KoKo the Talking Ape

KoKo the Talking Ape

Joined on May 16, 2012

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Total: 32, showing: 21 – 32
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On Just Posted: Nikon Coolpix P310 review article (156 comments in total)

From the review: "Pocket-sized cameras with manual controls have become increasingly popular.... Arguably, Canon started it off with the S90 (a form factor that is now on its third iteration, the S100)."

I'll argue that. My beloved S80 had full PASM. IIRC, so did the S70 and S60.

A quibble, but I always felt those cameras were underappreciated. :-)

And thanks for the review, DPR!

Direct link | Posted on Jun 24, 2012 at 04:12 UTC as 25th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

time traveler: I hope this camera can shoot Full HD video and work with my EF-mount lenses (at least with adapter). Oh one more thing, I need a bigger camera bag... :)

Definitely, a bigger camera bag. I would also definitely need that carbon-fiber tripod I've been eyeing... :-)

Direct link | Posted on Jun 24, 2012 at 03:37 UTC
In reply to:

KoKo the Talking Ape: I notice that the image captures quite a wide angle. I imagine that is because that spherical lens is designed that way. Is that required, or could you get that high resolution in a narrower field of view? Getting a very high pixel image is not all that groundbreaking if you get those pixels by taking a bigger (wider angle) image.

And is there a theoretical limit to pixels per solid angle in an image, aside from lens limitations? How many pixels are actually in the light within a given field of view?

@JorgeLima, thank you for the comment. You are helping me refine my fuzzy thinking. So let me ask a different question. Is there a theoretical limit to the *information* that a sensor could receive in a a given solid angle? And like rbyll, you mention the diffraction limits created by optics. So just for fun, suppose we do away with optics. How much data could an infinitely refined and sensitive sensor capture in a given solid angle? That might be a quantum physics question.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 24, 2012 at 03:35 UTC
In reply to:

KoKo the Talking Ape: I notice that the image captures quite a wide angle. I imagine that is because that spherical lens is designed that way. Is that required, or could you get that high resolution in a narrower field of view? Getting a very high pixel image is not all that groundbreaking if you get those pixels by taking a bigger (wider angle) image.

And is there a theoretical limit to pixels per solid angle in an image, aside from lens limitations? How many pixels are actually in the light within a given field of view?

@rbyll, thank you for that information. Very interesting! So already the DARPA approach, which allegedly should work for up to 50GP, could approach practical resolution limits. I wonder if atmospheric blur for landscapes would be greater than astronomic photos because the air is polluted, heated by the ground, full of weather, etc., or if it would be LESS because astronomic photos are taken through through the entire depth of the atmosphere, albeit much attenuated at the higher altitudes.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 24, 2012 at 03:29 UTC
In reply to:

Reilly Diefenbach: Your tax dollars at work. More welfare for the military industrial complex. I really don't think it's for shooting Yosemite.

@Button: how much fraud in social support programs is there, actually? How many dollars actually go to people who do not otherwise deserve it? If you make a guess, I will do some research and come up with as reliable a figure as I can find. Deal?

Re military spending, record-keeping is so poor that the GAO has never been able to conduct an audit. There are reports of billions of dollars in CASH sent to Iraq that simply went missing. No records, no trace.

@knutjb, I don't quite follow your first paragraph. Re civil service having lower standards of ethics, that is quite a sweeping statement. Isn't it possible that certain civil departments have different standards than others? My understanding is the social services programs like Social Security and Medicaid are run carefully because people like you and me watch them constantly for waste. Other departments, like the financial or mining regulators, supposedly get away with murder.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 24, 2012 at 03:20 UTC

I notice that the image captures quite a wide angle. I imagine that is because that spherical lens is designed that way. Is that required, or could you get that high resolution in a narrower field of view? Getting a very high pixel image is not all that groundbreaking if you get those pixels by taking a bigger (wider angle) image.

And is there a theoretical limit to pixels per solid angle in an image, aside from lens limitations? How many pixels are actually in the light within a given field of view?

Direct link | Posted on Jun 22, 2012 at 19:20 UTC as 66th comment | 5 replies
In reply to:

Reilly Diefenbach: Your tax dollars at work. More welfare for the military industrial complex. I really don't think it's for shooting Yosemite.

Agree with knutjb that DARPA has been generally productive. But so have civilian basic research centers, like the famous Bell Labs.

Also agree that defense spending is not like welfare. Welfare is better managed and goes to needy people.

Interesting fact: the US spends on average over $250B *per year* just for military operations defending oil shipments from the Persian Gulf. That would amount to about 1/4 of the current military budget, though the actual proportion changes year to year. When we burn gasoline, we spend federal dollars, just as sure as when we give out foreign aid (currently about $30B).

Direct link | Posted on Jun 22, 2012 at 19:13 UTC

The Facebook page is stunningly uninformative about this event.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 5, 2012 at 00:43 UTC as 15th comment
On Over 2000 year old cities challenge (10 comments in total)

I am shocked and amazed that there are no photos of American cities here. What gives? Anti-American sentiment? We already apologized for that business back there, and also that other thing. And, well, maybe there was one or two smaller things.

Look, most of us don't vote, okay?

Direct link | Posted on May 19, 2012 at 04:03 UTC as 2nd comment
In reply to:

KoKo the Talking Ape: Is anybody else surprised at how steady the platform is in the space-based photos like the second one above? I would expect vibration from pumps and motors, thermal expansion or contraction, etc. ISS thing is not connected to the ground or anything else to damp out vibration.

Mmm, mass doesn't automatically mean no vibration. If you hang a massive steel girder in midair and rap it, it still vibrates. Also, the thing isn't isn't a monolith. It is constructed in sections which may be able to vibrate semi-independently. Also, now that I think of it, you would get shocks passing through the structure from things bumping together.

Probably the simplest answer is that the camera is on some kind of vibration-dampening mount. Maybe it isn't necessary, but if I were them, I'd use one.

Direct link | Posted on May 17, 2012 at 06:10 UTC

Is anybody else surprised at how steady the platform is in the space-based photos like the second one above? I would expect vibration from pumps and motors, thermal expansion or contraction, etc. ISS thing is not connected to the ground or anything else to damp out vibration.

Direct link | Posted on May 16, 2012 at 17:23 UTC as 8th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

Paul Farace: "faded futurism of space travel" -- I am painfully aware they may be right... thanks largely to our hip prizzy and entitlement-stoned government.

Hi all! First post.

In reply to the first post: "faded futurism" doesn't look shiny and new, but who cares? From an engineering point of view, if something works reliably, then it is a waste of money to replace it.

Direct link | Posted on May 16, 2012 at 17:20 UTC
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