bartjeej

bartjeej

Lives in United States United States
Joined on Aug 3, 2010

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Total: 25, showing: 1 – 20
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Joed700: I would like to see APS-C cameras to disappear. During the film era, we only had 35mm SLR and point-n-shoot for most people. The APS-C breed was introduced at a time when chips were still quite expensive/lack of technology for FF DSLR. Today, FF DSLR starts at around $1600 price range while APS-C are around $1000 - $1700, which is ridiculous. The existence of APS-C somehow made the FF (old 35mm equil.) into a higher class. I don't think it will cost that much to produce FF compared to APS-C. It's just an opportunity for camera manufacturers to make more money. Point-n-shoot has it's place because they are compact and good for traveling while the APS-C are about the same size as FF DSLR; APS-C also lacks shallow DOF; not a desirable option for isolating your subject....

I actually agree with you on that; lenses should be marketed something like '56 f/1.2 (85 f/1.8 equivalent)', instead of '56 f/1.2 (85mm equivalent)', or even worse, '56 f/1.2 (85mm f/1.2!!!)'. The latter style is particularly common on fixed lens cameras and is very misleading indeed. If equivalencies are mentioned, they should give both the focal length and the aperture equivalence, not just pick and choose what makes the camera / lens looks most impressive.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 2, 2014 at 08:05 UTC
In reply to:

Joed700: I would like to see APS-C cameras to disappear. During the film era, we only had 35mm SLR and point-n-shoot for most people. The APS-C breed was introduced at a time when chips were still quite expensive/lack of technology for FF DSLR. Today, FF DSLR starts at around $1600 price range while APS-C are around $1000 - $1700, which is ridiculous. The existence of APS-C somehow made the FF (old 35mm equil.) into a higher class. I don't think it will cost that much to produce FF compared to APS-C. It's just an opportunity for camera manufacturers to make more money. Point-n-shoot has it's place because they are compact and good for traveling while the APS-C are about the same size as FF DSLR; APS-C also lacks shallow DOF; not a desirable option for isolating your subject....

I would love to see 2 images from you, with both systems shot from the exact same place, and the subject at the exact same distance.

If possible, it'd be nice to have a tape measure running alongside the subject into the distance, so that we can compare DOF as well; in that case, have the Fuji at either f/1.2 or f/1.4, and the Nikon at F/2.

As for the DPR image: that's due to the subject not being in the exact same place in the photos; she's a bit higher in the APSC pics than in the FF pics (compare the position of her head to the dots), which makes it look as if she's further away since you're seeing more of her body. Both FF and APSC have 20x30 background dots in view (meaning the background is the same size) and in both images, the width of her head incl hair is 11 dots (meaning the subject is the same size). Can't believe I actually spent my time counting that, but there ya go. The images prove my point, not yours. Still, I'd love to see your images "proving" your point ;)

Direct link | Posted on Oct 1, 2014 at 06:31 UTC
In reply to:

Joed700: I would like to see APS-C cameras to disappear. During the film era, we only had 35mm SLR and point-n-shoot for most people. The APS-C breed was introduced at a time when chips were still quite expensive/lack of technology for FF DSLR. Today, FF DSLR starts at around $1600 price range while APS-C are around $1000 - $1700, which is ridiculous. The existence of APS-C somehow made the FF (old 35mm equil.) into a higher class. I don't think it will cost that much to produce FF compared to APS-C. It's just an opportunity for camera manufacturers to make more money. Point-n-shoot has it's place because they are compact and good for traveling while the APS-C are about the same size as FF DSLR; APS-C also lacks shallow DOF; not a desirable option for isolating your subject....

In addition to that, in the case we're discussing here, the apertures are NOT equivalent; the aperture on the APSC is LARGER than the one on the full frame, giving even shallower DOF.

Also note how in both the first and the second image of the DPR article, both the subject and the background are the same size in each of the sensor sizes. WHUAT?!? that's impossible right? oh wait, we're not living in joed700 world, but in the real one. Equivalent focal lengths give the exact same field of view and the exact same subject size and background; that's what makes them equivalent. Equivalent apertures on equivalent focal lengths give not only the exact same subject size and background, but also the exact same DOF. Faster than equivalent apertures on equivalent focal lengths give same subject & background size with shallower DOF. Seriously, just read the DPR article (all of it! not just the parts that suit you!) until you freaking get it, even if that means re-reading it 391 times.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 30, 2014 at 12:48 UTC
In reply to:

Joed700: I would like to see APS-C cameras to disappear. During the film era, we only had 35mm SLR and point-n-shoot for most people. The APS-C breed was introduced at a time when chips were still quite expensive/lack of technology for FF DSLR. Today, FF DSLR starts at around $1600 price range while APS-C are around $1000 - $1700, which is ridiculous. The existence of APS-C somehow made the FF (old 35mm equil.) into a higher class. I don't think it will cost that much to produce FF compared to APS-C. It's just an opportunity for camera manufacturers to make more money. Point-n-shoot has it's place because they are compact and good for traveling while the APS-C are about the same size as FF DSLR; APS-C also lacks shallow DOF; not a desirable option for isolating your subject....

dude... dafuq... you really stun me with your inability to see it. First of all, if the field of view is the same, and the distance is the same, then both subject and background and foreground and everything in the friggen frame is the same size. if you're trying to say it's impossible to have the same composition with different sized sensors, I'd like a hit of whatever it is you're smoking.

The mdavid.com article, in the cons part at least, is true but ONLY if you mount the same lens on different sensor sizes. Here we're talking about different lenses on different sensor sizes.

The dpreview article: first image is with the same f-stop, which proves nothing. try the SECOND image, with equivalent f-stops. to quote DPR: 'As you can see, the real-world examples bear-out the expectations to a pretty good degree - when set to 'equivalent' apertures, the background blur is very similar.( ) the background dots have all been spread to a similar degree, suggesting the same depth-of-field( )'

Direct link | Posted on Sep 30, 2014 at 12:40 UTC
In reply to:

Joed700: I would like to see APS-C cameras to disappear. During the film era, we only had 35mm SLR and point-n-shoot for most people. The APS-C breed was introduced at a time when chips were still quite expensive/lack of technology for FF DSLR. Today, FF DSLR starts at around $1600 price range while APS-C are around $1000 - $1700, which is ridiculous. The existence of APS-C somehow made the FF (old 35mm equil.) into a higher class. I don't think it will cost that much to produce FF compared to APS-C. It's just an opportunity for camera manufacturers to make more money. Point-n-shoot has it's place because they are compact and good for traveling while the APS-C are about the same size as FF DSLR; APS-C also lacks shallow DOF; not a desirable option for isolating your subject....

Maybe this article by the good people of DPR will make it clearer than I can:

http://www.dpreview.com/articles/2666934640/what-is-equivalence-and-why-should-i-care?utm_campaign=internal-link&utm_source=features&utm_medium=sidebar-block-Homepage&ref=features

Direct link | Posted on Sep 29, 2014 at 20:17 UTC
In reply to:

Joed700: I would like to see APS-C cameras to disappear. During the film era, we only had 35mm SLR and point-n-shoot for most people. The APS-C breed was introduced at a time when chips were still quite expensive/lack of technology for FF DSLR. Today, FF DSLR starts at around $1600 price range while APS-C are around $1000 - $1700, which is ridiculous. The existence of APS-C somehow made the FF (old 35mm equil.) into a higher class. I don't think it will cost that much to produce FF compared to APS-C. It's just an opportunity for camera manufacturers to make more money. Point-n-shoot has it's place because they are compact and good for traveling while the APS-C are about the same size as FF DSLR; APS-C also lacks shallow DOF; not a desirable option for isolating your subject....

Joed700: DUDE! you really don't get it do you? The APSC crop factor is 1.52, giving a 56mm lens on APSC the same angle of view as 85.12mm on FF. So when you say 'The sample pictures I took with both lenses ( ) shows that the FF 85mm wins because the 56mm has way too much background', you're talking complete and utter rubbish. The field of view, and therefore the amount of background, is THE SAME!

'the DOF calculator shows that the differences between the 56mm and the FF 85mm is only 0.01 ft at f1.2 vs f2 respectively.'
That's entirely possible, depending on the subject distance. Still, it comes out in favour of the APSC sensor.

If you put a faster lens (w/ the same angle of view) on the APSC camera, you can both regain the shallow DOF, and by lowering ISO, also make up for the lower light gathering ability of the smaller sensor. APSC and FF differ by ~1.07 stops; if the difference in f-number is more, the APSC will outperform the FF, assuming equal angle of view & sensor efficiency.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 29, 2014 at 20:13 UTC
In reply to:

Joed700: I would like to see APS-C cameras to disappear. During the film era, we only had 35mm SLR and point-n-shoot for most people. The APS-C breed was introduced at a time when chips were still quite expensive/lack of technology for FF DSLR. Today, FF DSLR starts at around $1600 price range while APS-C are around $1000 - $1700, which is ridiculous. The existence of APS-C somehow made the FF (old 35mm equil.) into a higher class. I don't think it will cost that much to produce FF compared to APS-C. It's just an opportunity for camera manufacturers to make more money. Point-n-shoot has it's place because they are compact and good for traveling while the APS-C are about the same size as FF DSLR; APS-C also lacks shallow DOF; not a desirable option for isolating your subject....

Joed700 - as I explained in my post, the 56 has the same FOV as an 84mm lens on FF, since it's mated to a Fuji body with an APSC sensor, giving a 1.5x crop factor. So no, the FF 85 does not win. The 85/2 would win if you put it on an APSC body, but that's not what you/we were talking about. And yes, in terms of DOF, numbers do show everything, since it's simply a measurement. Smoothness of the OOF areas are more complicated, but DOF isn't.

In fact it's quite easy to see that the 56/1.2 wins if you multiply both FOV and aperture by its crop factor; its full frame equivalent would be 84/1.8. That trumps 85/2.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 22, 2014 at 19:41 UTC
In reply to:

Joed700: I would like to see APS-C cameras to disappear. During the film era, we only had 35mm SLR and point-n-shoot for most people. The APS-C breed was introduced at a time when chips were still quite expensive/lack of technology for FF DSLR. Today, FF DSLR starts at around $1600 price range while APS-C are around $1000 - $1700, which is ridiculous. The existence of APS-C somehow made the FF (old 35mm equil.) into a higher class. I don't think it will cost that much to produce FF compared to APS-C. It's just an opportunity for camera manufacturers to make more money. Point-n-shoot has it's place because they are compact and good for traveling while the APS-C are about the same size as FF DSLR; APS-C also lacks shallow DOF; not a desirable option for isolating your subject....

Joed, your example about the 56/1.2 and 85/2 sounds to me as if it's impossible, as far as DOF is concerned. DOF is simply a function of effective focal length and physical aperture opening (and subject distance). 56mm times 1.5 crop factor gives 84mm, which is a negligible difference to 85mm. 56/1.2 gives a physical aperture opening of 46.7mm, whereas 85/2 gives 42.5mm. That's not a great difference, but it does come out in favour of the Fuji lens. In short, if you're seeing shallower DOF on the FF with 85/2, you're doing something wrong (yes, really; go check the online DOF calculators if you don't believe me). In terms of smoothness of the OOF areas, I really can't judge that.

The whole size/performance thing, as I see it, is more or less a smooth line, with some temporary bumps at certain points when new technology is introduced on one system before another. At some point most people will consider the results "good enough", and over time smaller cameras/lenses reach that point.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 21, 2014 at 22:08 UTC
In reply to:

KonstantinosK: You forgot to mention that nowadays there are small mirrorless cameras, with large 3/4" or APS-C sensors, that are truly compact in size (albeit with interchangeable lenses), that very often can be had for as low as 300$ or maybe lower, and that can be used easily as P&S, with results unthinkable a few years ago. Anybody choosing a compact with a x30 zoom over an entry-level APS-C mirroless with a kit lens is simply misinformed.

depends on what your purpose for the camera is, doesn't it? A birder will have spectacularly little use for a mirrorless or DSLR with kit lens, as will most people looking to shoot (shy) wildlife. The superzoom will do reasonably well at daily life shots and take reasonably good shots of far-away objects. The mirrorless + kit lens will be good to great at daily life shots, but it's completely useless at shooting faraway animals. Content first, and all that ;)

to add some numbers: $300 nowadays gets you a superzoom with 30-60x zoom. Let's say you get one that has a 1000mm equivalent FOV, and 16mp. Your entry-level mirrorless with its kit lens reaches about 85mm equivalent. By the time you've cropped your 16mp mirrorless to match the superzoom's FOV, you're down to 1.5 megapixel - less than a full HD computer screen. Even with the pixel-level crappiness on the superzoom it'll still easily outresolve the mirrorless, as well as make framing much, much easier.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 19, 2014 at 19:04 UTC
In reply to:

Joed700: I would like to see APS-C cameras to disappear. During the film era, we only had 35mm SLR and point-n-shoot for most people. The APS-C breed was introduced at a time when chips were still quite expensive/lack of technology for FF DSLR. Today, FF DSLR starts at around $1600 price range while APS-C are around $1000 - $1700, which is ridiculous. The existence of APS-C somehow made the FF (old 35mm equil.) into a higher class. I don't think it will cost that much to produce FF compared to APS-C. It's just an opportunity for camera manufacturers to make more money. Point-n-shoot has it's place because they are compact and good for traveling while the APS-C are about the same size as FF DSLR; APS-C also lacks shallow DOF; not a desirable option for isolating your subject....

oh and 'cropping a 35mm and making it look like a 50mm' does increase (apparent) DOF, since (as I mentioned above) the blur, like everything else in the frame, is enlarged (assuming you view both images at the same absolute size). In more technical terms, the circle of confusion becomes larger when you crop.

the reason I speak of 'apparent DOF' is that, technically speaking, only an infinitely shallow plane is ever in focus, but the limits of both output resolution and human vision make it seem that there's actually zone of a certain depth that's in focus.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 19, 2014 at 10:09 UTC
In reply to:

Joed700: I would like to see APS-C cameras to disappear. During the film era, we only had 35mm SLR and point-n-shoot for most people. The APS-C breed was introduced at a time when chips were still quite expensive/lack of technology for FF DSLR. Today, FF DSLR starts at around $1600 price range while APS-C are around $1000 - $1700, which is ridiculous. The existence of APS-C somehow made the FF (old 35mm equil.) into a higher class. I don't think it will cost that much to produce FF compared to APS-C. It's just an opportunity for camera manufacturers to make more money. Point-n-shoot has it's place because they are compact and good for traveling while the APS-C are about the same size as FF DSLR; APS-C also lacks shallow DOF; not a desirable option for isolating your subject....

Joed700: when you say 'when I took the same pictures using both APSC and FF cameras', you should specify what you mean by the same pictures. There're at least 3 ways of making 'the same picture':
1. same lens, same settings. In this case, APSC has shallower DOF since the physical aperture is the same but the crop factor enlarges the blur and therefore makes the apparent DOF shallower.
2. lens with equal FOV, same settings (f-number). In this case, FF wins, since it will have a physical aperture of 50/2 instead of 35/2, and the blur is enlarged to the same degree on both cameras due to the FOV being the same.
3. lens with equal FOV and equal physical aperture (different f-number): 35/1.4 on APSC and 50/2 on FF. In this case, the result is the same, and this is really the only case that can be called 'taking the same picture'.

Only one of three possible ways of 'taking the same picture' results in FF having shallower depth of field, and I'd say it's the most random method of the three.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 19, 2014 at 09:49 UTC
In reply to:

KonstantinosK: You forgot to mention that nowadays there are small mirrorless cameras, with large 3/4" or APS-C sensors, that are truly compact in size (albeit with interchangeable lenses), that very often can be had for as low as 300$ or maybe lower, and that can be used easily as P&S, with results unthinkable a few years ago. Anybody choosing a compact with a x30 zoom over an entry-level APS-C mirroless with a kit lens is simply misinformed.

'Anybody choosing a compact with a x30 zoom over an entry-level APS-C mirroless with a kit lens is simply misinformed.'

I don't agree at all. Even if you take into account the reduced pixel level sharpness of those 30x zooms' small sensors, you still get zoom capability above any lens for any mirrorless camera out there - let alone kit lenses.
Not only that, but the superzoom compact will be considerably smaller than a mirrorless camera with really long zoom range lens, and since you're talking about an entry-level mirrorless camera, the superzoom might just offer more manual control too. I'm a big fan of mirrorless, but compacts or superzooms still have their place.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 19, 2014 at 07:50 UTC
On What is equivalence and why should I care? article (2067 comments in total)
In reply to:

bartjeej: Good article, I'm sure the issue will become clearer for a lot of folks.

One request though; could you PLEASE not contribute to the already much too pervasive myth that the word 'bokeh' only refers to the quality of the blur and not the quantity? It simply means blur, and you can have lots or little blur/bokeh just like you can have pleasant or unpleasant blur/bokeh. 'The quality of the blur' would be 'boke(h)-aji'. Just a little pet pieve of mine :)

haha never knew that, frsIII, but it makes sense :) much like 'dense' can be an insult in English.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 8, 2014 at 18:36 UTC
On What is equivalence and why should I care? article (2067 comments in total)

Good article, I'm sure the issue will become clearer for a lot of folks.

One request though; could you PLEASE not contribute to the already much too pervasive myth that the word 'bokeh' only refers to the quality of the blur and not the quantity? It simply means blur, and you can have lots or little blur/bokeh just like you can have pleasant or unpleasant blur/bokeh. 'The quality of the blur' would be 'boke(h)-aji'. Just a little pet pieve of mine :)

Direct link | Posted on Jul 7, 2014 at 21:51 UTC as 280th comment | 4 replies
On Sony Alpha 7 Review preview (1610 comments in total)

This may have been noted already, but I'm quite sure the camera has no built in flash, despite what the review says in the key features list.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 23, 2014 at 09:50 UTC as 274th comment | 1 reply
On How many megapixels do you need? post (221 comments in total)
In reply to:

mikesco: For typical photos 300 dpi is overkill. Many photo labs only have equipment that prints at either 240 or 256 dpi. It is rare for 210 dpi not to give great results and with larger prints you can often get away with 180 - 150 dpi.

Agreed. This 300ppi myth really ought not be spread even further. It only makes sense at close viewing distances - say the distance you'd read a book at - since human vision simply isn't sharp enough to discern 300ppi at longer distances. And the larger the print, the longer the viewing distance. 10 sharp megapixels is enough for prints of just about any size, provided you're interested in the overall image and don't press your nose against the paper for maximum detail in one specific part of a large print.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 21, 2013 at 12:27 UTC
In reply to:

Tape5: RX100 is so incredibly capable and sexy it makes me take ten times as many photos with it as my other two cameras, both DSLRs. I am having a complete love affair with this unobtrusive beauty.

These days I think if a shot cannot be taken with my RX100, I don't want it at all. Wide at 1.8 or with a tiny zoom to still keep it open at around 4.0, I am taking pictures I can crop and enlarge to crazy levels.

Who needs a zoom better than 20 million super sharp pixels?

If there is one camera that heralds the end of chunky ugly DSLRs, it is this one. Sony is certainly here to change things and they are experimenting with RX1 as well. And all the while they are doing this, they are making RED bleed at the other front with their video machines. Insane.

I'll agree that cameras like the one you listed are currently out of the reach of non-DSLRs in terms of capability, but I think that won't last very long.

Having said that, I'm sure you'll agree that many people who are serious about their photography have no need whatsoever for a heavy bulky beast, when smaller cameras can get image quality that meets just about anyone's criteria in the vast, vast majority of situations (and remember, we were talking about camera's, not just compacts; so CSCs / mirrorless cameras should also be taken into consideration). So for lots serious photographers, there are non-DSLRs that do indeed render DSLRs obsolete.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 4, 2012 at 13:58 UTC
In reply to:

Tape5: RX100 is so incredibly capable and sexy it makes me take ten times as many photos with it as my other two cameras, both DSLRs. I am having a complete love affair with this unobtrusive beauty.

These days I think if a shot cannot be taken with my RX100, I don't want it at all. Wide at 1.8 or with a tiny zoom to still keep it open at around 4.0, I am taking pictures I can crop and enlarge to crazy levels.

Who needs a zoom better than 20 million super sharp pixels?

If there is one camera that heralds the end of chunky ugly DSLRs, it is this one. Sony is certainly here to change things and they are experimenting with RX1 as well. And all the while they are doing this, they are making RED bleed at the other front with their video machines. Insane.

so GaryJP, you're saying that "those serious about photography" need to have a DSLR? in the words of AmateurSnaps above: what a load of bull.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 4, 2012 at 00:36 UTC
In reply to:

Tape5: RX100 is so incredibly capable and sexy it makes me take ten times as many photos with it as my other two cameras, both DSLRs. I am having a complete love affair with this unobtrusive beauty.

These days I think if a shot cannot be taken with my RX100, I don't want it at all. Wide at 1.8 or with a tiny zoom to still keep it open at around 4.0, I am taking pictures I can crop and enlarge to crazy levels.

Who needs a zoom better than 20 million super sharp pixels?

If there is one camera that heralds the end of chunky ugly DSLRs, it is this one. Sony is certainly here to change things and they are experimenting with RX1 as well. And all the while they are doing this, they are making RED bleed at the other front with their video machines. Insane.

I think this is the first compact camera that, for the majority of consumers, will be able to do everything they want from a DSLR. That is, the very large group of (potential) DSLR buyers that just wants consistently good image quality in all situations and fast performance, and isn't interested in buying anything other than the kit lens.

So yes, in that sense, the RX100 can be considered the end of DSLRs' ubiquity, or at least the entry level DSLRs. And for most of the (potential) DSLR buyers who are interested in chancing lenses, CSCs are, or will soon be, able to fulfill their needs as well.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 3, 2012 at 23:20 UTC
In reply to:

bartjeej: My ultimate travel compact: a 1" to 4/3 sized sensor (preferably in 4/3 aspect ratio) and a fast, versatile single focal length lens (somewhere in the 30 - 40mm efl range), in a waterproof body that's about the size of the Canon G15.

A decent grip and two clickable dials; a vertical one, recessed in the top surface, and a horizontal one recessed in the rear surface. Both dials clickable to give aperture, shutter speed, iso and exposure compensation their own, directly accessible dial, and all of that can be adjusted with one hand and without moving your hand out of the shooting position.

Battery life of at least 500 shots. Oh, and USB charging and wifi file transfer, so you never have to open up the camera beyond the usb charging point.

In terms of firmware, sweep panorama and in-camera raw processing.

Price, provided it's waterproof: € 1000.

Oh, and a second camera: similar as the one above, but with a smaller sensor, and (much) longer zoom than the current waterproof cameras.

Yes, and preferably with a fixed lens (20/1.7 would be fine with me!) to make it a good bit less deep. If the GX2 turns out to be weatherproof I'd be tempted big time!

Direct link | Posted on Oct 20, 2012 at 00:44 UTC
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