aardvark7

aardvark7

Joined on Jun 21, 2005

Comments

Total: 62, showing: 41 – 60
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On article Evolution of an image (123 comments in total)
In reply to:

aardvark7: With regard to aesthetic merits, each to his own and one can't argue.
As to success, that goes hand in hand with individual taste too.

However, the essence of this article seems to have been missed by all but one who commented.

The author talks of perserverance and illustrates that by mentioning the number of visits to a site. To me, this is not perserverance, but rather making use of the opportunity.

99.9% of all photographers will not have the luxury to make such trips, even if they had the desire. It may be too expensive or they have other calls on their time. It is simply not an option and the only way they get 'the shot' is by lucky chance of being there at the appropriate time in the first place.

Any time the subject comes up as to the most important thing in photography, I always say 'Opportunity' and this article demonstrates exactly that.

Give most the opportunity and even a basic camera and there would be bucketloads of quality shots. Most simply don't get the chance.

Despite that I have never suggested anyone is forced to do anything (???) I would ask:

If you have spent years learning your trade, will this article help?

No

If you don't have the time, will this article help?

No.

And if you don't have the intelligence to appreciate what is necessary, will this article help?

No.

I say again, this article only reinforces my position that for much of good photography, opportunity is key (not planning or perserverence as you can do neither without the opportunity) and opportunity, in this particular case, is the realm only of the professional landscape photographer or the very wealthy.

Link | Posted on Aug 10, 2012 at 20:15 UTC
On article Evolution of an image (123 comments in total)
In reply to:

aardvark7: With regard to aesthetic merits, each to his own and one can't argue.
As to success, that goes hand in hand with individual taste too.

However, the essence of this article seems to have been missed by all but one who commented.

The author talks of perserverance and illustrates that by mentioning the number of visits to a site. To me, this is not perserverance, but rather making use of the opportunity.

99.9% of all photographers will not have the luxury to make such trips, even if they had the desire. It may be too expensive or they have other calls on their time. It is simply not an option and the only way they get 'the shot' is by lucky chance of being there at the appropriate time in the first place.

Any time the subject comes up as to the most important thing in photography, I always say 'Opportunity' and this article demonstrates exactly that.

Give most the opportunity and even a basic camera and there would be bucketloads of quality shots. Most simply don't get the chance.

I too think that the location is irrelevant. However, my point remains that such time and endeavour is a luxury very few can afford.

If it was my job to be a landscape photographer, as it is for the author, not hurricane or firestorm would keep me away. But it isn't, so I rarely have any opportunity, and that applies to almost all of us.

We simply don't have the wherewithal to plan such shots, nor to keep improving on them should they not be to our satisfaction, even if that is on our doorstep!

I do agree with the intent of the article, for the most part, but I feel it is a little naive (even patronising) to be preaching to those who instinctively realise it to be so, would love to be in that position, yet will never get the chance.

Link | Posted on Aug 10, 2012 at 16:26 UTC
On article Evolution of an image (123 comments in total)
In reply to:

aardvark7: With regard to aesthetic merits, each to his own and one can't argue.
As to success, that goes hand in hand with individual taste too.

However, the essence of this article seems to have been missed by all but one who commented.

The author talks of perserverance and illustrates that by mentioning the number of visits to a site. To me, this is not perserverance, but rather making use of the opportunity.

99.9% of all photographers will not have the luxury to make such trips, even if they had the desire. It may be too expensive or they have other calls on their time. It is simply not an option and the only way they get 'the shot' is by lucky chance of being there at the appropriate time in the first place.

Any time the subject comes up as to the most important thing in photography, I always say 'Opportunity' and this article demonstrates exactly that.

Give most the opportunity and even a basic camera and there would be bucketloads of quality shots. Most simply don't get the chance.

I'm not sure why it is such a hard point to get across, so I'll try again:

I 'AM' one of those who want to take their time, paint the perfect picture, visit a place as often as necessary...but I can't!!!!

I don't have the money or the free time (by some huge degree in both regards!!).

It is not about eye, intention, perserverence, equipment or luck. It is about the simple realities of life. For whatever reason, I am in the same position as 99.999999999% of the population of this world and do not have the opportunity to do as the author of the article. Pure and simple.

Certainly, if an opportunity presents itself I will try to make the most of it and it may well be that, even if I did, my shots would not be as acceptable, but that is completely beside the point.

In some respects, it is why I find such articles rather depressing, as they seem to imply that to get the shot you absolutely need to do what is not an option, thereby rendering the advice rather pointless.

Link | Posted on Aug 10, 2012 at 13:19 UTC
On article Evolution of an image (123 comments in total)

With regard to aesthetic merits, each to his own and one can't argue.
As to success, that goes hand in hand with individual taste too.

However, the essence of this article seems to have been missed by all but one who commented.

The author talks of perserverance and illustrates that by mentioning the number of visits to a site. To me, this is not perserverance, but rather making use of the opportunity.

99.9% of all photographers will not have the luxury to make such trips, even if they had the desire. It may be too expensive or they have other calls on their time. It is simply not an option and the only way they get 'the shot' is by lucky chance of being there at the appropriate time in the first place.

Any time the subject comes up as to the most important thing in photography, I always say 'Opportunity' and this article demonstrates exactly that.

Give most the opportunity and even a basic camera and there would be bucketloads of quality shots. Most simply don't get the chance.

Link | Posted on Aug 10, 2012 at 11:30 UTC as 33rd comment | 6 replies
In reply to:

zonoskar: The strange thing is, in 2002 Canon released the 1Ds with an 11MPix full-frame sensor. So why choose a 2MPix sensor for the rover 2 years later?

IljaM,

Please, you need to take your own advice to heart.

To quote from the horses mouth, which is there in white and black above:

"There are three ways for Curiosity, to broadcast data back to Earth - but it's only the UHF transmitter that can be used for transmitting the amounts of data required for sending back images. 'The UHF antenna transmits to two spacecraft orbiting Mars, which relay the results back to Earth. That's where most of the data is coming from. It gives us on the order of 250 megabits per day, and that's got to be shared between a bunch of instruments, so there's not much bandwidth for the cameras.' Ravine explains."

Link | Posted on Aug 9, 2012 at 16:32 UTC
In reply to:

zonoskar: The strange thing is, in 2002 Canon released the 1Ds with an 11MPix full-frame sensor. So why choose a 2MPix sensor for the rover 2 years later?

Strange? Did you not read the article??
The only strange thing is people finding it odd, when bandwidth for large pictures is bad enough here on Earth, let alone 100 million miles away...sheesh!

Link | Posted on Aug 9, 2012 at 13:16 UTC
In reply to:

aired: Very likely another fake landing. Black and white photos again? Low res photos? !!!Average person will associate low resolution and grinny and de colored photos as more authentic and real than vivid high resolution photos!!!

Black and white photos and videos can mask the fake artificial lights. In pro photography world one that can shoot and edit color professionally can do black and white easily. But not the case for black and white only photographer.

The light source that look too close to the subject can be identified

That's right! They've sent a device to transmit fake images from Mars to support the fake mission...
Even if one nation tried to fake it, you can bet your bottom dollar others would pont out the lack of a signal that should be there, much as the Russians would certainly have tracked the Apollo craft and screamed from the rooftops if it was a pretence.

Link | Posted on Aug 9, 2012 at 13:14 UTC

The only thing I find strange is that many people wondered or criticised and NASA felt it necessary to explain why, when the reasons were obvious to the meanest intelligence.

It was a monumentally difficult task, sending such kit so far to such a hostile environment, the real wonder is that they can do it at all, let alone the spectacular success they have achieved.

Link | Posted on Aug 9, 2012 at 07:19 UTC as 49th comment | 1 reply

That such a report creates a 'hoo-hah' speaks volumes for consumers, unfortunately.

The truth is there is a company which, amongst other things, makes cameras of various kinds. I'm certain it will continue to make many models. What name they choose to print on the front has absolutely no effect on the internals whatsoever.

That people seem to think otherwise says to me that too many are interested, not in the actual product and how well it does its job, but rather whether it has the right name on the front.

A sad indictment of our society :(

Link | Posted on Jul 17, 2012 at 14:02 UTC as 24th comment

The element I find most curious is only alluded to now and then, rather than stated categorically: that Fotki pay someone for the hosting are actually only an intermediary.

From the outside, it would seem that they have allowed the financial situation between them and the server owners to reach breaking point before addressing the issue.

Whether the suddeness of the crisis is down to Fotki management or that of the hosting company doesn't appear to be clear.

However, it could be viewed as not entirely accurate to say that members' pictures were safe. It would depend on the nature of any contract between that company and Fotki as to whether they could just pull the plug and delete everything without reference to the Fotki members. Only Fotki might have any legal responsibility in that respect, but where there are no assets there is no recompense.

The long term management of 'un-culled' media storage will always become too vast to cope, so such problems are inevitable in 'the cloud'.

Link | Posted on Jun 14, 2012 at 09:58 UTC as 18th comment

Where all these ideas fall down is forgetting the nature of our own human weaknesses.

It is fine having all this facility for data storage and manipulation (as that is all it is), but unless one has a very organised mind and have initially put in place suitable indexes that mean something, extracting any of the useful data becomes more complex and difficult.

I'm very logical, but often I have to search my own computer to find a particular file and that is potentially tiny in comparison.

Also, there is more and more concern over access by third parties. It will become ever more difficult to keep your privacy and make decisions over possible future risks (how many times do people regret releasing things into the web?)

Ultimately, the possibilities and nature of the cloud clash with the limitations and nature of us as humans, and such a clash may well bring more problems than solutions.

Link | Posted on Mar 16, 2012 at 09:54 UTC as 50th comment | 1 reply
On article Olympus OM-D E-M5 low light high ISO sample series (283 comments in total)
In reply to:

T3: I would so love to have that 45/1.8 in black. It would look so much better on the black body. Come on, Oly!

What mysterious shop is already selling this camera before it is officially available???

Link | Posted on Mar 9, 2012 at 20:03 UTC
On article Book Review: Vivian Maier, Street Photographer (150 comments in total)

She is now the photographer to whose talent I most aspire and I will certainly be buying the book.

A fabulous eye and yet she wasn't looking for acknowledgement, but apparently pursued her own interests and enjoyment.

Unfortunately, we are unlikely ever to see her kind again.

If I was to attain even a tenth of her artistic skill, no-one would ever see my work as it would all be on transitory electronic storage and the likelihood of it being of any use when I die, let alone anyone having sufficient curiosity to investigate, is small indeed.

Link | Posted on Feb 19, 2012 at 15:25 UTC as 52nd comment
On article Tamron releases image-stabilized 24-70mm F2.8 zoom (190 comments in total)

I don't know about other makes, but the main issue for me using third party lenses on a Sony is that the data for the lens in the microadjust system is not always correct.
Consequently, adjusting for one can overwrite that for another lens, leaving focus errors.
If Sony were to release all the background information and I could be sure of no conflicts, this would be of interest. As it is, Sony won't guarantee the body will support the lens properly and Tamron will almost certainy say their lens will work correctly, leaving the customer to discover the truth for himself!

Link | Posted on Feb 6, 2012 at 16:53 UTC as 74th comment | 1 reply

To a large degree, all truth is about subjective perception.
Photography is no different, but man will always discuss the nature of such truths, as it affects how we interact with our world, our life and our very existence.

Link | Posted on Dec 28, 2011 at 17:55 UTC as 35th comment
On article Complete our survey for the chance to win an iPad 2 (117 comments in total)

Do my views not count anymore as I've been a full time pro for the last few years?

I was an amateur before and when I'm taking shots of my family and holidays I'm pretty sure no-one pays me...

I do think the desciption of the survey runs the risk of rendering it less than useful, although that wouldn't make it unique amongst surveys!

Link | Posted on Nov 21, 2011 at 21:46 UTC as 67th comment
On article Adobe announces Carousel - cloud-based image service (33 comments in total)

I'm in agreement with Itchhh, plus I find it enough of a chore uploading my files from CF cards to my own servers. To add the difficulties of your average broadband into the mix I won't be signing up for this anytime soon.

I do appreciate the appeal on some levels, but I see too many weak links in the chain.

Link | Posted on Sep 7, 2011 at 19:41 UTC as 20th comment
In reply to:

aardvark7: As with all the other samples, they are very poor and would ordinarily end up 'on the cutting room floor'!

Even when trying to apply the single stated advantage, that of selecting focus point, it is so inaccurate and arbitrary, that the 'gain' is actually a negative. To see what I mean, just try getting the earring in focus on the first sample shot...

Even if this system succeeded to some degree, the thought of having to fool around afterwards with every shot, just to optimise focus, sends shivers down my spine! It's bad enough post processing 500 - 1000 wedding shots when I've pretty well nailed the focus and the exposure is already reasonably good. Add this into the mix and you are looking at nervous breakdown territory!!!

All that said, I'm with Joe on this: it's complete hooey!

So what, might I ask, is the point of the samples?
They purport to show the results, but don't! Merely a feeble impression.
We are told that the majority of use (certainly initially) will be for Facebook et al., but this only demonstrates it is not even usable for that.
The only conclusions then are that the device is even more useless than common sense suggests and far less likely to see the light of day than has been stated.

Link | Posted on Aug 22, 2011 at 07:59 UTC

As with all the other samples, they are very poor and would ordinarily end up 'on the cutting room floor'!

Even when trying to apply the single stated advantage, that of selecting focus point, it is so inaccurate and arbitrary, that the 'gain' is actually a negative. To see what I mean, just try getting the earring in focus on the first sample shot...

Even if this system succeeded to some degree, the thought of having to fool around afterwards with every shot, just to optimise focus, sends shivers down my spine! It's bad enough post processing 500 - 1000 wedding shots when I've pretty well nailed the focus and the exposure is already reasonably good. Add this into the mix and you are looking at nervous breakdown territory!!!

All that said, I'm with Joe on this: it's complete hooey!

Link | Posted on Aug 19, 2011 at 10:28 UTC as 38th comment | 3 replies
On article Lytro plenoptic camera used for fashion shoot (100 comments in total)

Carefully selected shots which are both low resolution and seem to only have two distinct focus planes (rather than many) do nothing to suggest that this will have any use other than a curiosity for the foreseeable future.
Also, as I have mentioned before, the nature of moving the decison about focus and depth of field to part of post-processing risks the artistic process.
I'm far from convinced and this demonstration does nothing to cahnge that view.

Link | Posted on Jul 25, 2011 at 20:00 UTC as 91st comment
Total: 62, showing: 41 – 60
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