AlanG

AlanG

Lives in United States Silver Spring, United States
Works as a Photographer
Has a website at www.goldsteinphoto.com
Joined on Mar 3, 2003

Comments

Total: 365, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

halfwaythere: Hopeless guy shooting with inferior Canon equipment this day and age. Just imagine how better this image would've been with a Sony sensor-ed camera.

There are always limitations.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 13, 2015 at 21:53 UTC
In reply to:

halfwaythere: Hopeless guy shooting with inferior Canon equipment this day and age. Just imagine how better this image would've been with a Sony sensor-ed camera.

Part of the creative process involves blowing out highlights and blocking up shadows when you feel either approach helps communicate you vision. Not everyone shooting b/w followed the zone system with the goal of capturing as much of the brightness range in every scene as is possible.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 13, 2015 at 16:46 UTC
In reply to:

halfwaythere: Hopeless guy shooting with inferior Canon equipment this day and age. Just imagine how better this image would've been with a Sony sensor-ed camera.

I probably didn't make it clear but I was responding to Don Sata's statement, "Possibly all the highlights surrounding the sunset would not be burnt out and orangeish. Also the bottom center zone would have detail."

Direct link | Posted on Jul 11, 2015 at 23:20 UTC
In reply to:

halfwaythere: Hopeless guy shooting with inferior Canon equipment this day and age. Just imagine how better this image would've been with a Sony sensor-ed camera.

Yeah, that would make the photo much much better. Geez...

Direct link | Posted on Jul 11, 2015 at 14:08 UTC
On Mono a mono: Leica M Monochrom (Typ 246) hands-on article (665 comments in total)
In reply to:

AlanG: Converting from a color capture gives one much more control over an image than one can get by using a monochrome camera with filters.

Despite this camera being targeted to serious b/w enthusiasts, it seems to me that this would be quite an inferior way to produce b/w photos for those who really want to control the way various colors are depicted in grayscale.

Astroscan, in post processing, you could selectively lighten or darken complementary colors in a given scene... such as yellow and blue. You can't do that with filters. You also could select a specific color or region... such as the blue in the sky, while leaving other blue items unchanged. There really is no comparison when it comes to tone control.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 1, 2015 at 19:33 UTC
On Mono a mono: Leica M Monochrom (Typ 246) hands-on article (665 comments in total)

Converting from a color capture gives one much more control over an image than one can get by using a monochrome camera with filters.

Despite this camera being targeted to serious b/w enthusiasts, it seems to me that this would be quite an inferior way to produce b/w photos for those who really want to control the way various colors are depicted in grayscale.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 1, 2015 at 13:39 UTC as 99th comment | 10 replies
In reply to:

darngooddesign: Since the new Monochrom is the the only Leica that causes this problem it is logical to assume there is something nona-standard in it's DNG files.

So, the real question is whether Apple had access to one of the cameras, or even Monochrom-produced DNGs, before the current version of Photos shipped.

But yeah, Apple bad...rabble rabble rabble.

Somehow I can't stop thinking that it must be Obama's fault.

Direct link | Posted on May 23, 2015 at 18:16 UTC
On Canon EOS 5DS R real world sample gallery posted article (444 comments in total)
In reply to:

photofan1986: Images look good, for sure, but I see that as an amateur photographer, I really don't want a über-high megapixel camera.

Well I don't think we disagree about the way DOF tables are expressed or standardized around normal viewing distances. But if you want people to be able to closely examine fine detail in your large prints you have to figure out how much resolution and DOF you need for that.

Many photographers feel the need for that extra detail otherwise we could routinely follow the basic DOF lens scales and use cameras whose resolution tops out at about 300dpi on an 8x10 print.

Direct link | Posted on May 16, 2015 at 15:11 UTC
On Canon EOS 5DS R real world sample gallery posted article (444 comments in total)
In reply to:

photofan1986: Images look good, for sure, but I see that as an amateur photographer, I really don't want a über-high megapixel camera.

"But then you're not seeing the whole image, so you're comparing apples to oranges. You need to step back and when you do, you get the same DOF. Google the PDF from Zeiss "DOF and Bokeh" as this applies to all DOF calcs."

The point is that few follow that viewing distance idea today and are looking at large monitors close up, sometimes at 100%. We often scan details in a print and don't just look at the entire image.

You do understand that one needs a higher resolution image to make larger prints for many applications don't you? The reason is they are often seen at distances closer than their diagonal. A double page glossy magazine spread of a watch or jewelry is a good example. Whereas you can make a billboard from an iPhone image.

Direct link | Posted on May 15, 2015 at 22:22 UTC
On Canon EOS 5DS R real world sample gallery posted article (444 comments in total)
In reply to:

photofan1986: Images look good, for sure, but I see that as an amateur photographer, I really don't want a über-high megapixel camera.

You can't really look that closely at a smaller print unless you use a magnifying glass. And the printing process itself only has so much resolution. DOF tables generally are calculated for an 8x10 print at about a 14 inch viewing distance.

Separately, I can't see any reason to fault a camera for having high resolution unless you just don't want to deal with the larger file size or price of the camera.

Direct link | Posted on May 15, 2015 at 22:16 UTC
On Canon EOS 5DS R real world sample gallery posted article (444 comments in total)
In reply to:

photofan1986: Images look good, for sure, but I see that as an amateur photographer, I really don't want a über-high megapixel camera.

The way DOF field works is that it is calculated for a specific size circle of confusion at a given magnification (print size) and a given viewing distance. So if you assume a very high res original image, a smaller print at a great viewing distance will have more DOF than a larger print at a closer viewing distance. Even if printed from the same image.

If the camera and lens produces an image with greater resolution, it has the potential for higher magnification without losing sharpness where the lens was focused, thus it can make a larger print which will have less DOF field at a given viewing distance. E.g. you will more easily be able to differentiate the sharpest area from the area that is just starting to get soft.

Direct link | Posted on May 15, 2015 at 19:25 UTC
On Lily Camera flies itself and follows its owner article (153 comments in total)

Not having interchangeable batteries is idiotic and will drastically affect usefulness and sales. Check out 3D Robotic's Solo to see what others are doing.

Direct link | Posted on May 14, 2015 at 17:17 UTC as 20th comment

I know some people see this stupid. But as an architectural shooter I can picture a number of cases where minimizing reflections in glass on interiors and exteriors would have saved me a lot of retouching.

Direct link | Posted on May 14, 2015 at 17:06 UTC as 20th comment
On Canon EOS 5DS R real world sample gallery posted article (444 comments in total)
In reply to:

photofan1986: Images look good, for sure, but I see that as an amateur photographer, I really don't want a über-high megapixel camera.

DOF is also dependent on the resolution if that resolution results in it being a large print viewed from too close a distance.

Direct link | Posted on May 14, 2015 at 12:31 UTC
In reply to:

AlanG: Regardless of their claims, without a gimbal, the video will be unusable. I have a hard time believing they know anything about building, flying or filming with these. These guys are not close to competing with what is already available.

How does 6 rotors let it change direction without tilting? And if so, how fast can it move that way?

Rapid USB charging, what a joke...

After looking at their video, it occurs to me that this could work for someone wanting a very simple easy to use inexpensive system for limited personal aerial capture. Kind of the same philosophy as the AR Drone, but more refined. That's about it.

Direct link | Posted on May 6, 2015 at 19:50 UTC

Regardless of their claims, without a gimbal, the video will be unusable. I have a hard time believing they know anything about building, flying or filming with these. These guys are not close to competing with what is already available.

How does 6 rotors let it change direction without tilting? And if so, how fast can it move that way?

Rapid USB charging, what a joke...

Direct link | Posted on May 6, 2015 at 00:05 UTC as 11th comment | 4 replies
In reply to:

p5freak: One day Leica will introduce a digital M without LCD, and advertise it as back to photography how it once was in the film days. And they will charge 10k for it.

There is a film showing Selgado working and he does a lot of chimping

Direct link | Posted on May 2, 2015 at 14:44 UTC
In reply to:

AlanG: I'm sure this will be a useful tool for some. But b/w film handles bright highlights by increasing density and digital will clip highlight detail (that possibly could be burned in when printing from film.) So it is not the same methodology as shooting negative film.

Additionally by using this camera in place of one with a color sensor, one loses the ability to adjust the brightness of individual colors in post before converting to grayscale. That may have a greater impact on some pictures than some possible technical gains resulting from eliminating the color filter array.

Colored filters over a lens on a monochrome camera do not allow one to adjust for individual colors. Working from a color image, one can even simultaneously brighten or darken complementary colors.

Direct link | Posted on May 1, 2015 at 03:22 UTC

I'm sure this will be a useful tool for some. But b/w film handles bright highlights by increasing density and digital will clip highlight detail (that possibly could be burned in when printing from film.) So it is not the same methodology as shooting negative film.

Additionally by using this camera in place of one with a color sensor, one loses the ability to adjust the brightness of individual colors in post before converting to grayscale. That may have a greater impact on some pictures than some possible technical gains resulting from eliminating the color filter array.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 30, 2015 at 22:15 UTC as 71st comment | 3 replies
On Yongnuo creates near-clone of Canon EF 35mm f/2 article (170 comments in total)
In reply to:

AlanG: The AF in my Canon 16-35mm can't be repaired due to the part being discontinued. So here's hoping that Yongnuo's clone AF parts can fix my lens.

Yes not as good as many prime lenses but with DXO correction it was very useful for me.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 26, 2015 at 19:12 UTC
Total: 365, showing: 1 – 20
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