iamphil

iamphil

Lives in Canada Canada
Joined on Aug 26, 2002

Comments

Total: 45, showing: 1 – 20
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They invented tripod collars for a reason. The same principles extend to shooting handheld with heavy lenses... You shouldn't need to buy this thing at all.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 18, 2014 at 11:40 UTC as 72nd comment
In reply to:

Minos82: I will shed a tear with grad photographers when all of the following becomes true:
- Grad images stop charging extortionate fees from already indebt students for their graduation image

- These images are indeed actual work of art and not an industrialized process devoid of any workmanship
and finally:

- Grads are given the opportunity to actually have friends or family step in the very place the photographer is during the graduation ceremony so as to take shots of "the moment". This "golden position", devoid of any obstruction, is unfortunately reserved/attributed in a monopolistic way to these people therefore preventing parents to take better pictures of their own offsprings' graduation

Untill then, no tears from me. Those businesses, clothed as education institutions, would sell your homeworsk to tabloids if they could.

I was under the impression works had to be creative to be copyrightable. The bar is obviously too low.

Direct link | Posted on May 29, 2014 at 07:28 UTC
In reply to:

AbrasiveReducer: I hope a business student somewhere is following this. We'll never know but it would be interesting to compare the cost of admitting the problem up front vs. denying it and having to fix it anyhow.

Even more interesting would be the thought process that led them to believe their customers would accept the situation. To be fair, the intensity of Nikon fans may have misled them somewhat.

I wouldn't be surprised if the EU played a role in this too, because they are far less forgiving of warranty shenanigans.

Cultural arrogance and hubris would be my guess.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 1, 2014 at 08:48 UTC
In reply to:

Wahrsager: That's great news- Makes me feel a lot better about the company I've invested a lot in!

You feel a lot better about a company that ignored and brushed off customer concerns for over a year, and only did the right thing less than a week after they had a class action lawsuit filed against them?

Direct link | Posted on Feb 26, 2014 at 06:17 UTC
On Sony Cyber-shot RX10 Real-world Samples article (162 comments in total)
In reply to:

peevee1: All pictures look too flat. Maybe Sony tries to show off the dynamic range of the sensor which is higher than what you can from P&S and phones, but they've gone too far (just like Auto picture mode on Oly m43 cameras with Sony sensor - yeah, good DR, but just not contrasty enough - Normal looks great though).
I am sure contrast is right there in the settings - I am not so sure many buyers will bother to find it, and will just choose Canon with high contrast by default.

Oh please! It's a $1300 super zoom camera when the small sensor super zooms are $300 at Walmart and Amazon.

The people who would even think of dropping $1300 on this thing aren't going to be morons too stupid to figure out how to change contrast settings and "just choose Canon" because of some default setting.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 1, 2013 at 00:13 UTC

The Polaroid copied everything right down to the oily sensor issues. All it's missing is an inflated price tag. Somebody grab a rag!

Direct link | Posted on Oct 15, 2013 at 11:10 UTC as 58th comment
In reply to:

stuntmonkey: If there was any justice, the Pentax K-3 should get the lions share of the traffic today, not the D610 announcement.

Anastigmat has been crying about full frame since 2004. Those days back then were spent trying to convince the people on the forum that sub $1,000 full frame was easily doable (then) if only the manufacturer's weren't conspiring to keep them out of the hands of the consumers.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 10, 2013 at 06:23 UTC
In reply to:

GradyPhilpott: It seems to me that the only people who really have a complaint are those who bought a D600 and if those folks have only to send a faulty D600 in to a service center and get back what is basically a D610 without the badge, then I don't see that anyone has much to complain about.

There are no products that cannot have certain issues at the time of roll out, and beyond, and that is why there are warranties. That's why there are recalls.

I have to admit that since I got into photography I have been both appalled and amused at how ridiculous photo hobbyists can be with the "my camera brand is better than your camera brand" and what not.

I'm not going to defend the Nikon brand because I don't think that Nikon needs a defense.

There are names for those who refuse to live in the real world and have to whine about every little thing the corporate world does. Pick your favorite.

As for those who are completely bummed out, just move on to another camera brand. There's no shortage.

When did Nikon admit a problem with the D600 or issue a recall? They seem to spend as much time denying warranty repairs on the D600 shutter as much as they do on fixing them.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 10, 2013 at 06:07 UTC
On Olympus OM-D E-M1 Review preview (2066 comments in total)
In reply to:

photohounds: Ah, amnother poster who "thinks" less glass/metal means the lens is "worth" less.
They'll buy an f150 truck rather than a Ferrari because more metal for the money is "better".
Making excellent small things is harder and costs MORE, not less.

Some people appreciate the price of everything and the value of nothing.

More compact cameras often translate into more/better photo opportunities.

Agree, Nuno, I don't hang around the CaNikon forums either. Too busy enjoying my camera.

These cross brand whiners are a very sad lot and it must be very depressing in CaNikon land for them to enjoy spending so much time here ....

Why do people care? Precision corrected optical glass costs a lot more than running a picture through a math equation. If they're going that route, they should price their junk lenses accordingly. Remember, software correction isn't "free". They degrade the image in some way, be it resolution, noise, or some other form.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 16, 2013 at 18:31 UTC
On Olympus OM-D E-M1 Review preview (2066 comments in total)
In reply to:

photohounds: Ah, amnother poster who "thinks" less glass/metal means the lens is "worth" less.
They'll buy an f150 truck rather than a Ferrari because more metal for the money is "better".
Making excellent small things is harder and costs MORE, not less.

Some people appreciate the price of everything and the value of nothing.

More compact cameras often translate into more/better photo opportunities.

Agree, Nuno, I don't hang around the CaNikon forums either. Too busy enjoying my camera.

These cross brand whiners are a very sad lot and it must be very depressing in CaNikon land for them to enjoy spending so much time here ....

That must be why the lens cap is so expensive and the hood isn't included.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 16, 2013 at 09:33 UTC

So this is Nikon's take on Canon's PowerShot N? Do these two "competitors" do anything other than copy the "innovations" coming from the other?

Direct link | Posted on Sep 6, 2013 at 07:55 UTC as 12th comment | 1 reply

From Nikon site
---
Brightness: Approx 130 lux/65 lux at 3.3 feet (1 meter) selected with switch
Beam Pattern: Circular, 72 degrees, up down, left, right
Illumination Duration: 30 minutes
Powered By: Four (4) AAA batteries (alkaline, lithium or Ni-MH)

No mention of lumen or CRI ratings.

You may as well buy any of the high end AA flood flashlights/headlamps on the market and just attach those to the shoe via a holder or magnet. Cheaper, lighter, longer lasting and not a huge pain in the ass when you need to change batteries.

P.S. No word on whether this is made in China or Japan. (LOL)

Direct link | Posted on Sep 6, 2013 at 07:51 UTC as 4th comment | 2 replies
On Ricoh announces 'HD' update to Pentax DA Limited primes article (192 comments in total)

Quick! Everybody dump their old out of date lenses on Ebay now!

Direct link | Posted on Aug 27, 2013 at 22:29 UTC as 69th comment | 2 replies

It's better than nothing but LED will always be inferior to xenon tubes until the spectrum issues are solved.

Direct link | Posted on May 16, 2013 at 20:58 UTC as 16th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

Jimmy jang Boo: $900? Even if it were $200 I'd pass. I waited a long time hoping to see just one real FW update that would address some of the simple quirks that cripple the V1. It ain't gonna happen. From my perspective Nikon doesn't believe their products or customers have any value after the sale. Going forward I'll pass on all things Nikon.

A friend of mine learned that first hand when Nikon never bothered to update some of their older SD-based DSLR's to support SDHC. I found that odd because the perpetually-on-the-verge-of-bankruptcy company that made my DSLR added SDHC support via firmware update. It never occurred to me that a big company like Nikon would leave their own customers hanging like that.

Direct link | Posted on May 14, 2013 at 08:57 UTC
In reply to:

iamphil: The entire software industry has been salivating for years to move to subscription models. New versions of mature products like Photoshop and Office add very little in terms of actual value, so many people are perfectly willing to sit on older versions that get the job done.

Software vendors like Microsoft and Adobe hate that because it is not good for company revenues and as such have come out with schemes to extract rent from customers to fluff the numbers.

Other software vendors have tried other tactics to force potential customers to pay up more. Attempting to restrict second hand sales for example through activation schemes or illegal EULA terms. The prevailing attitude of many C-level execs is that if you're buying used you are stealing money from them.

It's all the more reason to pull copyright in the U.S. back to the original 14 years to give a kick in the pants of businesses that have become too reliant on sucking on the teet of their government granted monopoly privileges.

I presume you're talking about things like site licenses? Sure but mom and pop operations and independent photographers typically don't have need for such things.

Now the little fish get to swim with the big fish.

Direct link | Posted on May 9, 2013 at 00:50 UTC
In reply to:

raincoat: OK, maybe if copyrights don't keep getting extended to 1mill years after author's death, you wouldn't need this orphan works stuff.

Then if you really need an image, then either
1) you can pay someone to make it
2) it's been out there for over 100yrs, reasonably assume it's out of copyright

Yes I'm looking at you Mickey Mouse.

But think of Walt! Think of his kids! They would starve if they had to sit around doing nothing while being unable to collect rent from something daddy did 80 years ago!

Direct link | Posted on May 9, 2013 at 00:42 UTC
In reply to:

Danamr: Seriously.
Adobe is not a non-profit.
Adobe is not a charity.
Adobe does not owe you anything.
They are in business to make money. Software piracy costs them millions of dollars a year. This goes a long way to eliminating that.
Their pricing model is more than fair for what you get.
This is the future. Get used to it.

There's an odd thing I've seen in many posts across the internet is various blogs that have put up postings about DRM and similar items.

"This is the future, get used to it" is a comment that I see repeated a lot in said postings.

It makes me wonder.

Direct link | Posted on May 9, 2013 at 00:38 UTC

Copyright laws that benefit large multi-national corporations at the expense of others? Say it ain't so...

Direct link | Posted on May 9, 2013 at 00:31 UTC as 28th comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

RichRMA: Welcome to the new U.S. rental/service economy. Where the powers that be control the physical media and can pull it or change it any time, depending on which way the winds of politics, morality or business are blowing. This pertains to movies, music, software and whatever else they can create with ones and zeros. Personal ownership is the enemy of the current administration and business.

If copyright terms were reasonable (e.g. 5-10 years) instead of the ludicrous 75+ year monsters today, rent-seeking as an industry would not be nearly as lucrative. Businesses would be forced to innovate in short order or die.

However copyright maximalists and others have become too dependent on sucking on the teet of The People to give it up without a big fight.

With the help of politicians they've been stealing from the public domain for 50 years and it shows no signs of ending. These people have a lot of money and they're not shy about spending it on protection.

Direct link | Posted on May 8, 2013 at 23:54 UTC
Total: 45, showing: 1 – 20
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