Chris Cookson

Joined on Aug 27, 2006

Comments

Total: 6, showing: 1 – 6
On article Picasa will be phased out in favor of Google Photos (156 comments in total)
In reply to:

ObiDonQuixote: I've been using Picasa Desktop for many years, and also started using Google Photos when it was released. It seemed like the start of a great service, but is clearly missing many critical features.

That said, the one feature that has kept me loyal to picasa desktop for so many years is the ability to add/edit location data (geotags) to my images. To date, I have yet to find any software that will offers this feature is a simple/easy-to-use way. Whether they plan to in the future or not (doubtful) Google Photos clearly doesn't offer the feature either.

Does anyone know of a decent deskop application that allows geotagging? Would appreciate any suggestions.

Lightroom isn't free, but it does allow geotagging, and in some respects is better than Picasa, as if you have a bunch of photos taken in a similar location, you display the map, then drag the thumbnails from the list onto the map. You can tag a bunch of photos really quickly that way.
If you don't like the idea of paying for a subscription, Paint Shop Pro has a similar geotagging feature, once again allowing you to geotag a bunch of images at once and it's quite cheap.

Link | Posted on Feb 16, 2016 at 20:31 UTC
On article Picasa will be phased out in favor of Google Photos (156 comments in total)

The one thing Google does really well - search, they've decided you no longer need to be able to do with images on your computer, but instead you should upload them all to the cloud first.
Did Google actually consider that some people might not want or be able to upload their entire image collection to the cloud, and that they might like a good desktop search and organising tool to help them locate the images they do want to put in the cloud?

Link | Posted on Feb 16, 2016 at 02:15 UTC as 43rd comment
On article Picasa will be phased out in favor of Google Photos (156 comments in total)
In reply to:

Daniel Lauring: This seem akin to Apple killing Aperture for the Photos app. They aren't interested in software for professionals or even enthusiasts. They make software for Instagramers and FB posters.

This leaves the market wide open to companies like Adobe and their Photoshop Elements.

Corel offers a reasonably priced deal with Paint Shop Pro, and it's a perpetual license vs subscription for Adobe's CC.
To put it kindly, Paint Shop Pro has poor RAW editing capabilities, but compared to Picasa, it's still a step up, and unlike Elements which is crippled with limited 16 bit support, PSP fully supports 16 bit for most operations. It's no Photoshop, but it's fairly cheap, does everything Picasa can do and more.
I have Picasa, Elements, PSP and Adobe CC acquired in that order.
The thing I really like about Picasa ,which beats all the others, is the ability to locate images anywhere on your computer even if you can't remember where you've put them.
Being free, I've frequently recommended it to clients with no image editing software as a safe and easy way to find and email me images or to export and put on their web sites if they maintain their sites themselves.
Google Photos is no use for this, and much as I like Lightroom, it's not something I'd recommend to a novice.

Link | Posted on Feb 16, 2016 at 00:33 UTC
On article 10 Photo Editing Programs (that aren't Photoshop) (352 comments in total)

I guess the article was trying to stick to exactly 10 for a nice round number and not feature too many products from the same vendor, but hey there are two Adobe products listed, so why not make it a dozen, and add a couple more from Corel which has always seemed a bit like the 'poor folks Adobe'.

Corel After Shot Pro offers similar features to Lightroom at a cheaper price, and Corel Draw Graphics Suite X6 probably comes closest to Adobe suite with Corel Photo Paint as its imaging editing component with support for phootoshop plugins, but also with a decent vector graphics and page layout component, 16 bit and CMYK support. It's not super cheap, but it's cheaper than Adobe and offers both subscription and perpetual licenses.

Link | Posted on May 17, 2013 at 22:01 UTC as 178th comment
On article Fujifilm releases X-S1 premium EXR 26X superzoom (383 comments in total)
In reply to:

olakiril2: 920g for a 2/3"!
Ok with a lens but still..

Apart from the larger zoom range, and the HD video, I'm not sure what this will do that the S200EXR doesn't. The S200EXR is a fairly heavy camera too, and was realtively expensive. The sample images suggest the same EXR blurring as the S200, especially with green foliage. I'd like to see how this handles in high ISO with the CMOS sensor, as that could perform differently to the CCD in the S200EXR, but so far I can't see any reason to rush to 'upgrade', although this probably is a more realistic successor to the S200EXR than the HS10 and 20.

Link | Posted on Nov 24, 2011 at 10:32 UTC

Hopefully this will overcome some of the limitations of the S200EXR. In EXR modes the DR or noise are excellent depending on which EXR mode is selected, but fine detail is blurred even in 12MP mode.
The HS10 and HS20 extended the zoom but went to a smaller sensor than the S200EXR, so I've been thinking of going to DSLR.
The X-S1 might tempt me to stick with Fuji, but it will need to be priced right, and offer a significant improvement in IQ over the S200EXR in all modes.
When I bought the S200EXR it wasn't a great deal cheaper than an entry level DSLR, and it starts to get a bit shaky at full zoom without a tripod or higher ISO although it's not a 'super zoom'.
I occasionally make some quite large prints, so it's a shame the X-S1 sensor is only effectively 6MP in EXR mode. Put the 16/8MPixels EXR of the HS20 on a large sensor, with a reasonable zoom, and you've just about got my ideal all-in-one.

Link | Posted on Oct 10, 2011 at 09:32 UTC as 11th comment
Total: 6, showing: 1 – 6