Earthrise

Earthrise

Lives in United Kingdom United Kingdom
Joined on Nov 11, 2009

Comments

Total: 40, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

tombell1: For me the things that stand out relate to my usage . I use cameras almost every day. Things happening in the village I live, landscape work, family and friend,rarely fast sport

So what makes a BIG difference given that most ILC cameras have good output up to 3200 ISO now ( amazing when you think of film!!!)

IBIS ... this means every lens you use is stabilised. You get clear shape photos at slow shutter speeds.

Thats why I love Pentax and Olympus is unmatchable

Small and compact. Pentax is great for a DSLR and Olympus is incredible as its lenses are all so small. Pentax small primes are lovely
Coherent menus

Thats why I like Pentax and Panasonic

Good grip .. easy to shoot one handed
Pentax and Panasonic G7 score high;y here .. Olympus OMD does not
Fast focusing

For none sports usage the m43 are fantastic and the Pentax is acceptable ...

So that is all logical ... but it does not explain why I enjoy the Fuji X100 . Slow focusing and no IBIS .... but thats how it is

:-) Yep, much the same for the GR I bought recently. On tech sheet specs it doesn't make sense, but using it puts a smile on my face. Despite all efforts reviewing cams is still a bit subjective, so why not give cameras a smile on face rating :-)

Direct link | Posted on Jan 22, 2016 at 19:00 UTC
In reply to:

User3754336485: I like the provocative aspect of this article and must comment.

Well the fact that all cameras are not great gives DPreview the chance to investigate & write about differences, then make recommendations. Viva les differences!

As a contrarian I do have to say that over the past decade the overall image quality of consumer/prosumer-level digital cameras has increased enormously, pretty much no matter which big brand camera you buy.

It seems to me the bulk of that improvement was not in lenses, but in the sensor and related computing element and that advance mirrors the advances in the semiconductor industry overall. I do wonder as the semiconductor industry has stalled in innovation if that will be reflected in cameras to come.

On the same note I do expect all consumer-level enthusiast sensors to trend towards full frame and APS-C (and especially M43) will vanish from ILCs within the next 7 to 10 years.

Great article!

Yep, totally agree. In doing so though they leave themselves open to outside disruptive tech and non cosy companies. I thought Samsung might shake things up, but I think they want to play a different game. Panasonic have nothing to lose so might be the best bet for current companies.

I think the change will come from outside though. There's lots of work and money going into multi-sensor/multi-lens computational cameras, e.g. light.co, and the plenoptic options will broaden soon. And I wouldn't bet against Apple taking one of these approaches and entering the camera market.

Inside 5 years and a camera that approaches current dslr IQ with the form factor of a smartphone will shake things up.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 22, 2016 at 17:05 UTC
In reply to:

User3754336485: I like the provocative aspect of this article and must comment.

Well the fact that all cameras are not great gives DPreview the chance to investigate & write about differences, then make recommendations. Viva les differences!

As a contrarian I do have to say that over the past decade the overall image quality of consumer/prosumer-level digital cameras has increased enormously, pretty much no matter which big brand camera you buy.

It seems to me the bulk of that improvement was not in lenses, but in the sensor and related computing element and that advance mirrors the advances in the semiconductor industry overall. I do wonder as the semiconductor industry has stalled in innovation if that will be reflected in cameras to come.

On the same note I do expect all consumer-level enthusiast sensors to trend towards full frame and APS-C (and especially M43) will vanish from ILCs within the next 7 to 10 years.

Great article!

I'd agree with most of this, especially the first sentance :-)

And in that vein I'd disagree with the last sentence. Actually no, second to last sentence :-)

My take is that FF is an expensive red herring and in 10 years will have gone the same way as medium format. Size, cost of lenses, and convenience will make FF increasingly high end. Improvements in sensor tech, especially if some of the more exotic ideas come to pass will mean APS-C and M43 will become the sweet spot for IQ vs cost.

Consumer level enthusiast cameras are extremely price sensitive and smaller format systems will be always be cheaper.

Plus there is always the stuff we don't know yet factor.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 22, 2016 at 16:38 UTC
In reply to:

Earthrise: It does make me wonder why manufacturers can't pull something together that ticks more boxes. Sony for instance. Leading edge technology, but the ergnomics and interfaces seem ill thought out. They are improving with each iteration, but why couldn't lesson have been learnt from the last 150 years of camera use, or at least the last 30, rather than learn from scratch. Fujifilm, read great but then shoot themselves in the foot with some choices. Ricoh, where thou art my mirrorless miracle.

I guess the simple answer is market. They have to make cameras that sell, and sell well to make money. The market research they do leads them to certain conclusions. But maybe they are asking the wrong questions. The same old same old questions that perhaps just re-inforce their own preconceptions.

Maybe its upto sites like DPReview and others to push a metric to cover this usuability/properness/fun factor. At least with this article you are beginning to ask the rights questions.

Thank you.

True, but its not about advancement as such, it's more about just getting the basics right. Is the AF upto scratch, if not why not and change it. Look at the ergonomics of successful designs and carry these through. I think Samsung did this, but they seemed to have gotten cold feet, maybe at the realisation of the size of the support infrastructure that is required.

Nikon and Canon get this, maybe its true that they are waiting for the tech to catch up with the requirements before they go mirrorless.

I'm not an Apple fan, but at least they start the process in the right way. The design and constraints of the complete finished product. Then work backwards to achieve this in the most profitable way.

Smartphones decimated the compact camera. If camera manufacturers don't even get the basics right, another disruptive technology will come along and do the same to the rest of the industry.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 22, 2016 at 16:11 UTC

It does make me wonder why manufacturers can't pull something together that ticks more boxes. Sony for instance. Leading edge technology, but the ergnomics and interfaces seem ill thought out. They are improving with each iteration, but why couldn't lesson have been learnt from the last 150 years of camera use, or at least the last 30, rather than learn from scratch. Fujifilm, read great but then shoot themselves in the foot with some choices. Ricoh, where thou art my mirrorless miracle.

I guess the simple answer is market. They have to make cameras that sell, and sell well to make money. The market research they do leads them to certain conclusions. But maybe they are asking the wrong questions. The same old same old questions that perhaps just re-inforce their own preconceptions.

Maybe its upto sites like DPReview and others to push a metric to cover this usuability/properness/fun factor. At least with this article you are beginning to ask the rights questions.

Thank you.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 22, 2016 at 15:01 UTC as 166th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

Earthrise: Benjamin, all the best with this endeavour. It's great to see talent being put to use for an important cause. I can't believe in this day and age we are still having to chase hunters of shark fins, rays, elephant ivory, rhino horn and many others. Would be interesting to hear your thoughts on advocacy through art, potentials and pitfalls, promotion vs preaching etc. It would be something I would love to do but wouldn't know where to begin.

It's going to be quite a journey for you then. I look forward to seeing where your travels lead. Indeed it's you and your story, and how you achieve your images as much as the work itself that creates the interest, the connection. Meaningful. That's actually a tricky one to pin down and will change for you over time.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 21, 2016 at 02:33 UTC

Benjamin, all the best with this endeavour. It's great to see talent being put to use for an important cause. I can't believe in this day and age we are still having to chase hunters of shark fins, rays, elephant ivory, rhino horn and many others. Would be interesting to hear your thoughts on advocacy through art, potentials and pitfalls, promotion vs preaching etc. It would be something I would love to do but wouldn't know where to begin.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 20, 2016 at 20:05 UTC as 15th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

fmian: While I appreciate Von Wong's creativity and how he pushes boundaries (usually of safety)... is it just me or do the images, especially the model and the dress look totally manipulated/illustrated. Not photo realistic at all. The look is of the environment being captured with a camera and the model/dress being inserted by hand.
Why go to all the trouble if the end result looks faked?

He has taken the raw image and styled it to be consistent with his previous work, and expression of what he wants to achieve with it. He is very successful, and so would want to give this image the same success and impact that has worked for him in the past to promote a cause that seems to be close to his heart.

But like any image and style of photography it comes down to personal taste. It's a great shot, is it over-cooked? To me no, but to you yes, which is cool :-)

Interesting discussion btw, thanks DPReview for posting this.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 20, 2016 at 10:53 UTC
In reply to:

fmian: While I appreciate Von Wong's creativity and how he pushes boundaries (usually of safety)... is it just me or do the images, especially the model and the dress look totally manipulated/illustrated. Not photo realistic at all. The look is of the environment being captured with a camera and the model/dress being inserted by hand.
Why go to all the trouble if the end result looks faked?

Point is we're talking about the images and help push the sharkshepherd site (which is a good thing) :-)

Direct link | Posted on Jan 20, 2016 at 01:55 UTC
In reply to:

fmian: While I appreciate Von Wong's creativity and how he pushes boundaries (usually of safety)... is it just me or do the images, especially the model and the dress look totally manipulated/illustrated. Not photo realistic at all. The look is of the environment being captured with a camera and the model/dress being inserted by hand.
Why go to all the trouble if the end result looks faked?

No, photoshopping them would be missing the point. They are real, and that adds a great deal to the context. Indeed the fact that they are real is the point.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 20, 2016 at 01:37 UTC
In reply to:

fmian: While I appreciate Von Wong's creativity and how he pushes boundaries (usually of safety)... is it just me or do the images, especially the model and the dress look totally manipulated/illustrated. Not photo realistic at all. The look is of the environment being captured with a camera and the model/dress being inserted by hand.
Why go to all the trouble if the end result looks faked?

Though I'd agree the images almost look too good, knowing how and why they are made makes me appreciate them more.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 20, 2016 at 01:03 UTC
On Connect post Panasonic to launch Lumix DMC-CM10 without phone functionality (132 comments in total)
In reply to:

Earthrise: I'm probably one of the few, well possibly only person, to actually like this idea. If this ever rolled out in Europe, and they bundled the CM10 with a network connection deal I'd take a close look.

Hi, exactly yes. It would also allow the phone to get small again, say watch size or earpiece.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 20, 2016 at 00:41 UTC
On Connect post Panasonic to launch Lumix DMC-CM10 without phone functionality (132 comments in total)

I'm probably one of the few, well possibly only person, to actually like this idea. If this ever rolled out in Europe, and they bundled the CM10 with a network connection deal I'd take a close look.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 20, 2016 at 00:27 UTC as 56th comment | 4 replies
In reply to:

brycesteiner: If this model is still in stores, why would Samsung confirm this discontinuation? No one would buy it because it won't be supported. Dealers couldn't in good conscience recommend it and Samsung doesn't want to take them all back to the warehouses especially if there is a stockpile.

If this being the case, they certainly wouldn't confirm it with a press release, which is what seems to be happening.

@Mark, then why repeat it here?

Direct link | Posted on Nov 12, 2015 at 14:44 UTC

Blah

Direct link | Posted on Nov 12, 2015 at 14:37 UTC as 328th comment
In reply to:

James Booba: OFC it could be they made a deal with a major cam company for providing them their amazing backlit image sensors, and part of the agreement would be they dont make cams themselves. e.g Canon, Leica, etc.

Besides. If the current camera makers want to survive they better bring all their cams down to 1 mount and 1 graphical UI.

Yep, that's my guess too, they are shifting to supplying tech to established market players, whilst leaving the door very slightly ajar. Not sure having just one of everything would help, lack of competition, but you could see it thinning down from what it is currently.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 12, 2015 at 09:43 UTC
In reply to:

meland: I would suggest that DPR would never have helped fuel speculation by printing this rumour unless they actually do know something.

Normally I would agree with you about DPReview and rumours, but this has been building for months, and the uncertainty it has created is newsworthy in itself and even interesting in a this is how a company may do business way. Also, it will take the prodding of a site the size of DPReview to extract a definitive answer from Samsung. On the rumour itself it does sound fishy, the wording, and timing suggests a concerted effort to troll, which would be at new heights, and if it is a troll, then its something we all should be aware and so newsworthy. But the silence from Samsung? Inept awareness of the camera market, or quietly shifting focus, or just oblivious. Whichever way its poor handling by Samsung.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 12, 2015 at 09:37 UTC
On article Erez Marom: On the importance of naming images (105 comments in total)
In reply to:

NoRules: Lee Friedlander was once asked why he always only have name of the place and date as titles. He answerd "That is the only objective aspect of my pictures". There is nothing more to say. Let the image speak for it self. When I read what he said I felt very releaved. Photography means writing with light. It's a passive (in most times) activity. We have a device that register light. Behind it we can manipulate it, and we can manipulate what's in front of it (staged photography). The only objective values are time and place. If we go beyond that we enter the realm of metaphysics and mysticism, and that is not needed. The pictures are beautiful, no need to hang a veil over them like titles that obscure and reduce them. Pure photography tells a story that do not need words. If we cross that line we end up with a mess. IMHO.

I'd actually agree with you both here. In theory you'd want to let the image speak of itself, but in practice having a title does make an image more accessible and even more successful. I think the trick is to have titles that in themselves are open to interpretation, that suggest rather than confine. Literal descriptions could be too confining but cryptic or titles that suggest links, e.g. the harp one above, work better. Course this is purely a subjective point if view. The best way is whatever works best for you!

Direct link | Posted on Oct 25, 2015 at 13:27 UTC
On article SmugMug Films: Renee Robyn's digital domain (18 comments in total)

Indeed, wow! Thanks for posting this.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 14, 2015 at 19:11 UTC as 8th comment

Its finally dawning on me on how to select a camera from the myriad of options. Lenses. Which lenses do I covet. The Loxias on Sony FE seem fantastic, and these Pro zooms do to. An A7s with the Loxias and an EM1 with a set of these would sort everything. Shame I have such expensive tastes and can afford none of them :-)

Direct link | Posted on Nov 2, 2014 at 12:00 UTC as 55th comment
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