Pat Cullinan Jr

Pat Cullinan Jr

Lives in United States United States
Joined on Sep 21, 2010

Comments

Total: 874, showing: 21 – 40
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In reply to:

Pat Cullinan Jr: One small step for Adobe, one small step for Adobe.

Ha ha -- that's a good one.

Link | Posted on Jun 22, 2016 at 19:04 UTC
On article Rare Nikon 1200mm F11 pops up on eBay (114 comments in total)
In reply to:

Old Minolta Guy: Failed to mention:
2400mm F22 on Micro43
3240mm on NIkon 1

Instead of "DOF-EQUIVALENCE," it might be better to use another term, like "DOFness," or "DOFity," or "DOFitude."

Link | Posted on Jun 22, 2016 at 19:02 UTC
On article Rare Nikon 1200mm F11 pops up on eBay (114 comments in total)
In reply to:

Old Minolta Guy: Failed to mention:
2400mm F22 on Micro43
3240mm on NIkon 1

The DPR piece cited presents a "Real-world depth-of-field demonstration." They're talking about depth of field, that is, DOF-EQUIVALENCE. This is a matter of geometry, and in my opinion it's very misleading to call this "equivalence" at all. So the Nikon 1200mm f/11 on a micro 4/3 sensor would deliver the same depth of field as an aperture of f/22 on a full-frame sensor. This is to be distinguished from BRIGHTNESS-EQUIVALENCE, which is a matter of optical energetics. An f/11 lens on a FF sensor will be f/11 on an m43 sensor. A third species of equivalence can be termed ANGLE-OF-ACCEPTANCE-EQUIVALENCE, or MAGNIFICATION-EQUIVALENCE. In this sense, the 1200mm f/11 Nikon lens on an m43 sensor will deliver the same magnification as a 2400mm lens on an FF sensor. In summary, our Nikon lens, when used with an m43 sensor, is equivalent, relative to FF, to 2400mm f/11 AS REGARDS EXPOSURE, and to 2400mm f/22 AS REGARDS DEPTH OF FIELD. (I think I've lost the entire room by now.)

Link | Posted on Jun 22, 2016 at 18:58 UTC
On article All about that lens: Sony Cyber-shot RX10 III review (380 comments in total)
In reply to:

Pat Cullinan Jr: I'm sold. Know why? THE-RED-HEADED PARROT.

Robin Wong sure has taken some outstanding bird photos.

Link | Posted on Jun 22, 2016 at 16:10 UTC
On article All about that lens: Sony Cyber-shot RX10 III review (380 comments in total)

I'm sold. Know why? THE-RED-HEADED PARROT.

Link | Posted on Jun 22, 2016 at 08:08 UTC as 57th comment | 4 replies
On article All about that lens: Sony Cyber-shot RX10 III review (380 comments in total)
In reply to:

Lawrencew: As a DSLR user I did have some concerns about PQ before buying my RX10III.
There are clearly scenarios where my DSLR remains superior, but I have found myself using the RX10III more and more because in many scenarios it is the equal of my DSLR (unless you go real deep pixel peeping), and the convenience of RX10III package means I can simply grab the RX10III and know it will do a good enough job without having to change lenses.
When my wife yells "quick.. take a photo of that before it goes...", I was tired of saying "sorry... I haven't got the right lens on..."
Also, I wanted a decent 4K movie. Something my Canon DSLR is not capable of. The movie modes on the RX10III are terrific. Especially combined with the range of the lens. Being able to shoot 4K movies at 600mm is fantastic for wildlife. It's going to cost 4x as much to do that with a 5DMKIV and a 600mm lens (if the IV does 4k)
So overall, I am very pleased with my RX10III

Good wrap.

Link | Posted on Jun 22, 2016 at 08:07 UTC
On article All about that lens: Sony Cyber-shot RX10 III review (380 comments in total)
In reply to:

georgehere: Sony is trying to find a niche and in all the wrong places. The lens is so slow, it's practically useless. They should have tried to make a 8.8-40mm/1.7 lens (24-105/4.8 FFEQ) for that sensor and that would have been selling like hot cakes.

1.7 is 1.7. That is a matter of optical energetics. But DOF-wise, it would be > 1.7 with a larger sensor. That is a matter of geometry.

Link | Posted on Jun 22, 2016 at 08:02 UTC
On article All about that lens: Sony Cyber-shot RX10 III review (380 comments in total)
In reply to:

Frank C.: need to go to 600mm for any decent bokeh... mm...if you like your 1" sensor, you can keep your 1" sensor

I kept my doctor, only he now charges seven million dollars a visit.

Link | Posted on Jun 22, 2016 at 07:55 UTC
On article All about that lens: Sony Cyber-shot RX10 III review (380 comments in total)
In reply to:

DavidNJ100: In fail to see how this is better than an A6300 with a Tamron 16-300mm lens with adapter. The A6300 with the Tamron is a 24-400 equivalent with a bit faster lens, especially on the wide side, than this 1" sensor Sony.

It is also lighter...the A6300, Tamron lens, and EF-S to E-mount adapter weighing less than 2 lbs. Total cost is similar, within 10% or so.

The Tamron is F3.5-6.3, not that fast.

DPR, using memorably mordant language, described the Tamron's CA at 200-300mm as "prodigious." [http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/tamron-16-300mm-f-3-5-6-3-di-ii-vc-pzd-macro/4]

Link | Posted on Jun 22, 2016 at 07:53 UTC
On article All about that lens: Sony Cyber-shot RX10 III review (380 comments in total)
In reply to:

NotReallyMe: Well if nothing else, this must be the best tasting camera DPR has ever reviewed...
(4 out of 5 of the photos on the Intro page have been seasoned to taste, lol)

Ha ha! Stick a fork in it.

Link | Posted on Jun 22, 2016 at 07:36 UTC
On article All about that lens: Sony Cyber-shot RX10 III review (380 comments in total)

Concerning the photo of the baseball field--

The right-hand edge isn't very sharp, whereas the left-hand edge is sharp. Could this be a decentering problem?

Link | Posted on Jun 22, 2016 at 07:28 UTC as 59th comment | 5 replies
On article All about that lens: Sony Cyber-shot RX10 III review (380 comments in total)

>I usually bring a 50mm-or-wider prime lens
>(or fixed prime lens camera), and unless
>I'm shooting sports, I stick to 135mm-or-wider
>lenses for other gigs in general.

Prudent observation. Let it sink in.

Link | Posted on Jun 22, 2016 at 07:21 UTC as 60th comment

One small step for Adobe, one small step for Adobe.

Link | Posted on Jun 22, 2016 at 05:43 UTC as 17th comment | 8 replies
On article Hasselblad to announce 'game changer' next week (455 comments in total)
In reply to:

Pat Cullinan Jr: Wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden.

Let me put it this way -- a zinga zanga zunga dud, a thinga thanga thunga thud, kong azootie.

Link | Posted on Jun 20, 2016 at 04:24 UTC
On article Hasselblad to announce 'game changer' next week (455 comments in total)

Wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden wooden.

Link | Posted on Jun 19, 2016 at 04:09 UTC as 75th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

Pat Cullinan Jr: Made by slave labor. Xixiang Town, ShenZhen, Guangdong, China.

Before the Civil War in this country, many people in the North would not purchase the products of slave labor. Maybe it's not as simple as that.

Sounds like communist propaganda to me.

Link | Posted on Jun 18, 2016 at 01:03 UTC
On article Hasselblad to announce 'game changer' next week (455 comments in total)

News that hasn't happened yet.

Link | Posted on Jun 18, 2016 at 01:00 UTC as 150th comment
In reply to:

Pat Cullinan Jr: Made by slave labor. Xixiang Town, ShenZhen, Guangdong, China.

Before the Civil War in this country, many people in the North would not purchase the products of slave labor. Maybe it's not as simple as that.

You can surely understand how it could vex a person's conscience to buy products of slave labor -- or we could at least call it terribly exploited labor. Everybody knows how sweatshops are roundly denounced in this country. Why then should we draw the line for Red China? Does conscience count for nothing? I won't get into the story of the Chinese worker who came home from work to learn that the authorities had seized his wife and forcibly aborted his baby. It's hardly better in this country -- 60 million Americans aborted since 1973. You don't have to be a religion maniac to see something wrong about that. And shall we just forget about the Tien An Men Square Massacre? It would take a revolution to change a regime possessed of such malice as that. The wolf changes his skin, not his mind.

Link | Posted on Jun 17, 2016 at 10:58 UTC
In reply to:

Pat Cullinan Jr: Made by slave labor. Xixiang Town, ShenZhen, Guangdong, China.

Before the Civil War in this country, many people in the North would not purchase the products of slave labor. Maybe it's not as simple as that.

I suggest we get back to our topic -- lenses.

Link | Posted on Jun 17, 2016 at 05:23 UTC
In reply to:

Pat Cullinan Jr: Made by slave labor. Xixiang Town, ShenZhen, Guangdong, China.

Before the Civil War in this country, many people in the North would not purchase the products of slave labor. Maybe it's not as simple as that.

Falun Gong members appear every now and then in New York's Grand Central Station witnessing to government harassment. I saw them there last Wednesday.

Link | Posted on Jun 17, 2016 at 05:16 UTC
Total: 874, showing: 21 – 40
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