MonoSynth

MonoSynth

Lives in Netherlands Zwolle, Netherlands
Works as a Software developer (healthcare)
Has a website at www.bartkuik.nl
Joined on Oct 26, 2006

Comments

Total: 6, showing: 1 – 6
On Samsung NX1 First Impressions Review preview (787 comments in total)

Right now, there are serious mirrorless cameras from every manufacturer except Nikon and Canon. With decent EVF's and on-sensor phase detection AF, those flipping mirrors and bulky pentaprisms start to lose their advantage and a dSLR starts to look old-fashioned.

With an EVF I can:
- See exactly what the sensor sees, no focusing screen calibration needed;
- Zoom in to precisely focus my f/1.2 lenses;
- See the result of the white balance settings;
- See DoF instantly;
- Dial in every possible overlay, including focus peaking, zebra and histogram;

Lens manufacturers are freed from the burdens of flange focal distance and automatic diaphragms, resulting in more compact lenses and more diaphragm blades (better bokeh).

There are some fields where an OVF has an advantage (fast sports), but those problems will soon be solved too.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 15, 2014 at 10:30 UTC as 199th comment | 3 replies
On Using third-party lenses on Sony Cyber-shot a7 / a7R article (495 comments in total)
In reply to:

groucher: I'm really interested in this camera and was planning to use my ancient Nikon glass on it but I'm totally confused by this article. When using old glass with my D800, I put the camera in full manual mode and use the focus indicator. This is incredibly easy, particularly as the focus indicator is far more accurate than the old split screen method.

Is it that case that the A7's automation prevents a similar method to be used i.e. does automation get in the way? I'm particularly bothered by the use of focus magnification which seems to be an incredibly slow and error prone process, although I have no experience of using it.

I really like this camera for manual shooting. Focus magnification is just a double push of a button away, touching the shutter button disables it. Moving the focusing rectangle around is too much of a hassle, but you don't really need it.

Focus peaking is okay for slower lenses. The EVF is sharp enough to judge focus unless you shoot with f/2 or lower.

I use the camera as a light sealed box with a sensor, a shutter and a light meter and it serves me well.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 22, 2014 at 09:07 UTC
On Using third-party lenses on Sony Cyber-shot a7 / a7R article (495 comments in total)

I'm very, very happy with my A7 combined with my Hexanon AR 57mm f/1.2, same version as in the article. Mine seems to be a good copy, sharper wide open than most of the pics I see online.

Focusing is tricky, but after using it for more than two years (first on my NEX3/5) I'm getting used to it. The slightest movement of my body can cause the eyes to get out of focus (while the eyebrows or the cheeks are razor sharp). The trickyness is what drives me.

Some examples from a retro gaming event last saturday. All wide open@1/60 with Auto ISO (mostly ISO5000 or ISO6400): http://www.flickr.com/photos/lostintheforest/sets/72157640032795904/

Direct link | Posted on Jan 22, 2014 at 07:21 UTC as 106th comment
In reply to:

the reason: So let me get this straight...
If I wanted this camera with the evf, the lens hood, a carrying case, and a (needed) 2 stop nd filter Id need 3900$? And some of you are ok with this??!! That borders on brain damage.
Anything you have to compare with a leica M to justify it is ridiculously overpriced to begin with.
I dont care if your 30 year old rollei only did 1/500 of a sec, I care that its 2012 and you wanna charge me that much for 1/2000 of a sec.
It amazes me how hard some of you are trying to justify this thing...

Please show me a camera with a leaf shutter that can go faster than 1/2000s. As far as I know, they don't exist. At all. 1/2000 is crazy fast for this type of shutter.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 4, 2012 at 07:29 UTC
On Photokina 2012 Roundup article (102 comments in total)
In reply to:

Shamael: The RX1 had everyone talking. Look at all comments and you get the point. A camera with FF, 35 mm huge lens, 1/2000 fastest speed, in some way a useless wonder in technology. But, there it ends. Let's not talk about the price. In sight of the quality and make of the lens only, the price is rather cheap. But, if Sony had done this with a retractable zoom, in the 20-50 range and a 4000th speed, a 1500$ pricing, this camera had sold like hell. Not to speak about what had been with ILS.

Let us not ask why Sony has gone that way, making a niche product? It will remain a mystery anyway. Let us just hope that it is an announcer for what many of us wait for. If I consider the price of the lens, the RX1 body is worth 5$.

As far as I can tell it's the fastest leaf shutter *ever*. Even Leica's S lenses with built-in leaf shutters don't go faster than 1/1000s. Most leaf shutters max out at 1/500s.

There were reasons to include a leaf shutter instead of a focal plane shutter:
- Silent;
- Flash sync across the whole range (try to find a dSLR with 1/2000s sync);
- The huge rear element of the lens almost touches the sensor, leaving no room for a focal plane shutter.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 27, 2012 at 07:09 UTC
In reply to:

codeNsnap: Too bad this converter cannot be used with the new X series 14mm f/2.8-
http://www.fujifilm.com/products/digital_cameras/accessories/lens/conversionlens/x100wideconversionlens/index.html

A good converter is an extension of one specific lens design. Generic converters don't offer decent quality.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 26, 2012 at 09:41 UTC
Total: 6, showing: 1 – 6