jtan163

jtan163

Lives in Australia Adelaide, Australia
Joined on Oct 25, 2010
About me:

Just another guy with a camera.

Comments

Total: 599, showing: 1 – 20
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On Nikon D7200 First Impressions Review preview (585 comments in total)
In reply to:

Photoexposition: So, this is how Nikon plans to fight the 38,1% drop in DSLR sales since 2012 ?
Not to mention D7100 owners who will sadly face the value-drop of their camera on the second hand market. Excellent way to upset their customers, way to go.
When men can't change things, they change the name. D7100->D7200.
NFC ? Well, that's marketing BS that applies to compact cameras or smartphones, not a serious digital SLR camera. The years when Nikon was a pioneer and a real innovater have vanished (Nikon F, F4, D300, D700)
You wanted a tilt-screen ? Doesn't take a rocket-scientist to forecast a D7300 in 2 years with this improvement. We are passionate photographers, not milk cows.

@moinarcs - true that.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 2, 2015 at 13:23 UTC
On Nikon D7200 First Impressions Review preview (585 comments in total)
In reply to:

Photoexposition: So, this is how Nikon plans to fight the 38,1% drop in DSLR sales since 2012 ?
Not to mention D7100 owners who will sadly face the value-drop of their camera on the second hand market. Excellent way to upset their customers, way to go.
When men can't change things, they change the name. D7100->D7200.
NFC ? Well, that's marketing BS that applies to compact cameras or smartphones, not a serious digital SLR camera. The years when Nikon was a pioneer and a real innovater have vanished (Nikon F, F4, D300, D700)
You wanted a tilt-screen ? Doesn't take a rocket-scientist to forecast a D7300 in 2 years with this improvement. We are passionate photographers, not milk cows.

Some of the incremental improvements that Oly and Sony made are incremental, but they are big increments.
IBIS and the A7 (especially the S) being two that leap to mind.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 2, 2015 at 12:04 UTC
On Nikon D7200 First Impressions Review preview (585 comments in total)
In reply to:

Der Steppenwolf: So Nikon, for EVERY little improvement you have to buy new camera. Memory and processor in D7100 could have handled same buffer if not more but no. First they sell hat one, then they add tiny bit more memory and the game goes on. And memory IS DIRT CHEAP and has been for MANY YEARS now.And before flameing starts, I happen to know for a fact that this is true since I am one of the contributors to Nikon hacker community (google it), where we actually are dissasembling these cameras and their software to improve upon lowly features Nikon is putting there to begin with.
No shame what so ever in that company.

I'd hold my judgement on the buffer at the moment.
The press release says:

"With an extended buffer capacity, the number of shots recordable during continuous shooting is increased to a magnificent 100 shots in large image size, JPEG fine-format, 18 shots in RAW, 14-bit lossless compressed, and 27 shots in RAW, 12-bit lossless compressed. Furthermore, unlimited number of images can be captured continuously, as long as battery and memory card capacity permit, when using the CH or CL release mode with a shutter speed slower than 4 seconds. "

On the D750 with a fast card you can get about 3 fps continuous until it hits a 200 shot limit.
Apparently the D7200 does not suffer from the 200 shot limitation, and the press release mentions CH as well as CL.

A large buffer is not overly important if the camera has the write speed to clear the buffer as fast as it fills.
Then presumably the buffer is only used a temp storage for the image processing.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 2, 2015 at 10:34 UTC
On Lytro sheds jobs as it shifts focus to video article (422 comments in total)
In reply to:

bogdescu: Might it have dawned on them that merely postponing a decision (where to focus and what f-stop to choose) is not actually something desirable?

@Henrik - A wider aperture would allow you to gather more light. If you could then refocus that light at will you could use less cameras to cover more area with less artificial light.
3m-~ is probably not going to be an aperture which lends itself to to low light.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 1, 2015 at 10:07 UTC
In reply to:

Mike Sandman: It's very refreshing to read so many un-hedged, direct statements from a camera company executive. Thanks, dPreview, for asking the questions, and thanks Fuji, for answering them forthrightly. Mr. Iida even acknowledged Samsung. This kind of thinking is responsible for Fuji's successful transition from film to digital vs. Kodak's failure.

It would be very nice (and quite a surprise) to see an equally frank set of answers from Nikon or Canon about how their cameras stack up against the competitors.

@Rishi - next time you speak to a Nikon exec who wants to get input from an enthusiast/amateur photographer, please feel free to refer him to me. I assume you can access my contact details from my profile.

As an alternative, how about a reader's Q&A with Nikon executive?
And even a Canon exec, for those that way inclined (not that there I anything wrong with that).

Direct link | Posted on Mar 1, 2015 at 10:03 UTC
In reply to:

Mike Sandman: It's very refreshing to read so many un-hedged, direct statements from a camera company executive. Thanks, dPreview, for asking the questions, and thanks Fuji, for answering them forthrightly. Mr. Iida even acknowledged Samsung. This kind of thinking is responsible for Fuji's successful transition from film to digital vs. Kodak's failure.

It would be very nice (and quite a surprise) to see an equally frank set of answers from Nikon or Canon about how their cameras stack up against the competitors.

Indeed. I wish Nikon were capable or roadmaps, unambiguous statements and even *gasp* talking to customers.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 28, 2015 at 14:56 UTC
In reply to:

jtan163: What would an IR cut filter be used for?
I was under the impresion most digital sensors had one on board (with some exceptions, Leica M8?).
Would these be used to allow the specialist astro cameras (e.g. D810a and the Canon whtaever it is a) to be used in more normal photography?

Thanks npires and photonius. I'd noticed the magenta cast and assumed it was just because I was using relatively low quality Cokin NDs. Perhaps there's more at work then.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 28, 2015 at 07:43 UTC

Wrong reply button - post deleted.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 27, 2015 at 09:23 UTC as 4th comment
In reply to:

jtan163: Carbon fibre body?
Wireless?
Hmm, well according to about 50% of the Nikon FX forum it must be an amateur model.
Pro cameras are made of magnesium alloy and wireless is just an affection for amateurs and soccer parents...
I'm just saying.

christiangrunercom - I know I didn't put an explicit smiley in, but I did make the "according to about 50% of the Nikon FX forum" reference which I thought at least implied that I was taking the micky out of (poking fun at) those kinds of comments made by those people.

The 6-7 replies before yours got it - apologies you didn't.
Just to spell in out I was parodying people who have very firm ideas about what makes a pro still camera and then assume that it translates to every other kind of camera. You clearly have no clue about this segment, and/or parody. I think you should not comment on either. That was more parody by the way. :-) <---note explicit smiley.

BTW I don't think I mentioned EVFs, or bit depths. but I get it HDMI, SGI, 4:2:0 4:2:2 , focus puling, wireless, wired (works remotely on a crane), and manual - not a video pro, but I get it.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 27, 2015 at 09:19 UTC
On Lytro sheds jobs as it shifts focus to video article (422 comments in total)
In reply to:

bogdescu: Might it have dawned on them that merely postponing a decision (where to focus and what f-stop to choose) is not actually something desirable?

Actually it's probably really desirable in some applications.
E.g. surveillance cameras for low light venues, if you can have a wide aperture for the low light and change the focus you don't need as many cameras.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 27, 2015 at 07:39 UTC
On Lytro sheds jobs as it shifts focus to video article (422 comments in total)

The big problem with Lytro is I don't want to have to rely on their web software.
It's a far worse cloud lock in that Adobe CC.

And they Lytro don't appear to understand the photography market.
I mean what photographer wants a one button camera?

One button cameras are for people who use phones, and most of them don't understand focus - most people I know who shoot with phones don't tap to focus and therefore shoot blurry pics, unless their subject happens to be in the default depth of field.

In other words Lytros has been bit by the same "phone users don't care if their images are rubbish" bug as the rest of the industry.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 27, 2015 at 07:37 UTC as 31st comment | 16 replies

What would an IR cut filter be used for?
I was under the impresion most digital sensors had one on board (with some exceptions, Leica M8?).
Would these be used to allow the specialist astro cameras (e.g. D810a and the Canon whtaever it is a) to be used in more normal photography?

Direct link | Posted on Feb 27, 2015 at 07:31 UTC as 7th comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

duckling: A bit of conspiracy theory:
The 42.5/1.7 was obviously designed to kill the Olympus 45/1.8, one of the few M4/3 classics. Perhaps a revenge for Oly's 40-150/2.8 which buried Pana's 150/2.8 project.

The Oly 45mm does indeed rock.
And I have to admit as soon as I saw the spec and price I thought the panny 42.5 1.7 was likely intended as a competitor or at least equivalent for IBIS-less bodies.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 24, 2015 at 11:55 UTC
In reply to:

badi: "We don't normally write about thirty-thousand-dollar cinema camera" ... well actually you do :) ... and probably you should do it more often.

I think most of the "tech readers" also enjoy an article about what the top of the top cameras can do and new tech and so on. I know i do much more than the articles about "yet another guy uses a drone to shoot some glacier". After all it's not a review, just an article about stuff that happens in the industry.

C'mon nikkornikon you can do better than that, the D810 review and the Pentax whatever review are also conspicuously absent...
*tongue firmly in cheek*

Direct link | Posted on Feb 24, 2015 at 11:45 UTC

Carbon fibre body?
Wireless?
Hmm, well according to about 50% of the Nikon FX forum it must be an amateur model.
Pro cameras are made of magnesium alloy and wireless is just an affection for amateurs and soccer parents...
I'm just saying.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 24, 2015 at 11:42 UTC as 20th comment | 7 replies
On Adobe celebrates 25 years of Photoshop article (356 comments in total)
In reply to:

JDThomas: I can't wait to see what new ways they come up with to fleece their consumers in the next 25 years.

I'm thinking that not only with they only 'rent' you the software, but they'll have an additional price for every tool. You want content aware fill? $5/mth extra. How about that pen tool? $3/mth. The paint brush? Well that's gonna cost an extra $10/mth.

25 years is a long time. In 20 years I've seen the several cycles of IT from centralised servers/apps, to decentralised and back...,from in house to outsourcing and back... .
A lot can happen in 25 years and until strong crypto is widely used and trusted, I'm not 100% confident that everything will be on the cloud, or that it should be.

Advances is computation and storage along with security/privacy concerns could just as easily see us move back toward decentralised local data. E.g. much denser and more reliable storage in conjunction with more abundant bandwidth might make the cloud less attractive.

The cloud is attractive now because you don't have to think. But what if you could get the same benefits but keep 3 copies of your data on appliances at 3 remote locations of your choice (e.g. friends and family's houses) as well as on your device? Cloud storage is less compelling then.
Compute is different but similar. The cloud is today, not *necessarily* tomorrow.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 20, 2015 at 01:24 UTC
On Adobe celebrates 25 years of Photoshop article (356 comments in total)
In reply to:

Luke Kaven: Photoshop is one of the worst-designed software applications in history. This is my favorite case study in bad applications design. Every conceivable rule is violated. And then there is Flash.

@BadScience - some OS's have coding and human interface guidelines. Photoshop used to break many of the Apple ones.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 19, 2015 at 17:48 UTC
On Adobe celebrates 25 years of Photoshop article (356 comments in total)
In reply to:

JDThomas: I can't wait to see what new ways they come up with to fleece their consumers in the next 25 years.

I'm thinking that not only with they only 'rent' you the software, but they'll have an additional price for every tool. You want content aware fill? $5/mth extra. How about that pen tool? $3/mth. The paint brush? Well that's gonna cost an extra $10/mth.

Certainly for us down here in AU, $1200 is less than (or about the same) a one off shrinkwrap buy used to be, from memory, let alone upgrades. I recall when I first bought a license in PS3.0 days PS was about $900 and QuarkXPress was about $1600 or $1800. That was real money then, you could still buy a house for about $75K and a decent 68030 Mac to run them on was about $7K, with around $1500 for a scanner and maybe $2.K for a B&W 300-600dpi laser printer.
Of course 300spi in those days was considered adequate for proofs, not final artwork and final art was run out to film/bromides. I'm old.

Still I prefer the model where at the end of your working life you get to keep the software so you can keep using it when you stop working and you get the option of just stopping at a given version, should you choose to do so.
The lack of choice really grinds on me.
I can see how it is attractive for people in business though. Need CC for a project, just pay for a month or 2 and bill the client.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 19, 2015 at 09:29 UTC
On Adobe celebrates 25 years of Photoshop article (356 comments in total)
In reply to:

Luke Kaven: Photoshop is one of the worst-designed software applications in history. This is my favorite case study in bad applications design. Every conceivable rule is violated. And then there is Flash.

I blame the windows cry babies who weren't willing to spend half a years salary on a Mac, back in the day. Ever since it went dual platform it's been compromised. PS 2.0 the pinnacle of PS. And it had that cool eye icon.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 19, 2015 at 06:53 UTC
On Adobe celebrates 25 years of Photoshop article (356 comments in total)
In reply to:

JDThomas: I can't wait to see what new ways they come up with to fleece their consumers in the next 25 years.

I'm thinking that not only with they only 'rent' you the software, but they'll have an additional price for every tool. You want content aware fill? $5/mth extra. How about that pen tool? $3/mth. The paint brush? Well that's gonna cost an extra $10/mth.

Pls don't give them ideas.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 19, 2015 at 06:51 UTC
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