NGGurton

NGGurton

Lives in United States NW, IN, United States
Works as a Independent commercial photographer
Joined on Sep 7, 2010
About me:

Photographer with 20 years experience in the commercial world, specializing in Fashion and Music/Editorial. Currently working on a new website, which will launch in the Spring of 2012, as well a 'coffee-table' book of photographs to be published in the near future.

Comments

Total: 5, showing: 1 – 5
In reply to:

ianz28: I wonder how much more money this website is generating for Amazon now that they post book reviews a couple of times per week?

Of course that would be outside of the money already generated through advertising and click-throughs.

Well, first off, you would need to get Amazon to release sales figures publicly, and then get Nielsen Ratings to release similar data based on customer and expert reviews of it books, and, and, and... all of which Amazon and anyone else connected to them will block. But I suspect, based on my own experiences and personal observations that the amount of sales Amazon generates from book reviews here and from websites of similar size are infinitesimal at best. Similarly, which photography books I purchase is based on reviews by a lengthy list of editors and reveiwers, (mostly full-time paid staff working for larger publications like the NY Times or Wall Street Journal, Photo District News, etc), and my personal interests. In regrds to Michael Freeman's book here, and the "Photographer's Eye", I have them both and refer to them regularly, as I do with Edward Weston's "Daybooks".

Direct link | Posted on Nov 27, 2011 at 09:08 UTC
In reply to:

Marshal: And this one. How to Photograph Men:

http://www.petapixel.com/2011/10/04/men-photographed-in-stereotypically-female-poses/

As I'm watching the video, I keep thinking, 'Yolanda Dominguez's concept is absolutely brilliant! I wish I had thought of this'.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 15, 2011 at 04:28 UTC

OK let me add a few actual titles, which you can add to your library to after purchasing this vastly superior read. "One Thosand New York Buildings" by Bill Harris. "Art of The Automobile: The 100 Greatest Cars", by Dennis Adler. "Master Shots: 100 Advanced Camera Techniques To Get An Expensive Look On Your Low Budget Movie", by Christopher Kenworthy. And finally, "1000 Places To See Before You Die", by Patricia Schultz. It's a numerologists dream collection.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 15, 2011 at 03:41 UTC as 2nd comment
On Photographer LaChapelle can sue Rihanna over 'copycat' video news story (114 comments in total)
In reply to:

NGGurton: It matters not if you disagree with Judge Scheindlin. It matters not if you feel the two pieces in question are completely identical or dissimilar. And it definiitely does not matter if you like dislike LaChapelle's work. What is important, is the fact that nearly since it's inception, photography has been a victim to other artists working in other mediums, who use our images and our very ideas as inspiration for their own work, without fear of consequences for their actions. Even the U.S. Supreme court, in a completely seperate ruling, declared that photography is not worthy of the same protection as given to literary works or musical composition. ASMP, PPA, APA, NPPA, and a variety of other organizations have worked tirelessly to protect the rights and the images of professional photographers, and still we are vulnerable to outright theft by others. Photographers, both amateur and professional, need to work together to end this practice.

Correction. It was a lowercourt, on a completely seperate issue that suggested photographs did not meet the criteria of being protected like that of literary works or songs written by musicians composers, etcx. Sorry for the error.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 26, 2011 at 03:00 UTC
On Photographer LaChapelle can sue Rihanna over 'copycat' video news story (114 comments in total)

It matters not if you disagree with Judge Scheindlin. It matters not if you feel the two pieces in question are completely identical or dissimilar. And it definiitely does not matter if you like dislike LaChapelle's work. What is important, is the fact that nearly since it's inception, photography has been a victim to other artists working in other mediums, who use our images and our very ideas as inspiration for their own work, without fear of consequences for their actions. Even the U.S. Supreme court, in a completely seperate ruling, declared that photography is not worthy of the same protection as given to literary works or musical composition. ASMP, PPA, APA, NPPA, and a variety of other organizations have worked tirelessly to protect the rights and the images of professional photographers, and still we are vulnerable to outright theft by others. Photographers, both amateur and professional, need to work together to end this practice.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 26, 2011 at 01:55 UTC as 43rd comment | 1 reply
Total: 5, showing: 1 – 5