because my PC is dying). 911, Brooklyn, Patrick Cullinan. I'll be glad to help. After 9 PM Eastern, any day but Sunday.

All the best,

Pat

Direct link | Posted on Jun 8, 2013 at 00:34 UTC
In reply to:

Pat Cullinan Jr: <quote>should provide the depth-of-field control and low-light image quality on an APS-C DSLR that you'd get using an F2.8 zoom on 35mm full-frame.</quote>

The aperture of a lens is quite independent of the format of the film or sensor. In other words, f/1.8 is f/1.8 whether the lens is placed before an APS-C sensor or a full-frame sensor. The intensity of the light striking the target is the same whether you have a small or a large target. The aperture is a function solely of the focal length and the entrance "pupil" (meaning the diameter of the circle of light you see when you look through the lens from the rear).

I hope everybody understands this, because otherwise you'll be making disadvantageous decisions or doing things wrong.

@JensR

You're right. I should have said "relative aperture" or "f-stop."

"Aperture" just-plain means entrance pupil, and is measured in mm, as you say.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 7, 2013 at 21:32 UTC
In reply to:

Pat Cullinan Jr: <quote>should provide the depth-of-field control and low-light image quality on an APS-C DSLR that you'd get using an F2.8 zoom on 35mm full-frame.</quote>

The aperture of a lens is quite independent of the format of the film or sensor. In other words, f/1.8 is f/1.8 whether the lens is placed before an APS-C sensor or a full-frame sensor. The intensity of the light striking the target is the same whether you have a small or a large target. The aperture is a function solely of the focal length and the entrance "pupil" (meaning the diameter of the circle of light you see when you look through the lens from the rear).

I hope everybody understands this, because otherwise you'll be making disadvantageous decisions or doing things wrong.

P.S.

I cordially recommend The Focal Encyclopedia of Photography, Michael R. Peres, Focal Press. The Kindle edition is up to the moment (2012). The print edition was published in 2007. The Focal Press website presents their complete offering (http://www.focalpress.com/).

Direct link | Posted on Jun 6, 2013 at 23:20 UTC
In reply to:

Pat Cullinan Jr: <quote>should provide the depth-of-field control and low-light image quality on an APS-C DSLR that you'd get using an F2.8 zoom on 35mm full-frame.</quote>

The aperture of a lens is quite independent of the format of the film or sensor. In other words, f/1.8 is f/1.8 whether the lens is placed before an APS-C sensor or a full-frame sensor. The intensity of the light striking the target is the same whether you have a small or a large target. The aperture is a function solely of the focal length and the entrance "pupil" (meaning the diameter of the circle of light you see when you look through the lens from the rear).

I hope everybody understands this, because otherwise you'll be making disadvantageous decisions or doing things wrong.

[continued] It's called relative aperture because it relates the bigness of the lens opening to the focal length.

A reference for this is Sidney F. Ray, Applied Photographic Optics, London and Boston: Focal Press, 1988, ISBN 0-240-51226-X. This, however, is gruesome stuff! You can read an excerpt of Ch. 14, The Speed of a Lens, on p. 122 at http://books.google.com/books?id=cuzYl4hx-B8C&printsec=frontcover&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0#v=onepage&q&f=false. You can get the book for $70, delivered. Focal Press is the best. They've been publishing outstanding books for generations.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 6, 2013 at 22:54 UTC
In reply to:

Pat Cullinan Jr: <quote>should provide the depth-of-field control and low-light image quality on an APS-C DSLR that you'd get using an F2.8 zoom on 35mm full-frame.</quote>

The aperture of a lens is quite independent of the format of the film or sensor. In other words, f/1.8 is f/1.8 whether the lens is placed before an APS-C sensor or a full-frame sensor. The intensity of the light striking the target is the same whether you have a small or a large target. The aperture is a function solely of the focal length and the entrance "pupil" (meaning the diameter of the circle of light you see when you look through the lens from the rear).

I hope everybody understands this, because otherwise you'll be making disadvantageous decisions or doing things wrong.

The DOF part is correct, but the part about "low-light image quality," which amounts to (maximum) aperture, isn't. The maximum aperture is called lens speed (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lens_speed). Imagine a lens casting an image on a wall. Light energy is falling on the wall at a certain rate (energy per second per unit area). This rate is called intensity. It's intensity that determines the photographic effect on the film or the sensor. The intensity is the same whether you put a small sensor or a large one on the wall. Or, suppose you're shooting a subject using a view camera with a 5.6 lens and 5x7 sheet film. Now suppose you want to shoot some subjects with 4x5 film. You're lens is still 5.6! The lens speed doesn't change. Speed depends only on the diameter of the lens (actually, the "entrance pupil") and the focal length. The Wikipedia article "F-number" gives the relation N = f/D, i.e., f-number (aperture) = focal length over entrance pupil.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 6, 2013 at 22:42 UTC
In reply to:

InTheMist: Hm.

Pretty ugly ring bokeh but very interesting nonetheless.

Are we talking about "onion ring" bokeh here? ;)

Direct link | Posted on Jun 6, 2013 at 07:55 UTC
Total: 442, showing: 21 – 40
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