chlamchowder

chlamchowder

Lives in United States MD, United States
Works as a Student
Joined on Aug 28, 2010

Comments

Total: 230, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

D1N0: With aps-c moving to 24mp and even 28, 16 is just not going to cut it anymore. Eventually m43 will be a niche for street photographers who don't crop.

If someone's shooting a D4s or 1D X, there's a fair chance they're willing to put down the money (aka not their money) for a very long telephoto.

Also, the need for higher resolution might go down as fewer people print and more view pictures onscreen. But then screen resolutions are increasing. Right now a 4K screen is somewhat affordable, and has about 8 MP. It'd be interesting to see what the future holds.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 24, 2015 at 13:24 UTC
In reply to:

D1N0: With aps-c moving to 24mp and even 28, 16 is just not going to cut it anymore. Eventually m43 will be a niche for street photographers who don't crop.

Depends on what you're doing. If you're not cropping or printing large, 16 MP can be enough.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 23, 2015 at 17:56 UTC
On Making 'Art': We go inside Sigma's lens factory article (190 comments in total)
In reply to:

chlamchowder: Looks like they're on Windows 7, with quad core CPUs (or 2-core CPUs with hyper-threading). And it looks like their CAD software is only loading two threads.

Also, standing desks...

Well, I said "that doesn't make porting code between Mac and Linux any easier". Looks like we agree.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 10, 2015 at 09:03 UTC
On Making 'Art': We go inside Sigma's lens factory article (190 comments in total)
In reply to:

chlamchowder: Looks like they're on Windows 7, with quad core CPUs (or 2-core CPUs with hyper-threading). And it looks like their CAD software is only loading two threads.

Also, standing desks...

It could be argued either way. I'm sure there's some engineering software that runs on OS X, and some that don't (i.e. Autodesk Inventor). But the ability to dual boot a modern Mac makes that debate moot anyways.

Macs are Linux-y - probably refers to Linux/Mac OS sharing a common ancestor (http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/50/Unix_history-simple.png). Windows IIRC is on a separate line. That doesn't make porting code between Mac and Linux easier though.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 10, 2015 at 01:38 UTC
On Making 'Art': We go inside Sigma's lens factory article (190 comments in total)
In reply to:

chlamchowder: Looks like they're on Windows 7, with quad core CPUs (or 2-core CPUs with hyper-threading). And it looks like their CAD software is only loading two threads.

Also, standing desks...

How did an observation about their computer setups turn into a Linux vs Mac vs Windows debate? Also, if we're going to have that debate, don't call anyone a fanboy or troll.

They probably have that setup because:
-their software is written for windows
-it's cheaper to get to a certain performance point when you can choose from more hardware manufacturers (with Mac your choices are limited)

I doubt there's more to it.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 10, 2015 at 00:03 UTC
On Making 'Art': We go inside Sigma's lens factory article (190 comments in total)

Looks like they're on Windows 7, with quad core CPUs (or 2-core CPUs with hyper-threading). And it looks like their CAD software is only loading two threads.

Also, standing desks...

Direct link | Posted on Mar 9, 2015 at 19:17 UTC as 44th comment | 11 replies
In reply to:

Tom Nokin: The importance of this release will be decided by the correctness of Tamrons first point in their press release. If it is on par or close to the quality of Nikon 14-24 it will be a bestseller.

I suppose an important question would be how much of a difference 14mm makes (vs 15mm).

Direct link | Posted on Jan 26, 2015 at 18:48 UTC
In reply to:

chlamchowder: At least batteries with poor contact are more manageable than ones that like to explode.

All I have to say is wow. It's incredible you didn't realize:
1. That comment was sarcastic
2. 'Better than a miniature bomb' is a low standard
3. Manageable =/= something you want to deal with
4. I'm not condoning defective gear (see #2, 3)
5. I'm not defending Canon (see #2, 3, 4)

Here's a revised comment for those without a sense of humor:
"This situation is better than one in which a battery explodes and damages the camera and/or user. That said, it's a problem and I'm glad Canon's fixing it."

btw I shoot Nikon, so no pro-Canon bias here.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 20, 2015 at 14:20 UTC

At least batteries with poor contact are more manageable than ones that like to explode.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 16, 2015 at 21:56 UTC as 11th comment | 2 replies
On Tamron 16-300mm Di II VC PZD real-world samples article (103 comments in total)
In reply to:

photofan1986: Don't see the point: that's p&s quality. You'd be better off with a good bridge camera.

Though I still wouldn't buy this personally (just because I'm picky about image quality), I agree that there's a justification for it. The convenience of having everything from wideangle to long telephoto in one zoom lens can help "get the shot".

For example, if a bird is coming at you from long range, and then lands a meter away, you can smoothly zoom out and keep shooting. With a 300/2.8, or even a 70-200/2.8, you would have to run back to keep within minimum focus distance. You could run a dual camera setup, but even then there's more transition delay in switching cameras than zooming out more.

As for pros, if a 24-450mm f/2.8 existed that was sharp wide open, they'd be all over it. Sadly that lens doesn't exist.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 10, 2014 at 07:11 UTC
On Tamron 16-300mm Di II VC PZD real-world samples article (103 comments in total)
In reply to:

photofan1986: Don't see the point: that's p&s quality. You'd be better off with a good bridge camera.

I wouldn't call it P&S quality, but it definitely isn't what I'd want from a $600 lens.

I suppose my expectations are just too high, and it's probably acceptable to a lot of people who want the massive zoom range in a compact setup.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 8, 2014 at 20:25 UTC
In reply to:

vladimir vanek: Someone should stop google from their spy activities. It's/will be really dangerous that a private company has so much data in possession... And excavates more everaday from your emails, searches, tracking, calling etc.

Ok, point taken (about Prism and other NSA projects). But at least consumer feedback and market forces have some effect on big companies. Google and Apple are moving to default encryption on phones. Microsoft fought back in a case where the government tried to get access to emails. All that happened because of customer privacy concerns.

I'm still concerned about companies like Google, but I'm more concerned about the NSA, which pretty much can't be held accountable for anything.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 21, 2014 at 20:17 UTC
In reply to:

vladimir vanek: Someone should stop google from their spy activities. It's/will be really dangerous that a private company has so much data in possession... And excavates more everaday from your emails, searches, tracking, calling etc.

That's how they make money - by using that data for targeted advertising. You give up some privacy, and in return get nice things like free storage space (drive) and so on.

It's scary, but I'm more concerned about governments than Google or other tech companies. If your views are too far away from the ruling party's ideology, Google/MS/Apple/Amazon won't care and probably never will. Governments on the other hand.....(at least the US isn't there, yet.)

Direct link | Posted on Nov 20, 2014 at 18:38 UTC
In reply to:

Scales USA: Google also has facial recognition, so it can name the persons in a photo, and even inform the FBI if a wanted person is found.

The potential, as noted sounds both wonderful, and also frightening. Snapping a candid photo of a person and having them named? Its possible now for millions of people, but so far, Google is holding back due to potential privacy issues. (big $$$$$$$$$ lawsuits)

IMO an even bigger worry is that all our children will grow up in a surveillance state.

That said, this development is impressive (if used properly, to help visually impaired people). Kudos to those working on it.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 20, 2014 at 18:33 UTC
In reply to:

Gollan: I like OneDrive, and this should be good news, but their client for Mac OS has been extremely unreliable since it was released. For those of us who work in mixed environments, this is a show-stopper.

Using a browser isn't as convenient as a native client. On Windows, OneDrive stuff will automatically sync. You can open/edit files as if they were only local, and a background sync engine will keep everything in sync (both ways).

If you only have a browser, you'd have to download/upload files manually to keep things in sync. Not a big deal IMO, but some others might think differently.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 28, 2014 at 20:20 UTC
On Google announces Nexus 9 8.9-inch tablet post (40 comments in total)

Not sure we (photographers) are the target market for this?
People who just browse the web, check email, and occasionally edit a few documents won't mind having less storage and no micro-sd slot.

On the other hand, the only attractive feature I see is the display resolution. Every other spec is kind of mediocre.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 17, 2014 at 01:30 UTC as 13th comment | 1 reply
On Photoshop comes to Chrome OS in limited beta article (97 comments in total)
In reply to:

Pete Perry: This is a great idea and it isn't like VMWare, it is more like Citrix.

The only issue will be if Adobe fails to keep up with their server farms as then things with get slow.

As for using it on Linux, I would do it! This would mean that users of Linux and Chrome can now have MS Office and Adobe CS so, you're no longer tied to either one of the two mainstream operating systems.

Oh and, until Photoshop gets open CL support, there's no reason this won't run as fast as a MacBook Pro... even with Open CL support, the MacBooks use crappy Intel processors so, there would be less of a benefit than using a higher end graphics card.

I think we're still fuzzy on what's going on. Are you sending inputs to Adobe, which then does all the processing in the cloud? Or is the photoshop app doing the processing locally, but is just limited to saving in the cloud?

Their comment about OpenCL suggests that it's running locally, and could take advantage of graphics hardware later (if it were running remotely, it'd have no way of accessing graphics cards, unless they're talking about a server farm with graphics cards).

On the other hand, "streaming" suggests something more like remote desktop/citrix. If that's the case, you better have a really good internet connection...

Direct link | Posted on Oct 12, 2014 at 22:58 UTC
On Photoshop comes to Chrome OS in limited beta article (97 comments in total)
In reply to:

AbrasiveReducer: Assuming the appeal of Chromebooks is the low price, when they figure a way to make Photoshop work on a $400 Chromebook as well as it works on a MacBook, they'll have something.

Pete - source? It seems like it saves to the cloud, but runs image processing code locally. What you say seems to contradict what's on Adobe's site, which mentions PS running within Chrome's app sandbox. (And by virtualization, I mean something like Java's JVM, Microsoft's .NET platform, or Android apps, where the program's code sits above a translation layer).

Also, you don't quite make sense - if the app is completely running on remote server farms, Adobe would not be tweaking the level of performance you get from your machine (because it's not even running on your machine). Every machine would give the same performance, dependent on internet connection latency, of course.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 12, 2014 at 22:52 UTC
On Photoshop comes to Chrome OS in limited beta article (97 comments in total)
In reply to:

Wye Photography: Perhaps Adobe is trialing a full cloud solution before moving it to Windows and Mac.

Oh please no. Internet service (especially good internet service) can't always be expected when traveling.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 2, 2014 at 04:26 UTC
On Photoshop comes to Chrome OS in limited beta article (97 comments in total)
In reply to:

fotobert: more and more reasons to go for Linux, Raw Therapee and GIMP.

Except you like to see your nude selfies somewhere in the internet.

Just my thoughts
Albert

Not always, when you're working off a laptop and have limited hard drive space. I've started deleting raws after conversion, and that results in a lot of 'orphaned' entries in LR's database.
Lightroom doesn't just force you to copy pictures off the card, it forces you to add pictures to its catalog.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 2, 2014 at 04:22 UTC
Total: 230, showing: 1 – 20
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