Jim Scarff

Jim Scarff

Lives in United States Berkeley, CA, United States
Works as a Attorney (retired)
Joined on Oct 22, 2002
About me:

I am particularly interested in wildlife photography -- whales, dolphins, birds, wild canids.

Comments

Total: 9, showing: 1 – 9
On Canon PowerShot G3 X: What you need to know article (570 comments in total)

The quality of the camera's images and videos as displayed in Canon's promotional videos impressed me. Worth a look:

http://usa.canon.com/cusa/consumer/products/cameras/digital_cameras/powershot_g3_x#Experience_the_G3_X

THE PRICE:

1) I think price is really $1,250 not $999 since I cannot imagine spending that much money and not getting the optional EVF. (BTW the external EVF is very good, I have it with my EOS-M3).

2) That's a RIDICULOUS price for this camera with its 1" sensor.

The camera is compact, but not pocketable. Given its size, the Canon is competing with the Panasonic FZ-1000 (I have one, and love it and its excellent EVF), and even the Canon EOS-M3 which has a bigger sensor and can be had for the same price, perhaps less.

Canon drop the price $400-500 and I would consider this camera given its apparently rugged build, but until then there seem to be so many better choices at that price.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 19, 2015 at 04:40 UTC as 44th comment | 1 reply

I used the Tamron 150-600 on a Canon 5D MkIII for 6 weeks in southern Africa last summer. It worked very well, and it is hard for me to distinguish by quality which photos I took with that combination, and which I took with the Canon 7D + 500mm f/4 + 1.4X TC.

I sold my Tamron lens and 5D Mk III, and got in its place a Canon 7D Mk II and 100-400 Mk II. I have been exploring using the 1.4X TC with that combination and have been very pleasantly surprised with the image quality (which had been dreadful with the old 7D + 100-400). The 7D Mk II will still autofocus with the teleconverter, but you are limited to the central spot, whereas on the Tamron you have access to all the autofocus points. I like my Canon combination for durability, weather resistance and speed of focus. But this is all good gear.

A big agree from me that technique often/generally ends up being a much bigger factor in image quality at these extreme focal lengths than which of these lenses you have on your camera.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 9, 2015 at 23:09 UTC as 19th comment
On Integrating the MacBook Air into a pro workflow article (347 comments in total)

I am a serious amateur photographer (Canon 7D & 70D) and currently use a late 2013 MacBook Pro Retina 15" when traveling, often internationally. I had a lat 2012 13" MacBook Air briefly, but traded up to the Pro Retina (at first 13", now 15") because the screen on the Air was BAD for color rendition and accuracy. The color hues would shift dramatically with small adjustments in the vertical tilt of the display, making it almost unusable for editing photos. I am not a great fan of OS X and my home desktop is a Windows 8 machine, but the MBPR and its high quality display is the best travel laptop for photography I have found.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 17, 2014 at 07:49 UTC as 23rd comment | 1 reply
On Integrating the MacBook Air into a pro workflow article (347 comments in total)
In reply to:

munro harrap: Since I first posted not a single respondant (note how many please, has said what equipment they are using.NOBODY. And note that this article is not accompanied by a video illustrating what the author actually does (and yes, I can be a lowenough to stream easily onanything video!).

I am a serious amateur photographer and currently use a late 2013 MacBook Pro Retina 15" when traveling, often internationally. I had a lat 2012 13" MacBook Air briefly, but traded up to the Pro Retina (at first 13", now 15") because the screen on the Air was BAD for color rendition and accuracy. The color hues would shift dramatically with small adjustments in the vertical tilt of the display, making it almost unusable for editing photos. I am not a great fan of OS X and my home desktop is a Windows 8 machine, but the MBPR and its high quality display is the best travel laptop for photography I have found.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 17, 2014 at 07:42 UTC
On Tamrac 5592 Big Wheels SpeedRoller 2X Bag Review article (44 comments in total)
In reply to:

erichK: International carry-on weight limit: 10KG or 22 pounds.

Weight of this bag: 12 pounds.

Enough said: increasingly, airlines do weigh carry-ons.

I concur. That is why I never take my wheeled heavy photobag anymore. Instead, I carry the Gura Gear Kiboko bag (4 pounds) that lets me actually put camera gear, and not just an empty bag in the overhead.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 2, 2013 at 04:17 UTC
In reply to:

Josh152: Wow so basically flickr went and copied the look and feel of 500PX.

As a "Pro" user who has been using Flickr for 6 years and has 4,800 photos on-line, I HATE, HATE, HATE the new interface. I am also very angry that Flickr did not give users any warning, does not give users many, if any, formatting options for how the pages look, and did not put up a beta of the format for people to comment on. They treated their customers like we are cockroaches.

Direct link | Posted on May 22, 2013 at 04:04 UTC
On User Review: Gura Gear Kiboko 30L Backpack article (113 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jim Scarff: I bought one shortly after it came out and LOVE it. My previous bag was a Lowepro Roadrunner AW which I still have, but very rarely use now. I bought the Kiboko 30L for international travel, but now use it all the time. The Roadrunner AW has wheels and is very secure....but very heavy (15+ lbs.?) The Kiboko 30L is about 4 pounds - a huge benefit.

I travel with a Canon 400mm DO lens, a 70-300mm L, 1.4X TC, a 7D and a 60D cameras, a medium weight carbon fiber tripod, flash, 18-135mm lens, etc. No problem fitting that all in/on the bag with quick access to everything.

The biggest challenge I see in travel outside the U.S. is the common 7 kg (15 lbs) weight limit for carry-on baggage. My experience is airlines enforce this. With the Kiboko I can pack my 2 cameras, and lenses and still be under. Plus although it is slightly longer than international length limits, it is soft and can easily be compressed to fit into the allowed volume. Never had a problem.

Where did I get the 7 kg limit for carry-ons? - Air New Zealand both internally and internationally. I have flown there 3 times from the U.S. in the last 4 years, and had my carry-on weighed on every flight. The 30L saved my neck as I was under the limit by only a few grams. Also Virgin Australia.

Direct link | Posted on May 8, 2013 at 06:25 UTC
On User Review: Gura Gear Kiboko 30L Backpack article (113 comments in total)

I bought one shortly after it came out and LOVE it. My previous bag was a Lowepro Roadrunner AW which I still have, but very rarely use now. I bought the Kiboko 30L for international travel, but now use it all the time. The Roadrunner AW has wheels and is very secure....but very heavy (15+ lbs.?) The Kiboko 30L is about 4 pounds - a huge benefit.

I travel with a Canon 400mm DO lens, a 70-300mm L, 1.4X TC, a 7D and a 60D cameras, a medium weight carbon fiber tripod, flash, 18-135mm lens, etc. No problem fitting that all in/on the bag with quick access to everything.

The biggest challenge I see in travel outside the U.S. is the common 7 kg (15 lbs) weight limit for carry-on baggage. My experience is airlines enforce this. With the Kiboko I can pack my 2 cameras, and lenses and still be under. Plus although it is slightly longer than international length limits, it is soft and can easily be compressed to fit into the allowed volume. Never had a problem.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 19, 2012 at 17:28 UTC as 35th comment | 7 replies
On Olympus shares suffer as former CEO goes on the attack article (193 comments in total)
In reply to:

whtchocla7e: Disgruntled employee.

Read the letter about how the Chairman (not the fired CEO) apears to have been a party to a $1 billion embezzlement at Olympus.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 19, 2011 at 01:06 UTC
Total: 9, showing: 1 – 9