MikeFairbanks

Joined on Oct 1, 2012

Comments

Total: 242, showing: 1 – 20
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On article Friendly Rebel: Canon EOS Rebel T6 / 1300D samples (81 comments in total)

I don't understand how this camera is any different than the last few entry level models.

Link | Posted on May 3, 2016 at 03:10 UTC as 4th comment | 1 reply
On article Friendly Rebel: Canon EOS Rebel T6 / 1300D samples (81 comments in total)
In reply to:

villagranvicent: Put some nice primes on this camera and I bet nobody will be able to see the difference in IQ vs a 7Dmii or 80D or any other APS camera.

No 4K, no 25fps, no 500 af points. for $499 who cares?

Can the Panasonic handle low light as well? If so, then you're right.

Link | Posted on May 3, 2016 at 01:01 UTC
On article 2016 Roundup: Compact Enthusiast Zoom Cameras (225 comments in total)

Don't leave them in the rain. I did today (G9x). Darn it!

Link | Posted on May 2, 2016 at 02:59 UTC as 11th comment

Another thought: Apple and the Android makers could really take over if they decided to go ahead and thicken up their phones and then stuff more technology into them. I could be completely off (I'm not trained in marketing), but it seems that the technology is available to put a one-inch type sensor into a phone with a moderate zoom lens and still have all the phone features. The phone would be thicker, but not any bigger per say.

They could be manufactured and marketed as a premium product. For example, the iPhone 7p (for photo). It's a couple hundred more, but functions just like a Sony Rx100 series while still enabling texting, calling, and all the other apps we use on our phones.

I'm not sure why every phone has to get thinner and thinner. Why not make them thicker and add functions? That's my opinion.

Link | Posted on May 1, 2016 at 21:20 UTC as 3rd comment

My opinion is that they should promote the M-series a lot more than they are, and say in advertising that it can take any Canon lens made. Then, include the adapter in every M sold so that customers can enjoy a small mirrorless camera with all their lenses. The M-series is really good, but it just doesn't get promoted for some reason. Even DP Review hasn't reviewed a single one of the four models. It would also help to include more M-primes than the (one?) they have. I know people like zooms, but zooms take up a lot of space.

Imagine if they sold an M-series camera with three small primes in the package. I'd love something like that. Maybe a 20mm, a 35mm, and a 50mm, and make them as small as possible. Include a leather case that could hold the body and three lenses. Everything in one little kit.

I think it would sell, especially if advertised frequently.

Link | Posted on May 1, 2016 at 21:12 UTC as 4th comment
On article 2016 Roundup: Compact Enthusiast Zoom Cameras (225 comments in total)

I bought the Canon G9X on Thursday (today is Sunday) and have taken about 500 photos. This thing is a winner. It's the cheapest of the bunch (unless you count the old Sony RX100, original version).

The reason I chose the G9X, despite its smaller set of features and functions, is that I already have a good DSLR (Canon 6D) and a few lenses for when I want quality photos or for when doing the occasional paid portrait session. So it seemed to me that what I really wanted was a very small camera that could exceed my iPhone 6s Plus.

Things I like about it:

* It can fit in any pocket, including a shirt pocket. It's smaller than you think.

* Fixed screen: I prefer it to be fixed so it doesn't move, break, or add to the thickness.

* Touch screen. Wow, it really makes getting through menus and choosing focus point a quick job.

* It actually can handle lower light than I thought it would. It's a capable camera.

* It was cheap for what it is.

* Smaller than a phone. Wow.

Link | Posted on May 1, 2016 at 20:58 UTC as 13th comment
On Connect post Sony patents contact lens camera with blink-triggered shutter (62 comments in total)

Isn't there something in between this idea and Google Glass?

I personally would love a pair of glasses that coul take photos or video, but not be identifiable as such. I understand the worry, however, as many people would abuse the technology. Personally, I would take the glasses off in sensitive areas (restrooms, poolside, etc.). I would like it for the convenience.

But how long before someone ruins it for everyone else? Not long.

Google Glass' problem was that it looked like it was built in someone's garage with a big box attached to one side of a pair of glasses. It looked like, well, a computer was stuck to a pair of glasses. Would have been better to have the glasses wireless and the computer in the pocket.

The privacy concerns are legitimate, however, which is probably why Google Glass looked so obvious. Thet weren't intending for them to be inconspicuous.

Link | Posted on May 1, 2016 at 20:48 UTC as 10th comment
In reply to:

JackM: Wow. I didn't even know acid throwing was a thing. I hate uncivilized people.

Hypocrisy isn't limited to western civilization. It's a human problem. Take a look at the so-called communist countries. They abandoned communism one by one, but want to save face by continuing the branding. If China is a communist country, then the Great Wall was built in a couple weeks. Neither story holds up. China is capitalist, but claims communism, so that's a healthy dose of hypocrisy right there.

Then there's the Middle East that follows a prophet who treated his wife as his equal, but whose followers rarely do.

But western civilization is the same way, true.

And as far as evolving: culture is not the same as species. The humans in one part of the world are not more evolved than others. We are all the same species, and on a global/universal level, the actions of any human is a reflection on the species. Our species needs a real step in evolution so that we're not self-destructive. Or perhaps that is what was intended. In that case, carry on.

Link | Posted on May 1, 2016 at 18:31 UTC
In reply to:

JackM: Wow. I didn't even know acid throwing was a thing. I hate uncivilized people.

It's common (the acid throwing and other horrific acts) in some cultures, especially cultures in which people are supposed to stay within a certain class (or caste in some cases).

Plus, even in the developed world there are atrocities we commit that are just as brutal, but don't seem like it because we do it using buttons and switches instead of face-to-face.

About human cruelty and the earlier question of "What century is this?"

It doesn't matter what century this is. We aren't a different species than those who walked the planet 200 or 2,000 years ago. We are no different. We just think we are because we made machines and because we can communicate more efficiently (though not necessarily more effectively).

It will take another step in evolution before we see a significant change in human behavior, and that might not happen for a long, long time.

Only through a step in evolution can we hope to have world peace, and who knows if there's enough time for that.

Link | Posted on Apr 26, 2016 at 18:27 UTC
In reply to:

villagranvicent: Why "photojournalism" has to be depressing and show people at their worst? cannot be something happy just for a change.

Everyday I have plenty of opportunities of taking shots of kids begging for money on the streets. I need to grab my 35mm f1.4 to get that watery eye shot with shallow depth of field through my window. I hope it rains to add more to the depressing atmosphere, if not I can always added later in PS.

But there's your answer, Zdman. People buy calendars with photos of puppies, flowers, the grand canyon, smiling grandmothers on the front porch, etc. Norman Rockwell in photo form.

It's a different market.

It's like me asking why race cars are have all those stickers and flashy colors when nobody would buy that. They want solid, clean-looking cars.

It's just a different market. A happy kid splashing in a pool isn't news. We see it all the time. But human suffering is not as common (for most of us). The lady with acid thrown in her face is depressing, but is important because it tells a story and can possibly lead to a positive change.

A dog jumping for a Frisbee is nice, but what story does it tell?

Link | Posted on Apr 26, 2016 at 18:07 UTC

Were these all shot with Sony equipment? Regardless, what gear did they use?

Link | Posted on Apr 26, 2016 at 02:41 UTC as 15th comment | 1 reply
On article Look Sharp: Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX85/GX80 video preview (130 comments in total)

That was a great video review. Short and sweet. It's definitely appealing.

What is the physical size of the next zoom lens that people might purchase? It comes with the 12-32 (which is equivalent to 24-64 on a full frame--very useful range). So is the next zoom something that starts at around 32-100? And is that lens small? Might be a really cool travel setup.

Link | Posted on Apr 20, 2016 at 00:14 UTC as 1st comment | 1 reply

Wireless is better as it can update frequently. Either get a camera with wifi capability or buy and eyefye card, etc. to transfer wirelessly to ipad or iphone.

All of this is pretty much jpeg only, but there are exceptions.

Link | Posted on Apr 19, 2016 at 23:57 UTC as 5th comment | 1 reply

That was a near-perfect video. I guess nothing is perfect, so I said "near" perfect. I know I certainly couldn't improve upon it. Great work.

I scanned as many comments as I could but wasn't sure if this question was asked and answered:

Besides the Olympus Pen-F used in the video, what other equipment was used? Were there other video cameras or was the whole thing done with the Pen-F?

There are times in the video when both ladies are taking photos but someone is filming them. What camera was used for those scenes?

Was any lighting used, microphones, etc.?

That was a professional video of outstanding quality. Makes me wonder what the equipment budget was. If it was done solely with the Pen-F then there is hope for amateur filmmakers to really get going.

Thanks for the fun and educational piece.

Link | Posted on Apr 12, 2016 at 19:02 UTC as 46th comment | 1 reply
On article Great Eight: Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX8 review (527 comments in total)
In reply to:

MikeFairbanks: Same price as the new Sony A6300, but I don't see the advantage of going with the Panasonic.

Thanks. That was a great answer, Dagobah. I hadn't thought about it from that perspective.

Link | Posted on Mar 11, 2016 at 14:04 UTC
On article Great Eight: Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX8 review (527 comments in total)

Same price as the new Sony A6300, but I don't see the advantage of going with the Panasonic.

Link | Posted on Mar 10, 2016 at 20:08 UTC as 35th comment | 5 replies

Wish I could afford it. Looks like great.

Link | Posted on Mar 2, 2016 at 00:09 UTC as 41st comment

Are they charging an extra 200 bucks for the brown color?

Link | Posted on Mar 1, 2016 at 14:13 UTC as 26th comment
In reply to:

MikeFairbanks: I don't see the point, since it's been done so many times.

It could also be done in Photoshop if you're simply tying to get a photo of water that has the illusion of being orange. Either way it's just an illusion.

Bernard, I'm not grumpy about it. Just confused, I guess.

But on second thought, I suppose that it would be neat to have it on the wall at home and know that I took it.

Link | Posted on Mar 1, 2016 at 01:36 UTC
In reply to:

MikeFairbanks: I don't see the point, since it's been done so many times.

It could also be done in Photoshop if you're simply tying to get a photo of water that has the illusion of being orange. Either way it's just an illusion.

I agree for the most part. I mean, yeah, I'd like to see it and I'd take a photo if I were there, but I wouldn't make it a mission with a lot of gear and such because it's been done so many times.

Link | Posted on Feb 27, 2016 at 16:07 UTC
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