PIX 2015
AlanG

AlanG

Lives in United States Silver Spring, United States
Works as a Photographer
Has a website at www.goldsteinphoto.com
Joined on Mar 3, 2003

Comments

Total: 390, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

AlanG: I'm sure it's a nice camera but to me it is a stretch to call it medium format. Even 6x4.5 barely seemed to qualify.

Deleted

Direct link | Posted on Aug 27, 2015 at 18:18 UTC
In reply to:

AlanG: I'm sure it's a nice camera but to me it is a stretch to call it medium format. Even 6x4.5 barely seemed to qualify.

@IvanM I had a Phase One scanning back for 4x5 many years ago. I think Betterlight still sells some models... probably left over inventory.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 27, 2015 at 16:57 UTC
In reply to:

AlanG: I'm sure it's a nice camera but to me it is a stretch to call it medium format. Even 6x4.5 barely seemed to qualify.

It is OK. Really it is. Get over it. Don't buy that brand home in that community if you hate the photo of the shopping mall so much.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 27, 2015 at 16:50 UTC
In reply to:

AlanG: I'm sure it's a nice camera but to me it is a stretch to call it medium format. Even 6x4.5 barely seemed to qualify.

You seem stuck. Why would I care what you think of that image? I posted it to show that even technically "bad" images get used by clients in some situations.

I'm trying to explain to you that I have more important things to deal with than care about what you are saying here. Maybe others want to discuss this stuff with you but I don't.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 26, 2015 at 21:23 UTC
In reply to:

AlanG: I'm sure it's a nice camera but to me it is a stretch to call it medium format. Even 6x4.5 barely seemed to qualify.

There is no problem that I see. Some images are technically better than others... SO? We all know that. I am not going to chase my ass in circles on that subject. I do the job the way I see fit and move on.

If somehow I could only do it with this new Leica, I probably will pass on the job unless it pays extra for the camera rental and hassle too... as I am busy enough.

The piece of gear that has made the most difference in my business is my recent purchase of a DJI Inspire 1 and other aerial systems the past few years. Splitting hairs over cameras is less than pointless to me and I think I was able to achieve good quality images quite a long time ago. It is just more convenient today due to smaller cameras and other aspects of digital technology.

See my aerial video sample:
https://youtu.be/drb3zFOs8RQ

Direct link | Posted on Aug 26, 2015 at 19:10 UTC
In reply to:

AlanG: I'm sure it's a nice camera but to me it is a stretch to call it medium format. Even 6x4.5 barely seemed to qualify.

The A7RII is an impressive camera to me even with any lens as it has some unique features. Being able to use Canon TSE lenses on it makes it especially attractive. I would never consider buying the Zeiss lenses you mentioned as they serve no use for me.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 26, 2015 at 18:44 UTC
In reply to:

AlanG: I'm sure it's a nice camera but to me it is a stretch to call it medium format. Even 6x4.5 barely seemed to qualify.

"That jpeg you linked has all sorts of jpeg artifacts. It would only work well as a small web thumbnail image. It's also blurred a bit."

All true except for the thumbnail part... the client IS using it full screen. The link is one of several images from a slideshow for the property.

And I was also paid well. That is what you and others seem to be missing... the client is not selling architecture or photographs and they and the prospective home owners don't care about all of the techie stuff.

They just want to show that a shopping mall is nearby. I was stopped by mall security when I tried to shoot inside this mall with a regular camera. So the client was happy I got this.

I am just pointing out that although the other images I supplied were technically much better, it really didn't matter so much in this particular case.

The web is a major outlet for many of my advertising images although I still shoot hi res so they can be printed large in sales displays and print work.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 26, 2015 at 18:33 UTC
In reply to:

AlanG: I'm sure it's a nice camera but to me it is a stretch to call it medium format. Even 6x4.5 barely seemed to qualify.

"Then there are zero medium format digital bodies."
Exactly.
Today I just think you have to look at all cameras just as picture making devices and see if the quality suits your needs and your client's needs. In the past my clients insisted on 4x5 transparencies. When we started scanning I made a move down to 6x9 CM and 6x12 CM.

Nobody has specified a required format for me to use in years. I have even used my cell phone camera for a job where being inconspicuous was of paramount importance over corner sharpness.

Here is a link to it:
http://www.nvhomes.com/hero/ab441d32-9332-40e0-b55b-41a6fcdba0fc/db/ab441d32-9332-40e0-b55b-41a6fcdba0fc.jpg

Getting the most out of any of these hi-res cameras is tricky regardless of the format. It is hard to say which one will do a "better" job under various situations. (Vibration, focus accuracy, and other factors come into play.)

The A7RII seems more well rounded and useful to me. But others may have different needs and disagree.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 26, 2015 at 18:00 UTC

I'm sure it's a nice camera but to me it is a stretch to call it medium format. Even 6x4.5 barely seemed to qualify.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 26, 2015 at 15:26 UTC as 42nd comment | 16 replies
In reply to:

BigOne: Anything made in China is crap. Including granite tiles.

Yeah China made some bad stone billions of years ago.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 25, 2015 at 23:29 UTC
In reply to:

BigOne: Anything made in China is crap. Including granite tiles.

Yeah China made some bad stone billions of years ago.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 25, 2015 at 23:28 UTC
In reply to:

AlanG: The sensor cover glass in this model is notorious for spontaneously developing cracks. Then it came out that the sensors also suffer from corrosion over time. The tripod mount is attached to the baseplate. The baseplate is not well secured to the body. It turns out that when the camera is on a tripod, the brittle body casting can break where it attaches to the baseplate and the camera can fall.

Leicas had issues where the neck strap lugs came unscrewed due to oversights in manufacturing. Many M8s & M9s have had shutters that failed. The issues on the M8 are numerous. The LCD can develop a "coffee" stain. When the LCD fails, it can't be replaced. I'll stop here.

@Juandabte..."For some problems, we need to have the frequency"

Do some research on your own. Start at the L-camera forum. I think the more recent M240 model has sorted out some of the problems. The rangefinder appeals to some but has not been upgraded in 61 years. So as resolution increases that remains a limitation. The M240 can use an EVF even though it is not nearly as high res as what others have had for years. Leica has had about 4 different EVFs that are incompatible across models.

This is a boutique brand... some owners just have to own a $7200 50mm f2 lens along with an $11000 faster one.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 24, 2015 at 14:00 UTC
In reply to:

AlanG: The sensor cover glass in this model is notorious for spontaneously developing cracks. Then it came out that the sensors also suffer from corrosion over time. The tripod mount is attached to the baseplate. The baseplate is not well secured to the body. It turns out that when the camera is on a tripod, the brittle body casting can break where it attaches to the baseplate and the camera can fall.

Leicas had issues where the neck strap lugs came unscrewed due to oversights in manufacturing. Many M8s & M9s have had shutters that failed. The issues on the M8 are numerous. The LCD can develop a "coffee" stain. When the LCD fails, it can't be replaced. I'll stop here.

Ok, they freeze up and you need to remove the battery to reset. They are sensitive to what memory card is used and exhibit peculiar problems that some attribute to the card. But it could be for other reasons. They develop one or more thin vertical black lines down the image... particularly apparent at high ISOs. When the M8 came out it was users who noticed it was sensitive to IR... necessitating blocking filters. Leica either didn't know or didn't say. Very slow repair times have been reported by many. Users commonly send all bodies and lenses to Germany to get the focusing to work reasonably well. The 60 year old design of the focusing system using mechanical rollers and cams has severe limitations that show up when pixel peeping. But why else would you use $3k, $5k and even more costly lenses?

Direct link | Posted on Aug 22, 2015 at 14:11 UTC

The sensor cover glass in this model is notorious for spontaneously developing cracks. Then it came out that the sensors also suffer from corrosion over time. The tripod mount is attached to the baseplate. The baseplate is not well secured to the body. It turns out that when the camera is on a tripod, the brittle body casting can break where it attaches to the baseplate and the camera can fall.

Leicas had issues where the neck strap lugs came unscrewed due to oversights in manufacturing. Many M8s & M9s have had shutters that failed. The issues on the M8 are numerous. The LCD can develop a "coffee" stain. When the LCD fails, it can't be replaced. I'll stop here.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 21, 2015 at 14:28 UTC as 30th comment | 5 replies

Interesting to see the rangefinder was accurate. But was it accurate before the camera fell?

This is the standard way that rangefinders have always been calibrated in Wetzlar.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 20, 2015 at 13:38 UTC as 45th comment

Finally!

Direct link | Posted on Aug 18, 2015 at 12:43 UTC as 25th comment

Gee. This sounds like something Paul Buff did more than 20 years ago with their first remote control system. And the Buff Cyber Commander has been around for quite a while too. It meters, lets you control each light individually or in groups, and triggers the units.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 13, 2015 at 13:52 UTC as 10th comment | 2 replies
On DJI Phantom 3 Standard photography drone unveiled article (72 comments in total)
In reply to:

Sarge_: I was so hoping this would be a unit with ability to control better cameras, like the Sony RX100 units. As an architectural photographer I've been waiting for an affordable way to get a decent camera in the air, but this is still no improvement on a GoPro rig, or their other proprietary Vision cameras.

If you're reading, Phantom, I need a larger sensor for low light (dusk use) and the ability to zoom between 24mm-70mm equivalent. The camera technology and the flight tech are all there, we just need a real-time interface and controller.

I would think Phantom could sell a lot of these in the $1,500 range. Ideally they'd be software upgradable so you could fit better cameras as they become available.

I won't invest in a drone, which should work for many years, that comes with a camera that is out of date in a year or so, and which doesn't measure up to professional standards on any level.

You can't stop the quad's motors and shoot photos. It will drop like a brick. This new Phantom or the Phantom 3s are the best bang for the buck by far. Wasting countless hours of time looking for cheaper alternatives seems pointless to me. This will fly and shoot great right out of the box. If you keep the ISO low, shoot dngs and process them well, they will be quite good. It is absolutely astounding to me what you can buy now for $800-$1300.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 12, 2015 at 14:52 UTC
On DJI Phantom 3 Standard photography drone unveiled article (72 comments in total)
In reply to:

Sarge_: I was so hoping this would be a unit with ability to control better cameras, like the Sony RX100 units. As an architectural photographer I've been waiting for an affordable way to get a decent camera in the air, but this is still no improvement on a GoPro rig, or their other proprietary Vision cameras.

If you're reading, Phantom, I need a larger sensor for low light (dusk use) and the ability to zoom between 24mm-70mm equivalent. The camera technology and the flight tech are all there, we just need a real-time interface and controller.

I would think Phantom could sell a lot of these in the $1,500 range. Ideally they'd be software upgradable so you could fit better cameras as they become available.

I won't invest in a drone, which should work for many years, that comes with a camera that is out of date in a year or so, and which doesn't measure up to professional standards on any level.

I started with a 450 and still have it. Junk1... it is going to be a lot harder than you may think to consistently get good photos using that. Of course we all have our own definition of good.

This is the standard I'm working at:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=drb3zFOs8RQ

Direct link | Posted on Aug 11, 2015 at 23:37 UTC
On DJI Phantom 3 Standard photography drone unveiled article (72 comments in total)
In reply to:

Sarge_: I was so hoping this would be a unit with ability to control better cameras, like the Sony RX100 units. As an architectural photographer I've been waiting for an affordable way to get a decent camera in the air, but this is still no improvement on a GoPro rig, or their other proprietary Vision cameras.

If you're reading, Phantom, I need a larger sensor for low light (dusk use) and the ability to zoom between 24mm-70mm equivalent. The camera technology and the flight tech are all there, we just need a real-time interface and controller.

I would think Phantom could sell a lot of these in the $1,500 range. Ideally they'd be software upgradable so you could fit better cameras as they become available.

I won't invest in a drone, which should work for many years, that comes with a camera that is out of date in a year or so, and which doesn't measure up to professional standards on any level.

Yes but regarding the Spreadwings S800, S900, S1000, they are primarily intended for video work using the ZenMuse gimbals. You are limited to a specific camera body and quite wide lens with these gimbals I believe. So while the Spreadwings platforms will work, some other kind of gimbal will be needed to use longer lenses. The copter, radio, batteries, gimbal, misc. and camera can easily get well beyond $10,000 depending on choices.

So consider how good a deal this is if you can live with 12MP DNG stills.

I am using a Sony A5000 with 16-50 power zoom and can change the focal length remotely while flying. It is on a Tarot quad with a simple servo platform. My entire system including Futaba radio is about $3,000. But It also took a while to build, program, test and tune.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 11, 2015 at 19:52 UTC
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