Dan Tong

Dan Tong

Lives in United States Chicago, United States
Works as a Computer Consultant, Photographer
Joined on Jan 3, 2003
About me:

Olympus 2100UZ
Minolta Dimage 7i
Canon S400
Canon EOS 300D

Comments

Total: 156, showing: 81 – 100
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This is very interesting and practically useful. Good Standards make it far easier to make intelligent comparisons and choices.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 10, 2012 at 04:54 UTC as 12th comment
On Quick Review: Apple iPhone 5 Camera article (119 comments in total)

What does the X-axis represent in the graph:

MOST POPULAR CAMERAS in FLICKR COMMUNITY

Surely it must be time, but what units?

Please avoid this common mistake of not giving us the most basic and must have information to really understand what information is presented.

Thanks,

Dan

Direct link | Posted on Oct 2, 2012 at 22:37 UTC as 23rd comment | 2 replies
On Photokina 2012: Interview - Dirk Jasper of Nikon article (220 comments in total)
In reply to:

BeanyPic: Here's the perfect DPR commentators camera - A 101 Mps FF sensor, 551 all cross type focusing points, 25 FPS, 4K at 350FPS, full built in audio control, Full titanium body with full water proofing, 500% VF and a 10 inch LCD screen and ISO which goes to 1,000,000 without any digital noise All for £100.

The problem is we live in the real world, not the fantasy world most people who comment here live in....

Oops you forgot to say that is it pocket size with an LCD screen that scrolls open for fully articulated 5" HD res display.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 24, 2012 at 21:47 UTC
On Photokina 2012: Interview - Dirk Jasper of Nikon article (220 comments in total)
In reply to:

stromaroma: Looks like a nice camera but I probably won't buy it. I have a D300 and D7000 and no need for FX. The D400 may interest me though, for wildlife. My D300 is so loud it scares away wildlife, that's gotta change. Plus video would be nice.

What I am disappointed about with Nikon though is its entry level approach to the N1 series. As a rep in Britain said months ago, "We want enthusiasts and pros to be buying our DSLR's". Well Nikon, why don't you give your customers what they want instead of telling them what they want? Has it not occurred to you that many pro's don't want to lug around DSLR's all the time?

"Many of us are travel photographers and we want small, small, small! We want DSLR performance minus the mirror and large sensor, it's that simple."

Try Prayer to overcome the laws of physics : )

Direct link | Posted on Sep 24, 2012 at 21:43 UTC
On Photokina 2012: Interview - Dirk Jasper of Nikon article (220 comments in total)

How refreshing to read an interview in which the company representative gives honest, non B.S. answers, does not denigrate the competition, and says he does not know, when in fact he has no answers.

Great interview and interviewee!

I've got all Canon equipment, but have utmost respect and admiration for Nikon's impressive innovations which includes backwards compatibility (use of APS-C lenses with FX sensor cameras) and serious attention paid to the customer's point of view.

Were I starting to buy equipment I would, at this point, start with Nikon.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 24, 2012 at 21:38 UTC as 10th comment | 1 reply
On Canon Powershot G15 Preview preview (246 comments in total)
In reply to:

Dan Tong: Without the articulated LCD screen, I have absolutely no intention to move from my G12 to the G15 in spite of the faster lens. I also very much dislike the loss of the ISO wheel. I consider these moves on Canon's part to be incredibly dumb. The G12 is already too large to be truly pocket size, so sacrificing the articulated LCD screen to save size and weight is totally useless, at least for me. The ability to change the ISO with external wheel was very, very useful. In fact it was the combination of easy and quick to use external controls which made the G12 so interesting to serious photographers.

At this point Sony, Fuji, Nikon, Olympus (esp RX-100, Fuji XF-1 ) have far more interesting cameras to serve as upgrades for my G12 as far as I am concerned.

Continued:

Continued:

For someone, who has invested extensively in some very fine Canon equipment, I must say I am terribly disappointed by Canon's more recent product decisions and pricing, but the fact that the G15 comes w a fixed LCD screen is one of the biggest.

Had Canon asked on DPreview, I am sure the overwhelming vote would have been to keep it.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 23, 2012 at 23:26 UTC
On Canon Powershot G15 Preview preview (246 comments in total)

Without the articulated LCD screen, I have absolutely no intention to move from my G12 to the G15 in spite of the faster lens. I also very much dislike the loss of the ISO wheel. I consider these moves on Canon's part to be incredibly dumb. The G12 is already too large to be truly pocket size, so sacrificing the articulated LCD screen to save size and weight is totally useless, at least for me. The ability to change the ISO with external wheel was very, very useful. In fact it was the combination of easy and quick to use external controls which made the G12 so interesting to serious photographers.

At this point Sony, Fuji, Nikon, Olympus (esp RX-100, Fuji XF-1 ) have far more interesting cameras to serve as upgrades for my G12 as far as I am concerned.

Continued:

Direct link | Posted on Sep 23, 2012 at 23:15 UTC as 48th comment | 2 replies
On Fujifilm XF1 Preview preview (129 comments in total)

Congratulations to Fuji for making such a cute but capable pocketable camera. In comparison to my Canon S85, this is heaven. In fact even compared to the newest Canon S100, it looks really good for the more serious photographer.

For manual mode we have 2 dials, so you can use one for Aperture and the other for Shutter Speed. Obviously Fuji, knows what photographers want when they spend a bit more money for a really portable pocket camera. The 2/3" sensor size is really very nice. My old first serious digital camera was a 2/3" sensor Minolta and the portraits and flower closeups taken with it still look pretty good. My Canon G12, and 5D Mk II would not be ashamed to sit alongside this Fuji, although the G12 would certainly suffer in comparison.

Both the Sony RX-100 and this Fuji (as other company's offerrings) bring a lot more to the table than Canon. I hate to say this, but I am disappointed by Canon's more recent lack of innovative leadership.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 20, 2012 at 00:55 UTC as 38th comment
On Canon EOS 6D preview (1035 comments in total)
In reply to:

Dan Tong: There is no question that with just about any of the new cameras from Canon, Nikon, Sony, Pentax, Fuji, Sigma etc. it is much easier to take really good photos than at any other time in the past. In fact, this true even with the kit lenses.

However, under some difficult conditions whether, poor lighting, fast moving subjects, tough environments (extreme cold or heat, moisture, extreme vibration, the capabilities of the camera (as a tool), may become extremely important. So too does the weight of the camera and lenses when you must carry everything that you need on your back, on foot away from any other mode of transportation.

Continued:

3 Continued:

Also, with the amazing improvement in overall picture quality obtainable at lower and lower cost, we expect continuous improvement in the new models that are announced. It is therefore not surprising that many of us may be disappointed when a new model is announced with specs that do not come up to our "realistic" expectations, given what the competition sells for around the same price.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 19, 2012 at 21:34 UTC
On Canon EOS 6D preview (1035 comments in total)
In reply to:

Dan Tong: There is no question that with just about any of the new cameras from Canon, Nikon, Sony, Pentax, Fuji, Sigma etc. it is much easier to take really good photos than at any other time in the past. In fact, this true even with the kit lenses.

However, under some difficult conditions whether, poor lighting, fast moving subjects, tough environments (extreme cold or heat, moisture, extreme vibration, the capabilities of the camera (as a tool), may become extremely important. So too does the weight of the camera and lenses when you must carry everything that you need on your back, on foot away from any other mode of transportation.

Continued:

2 Continued:

If you only shoot landscape under excellent daylight conditions, or in a studio where you have full control over lighting and lots of time to focus as precisely as you wish with a model who sits or stands still, then just about any camera will work very nicely.

If you photograph under a wide variety of conditions and subjects then you will want a tool such as a camera, that will also meet the more challenging conditions such as a basketball game in a poorly lit gym.

That's why some photographers want the best camera they can get for the money -because it will not let them down when the going gets tough. So this is the answer to the constant business of "

it's the shooter not the camera stupid!"

We all agree that this is true artistically, but artists do use tools, and tools differ. Some are more versatile than others.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 19, 2012 at 21:32 UTC
On Canon EOS 6D preview (1035 comments in total)

There is no question that with just about any of the new cameras from Canon, Nikon, Sony, Pentax, Fuji, Sigma etc. it is much easier to take really good photos than at any other time in the past. In fact, this true even with the kit lenses.

However, under some difficult conditions whether, poor lighting, fast moving subjects, tough environments (extreme cold or heat, moisture, extreme vibration, the capabilities of the camera (as a tool), may become extremely important. So too does the weight of the camera and lenses when you must carry everything that you need on your back, on foot away from any other mode of transportation.

Continued:

Direct link | Posted on Sep 19, 2012 at 21:31 UTC as 191st comment | 3 replies
On Canon EOS 6D preview (1035 comments in total)
In reply to:

Gothmoth: Nikon’s recently released consumer-oriented full-frame sensor DSLR, the D600, has just gone through DxOMark’s image quality evaluation tests. And the verdict is in: the D600 is an affordable camera that places a high premium on image quality, as it ranks just behind the top performing Nikon D800 and Nikon D800E. It is also a significant improvement over the high-end professional flagship DSLRs, the Nikon D3X and the Nikon D4. Here are the DxOMark test results for the D600.

http://www.dxomark.com/index.php/Publications/DxOMark-Reviews/Nikon-D600-sets-high-bar-for-sensor-image-quality

Thanks for the link. Based on these comparisons, there is no question that Nikon is ahead of Canon with respect to technical innovation (superior sensor). I say this enviously as the owner of lots of Canon glass and 5D, 5D Mk II etc. Were I to start today I would choose a Nikon.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 19, 2012 at 20:49 UTC
On Canon EOS 6D preview (1035 comments in total)
In reply to:

fanderso3: to Alberto,
" Also can't use the lenses for the market of the aps-c cameras......another betrayal from Canon."
that's not betrayel...NONE of the full frame cameras can use the aps-c (EF-S) lenses, but all aps-c cameras can use the EF-S as well as the EF lenses.

You are correct as far as Canon dSLRs but Nikon has been a lot more thoughtful and customers really appreciate that APS-C lenses work with Nikon full frame sensor dSLRs. Another reason for us Canon owners (5D Mk II etc.) to feel envious of Nikon's far more innovative designs.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 19, 2012 at 20:33 UTC
On Canon Powershot G15 Preview preview (246 comments in total)

I own a Canon G12, 5D Mark II, lenses etc and although the faster lens of the G15 would be wonderful to have, the lack of the swiveling LCD screen is a serious drawback and a really dumb step by Canon.

I am far more likely to choose the Sony RX100, not only for its much larger sensor, smaller packaging, and far better video features. There's real innovation for you.

It appears that Canon, relative to the competition (Nikon, Sony, Panasonic, Fuji and others), has not made any serious innovations since the introduction of the 5D, and the 5D Mark II. The newer models represent incremental improvements, and as good and as desireable as they are are, like the improved AF in the 5D Mark III, these are simply features borrowed from other existing Canon lines.

The early history of the G series, which I was not aware of, shows a lack of common sense - taking away some of the best features, then gradually adding them back in only to take some away once again with the G15.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 17, 2012 at 20:32 UTC as 81st comment | 2 replies
On Sony NEX-6 Hands-on Preview preview (229 comments in total)

The NEX-6 would be great but for video purposes, my main interest for the NEX series, except for the lack of touch screen controls. It looks like the NEX-5R would better suit my purposes.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 13, 2012 at 04:28 UTC as 67th comment
On Just Posted: Sony Alpha NEX-5R hands-on preview article (127 comments in total)
In reply to:

xoio: More crappy 'wave the camera around - Iphone Style' rubbish.

King Penguin is absolutely correct. I have used the the "tight strap" method for video using a Canon 5D Mark II with 70-200mm /F4 lens plus 2x telephoto adapter, and the video is very steady, with slow panning (from the torso). It would have been simpler with a tripod (and even better) but shooting conditions (shooting road construction out of window) made tripod use impractical. The problem with the "tight strap" method is that, on the5D Mark II, pressing the start and stop button was nearly impossible without jiggling the camera.
Of course a viewfinder that attaches to the LCD would have been better, but I did not have one.

In case no one has noticed, the strap attachment geometry of the NEX-5R has been greatly improved!

In summary, I highly recommend the "tight strap" method for shooting using LCD with any camera.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 30, 2012 at 22:57 UTC
On Sony Alpha NEX-5R preview (145 comments in total)

This is a nice follow up to the 5N. Can the flash accessory port be used with external flash, or any wireless flash controllers (other than Sony) ? For video purposes it's too bad there is no 720p video resolution, and of course we're all hoping that the hybrid focus system lives up to our expectations.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 30, 2012 at 22:03 UTC as 18th comment

More proof that a large percentage of DPreview commentators cannot even read. This excellent article answers just about all of the questions, dumb or otherwise, raised in a prior article about Curiosity's cameras, yet lots of fools still keep asking the same tiresome questions. In fact, many of the questions were already correctly guessed, and it is a testament to the fact that there is a small intelligent, well informed segment in the Dpreview community.

Thanks for the excellent interview and CONGRATULATIONS to all of the people at NASA, JPL, and other places all over the world whose intelligence and hard work has made this possible.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 9, 2012 at 21:50 UTC as 33rd comment
In reply to:

cpkuntz: Why do they use 2 mp sensors? Robust build? The Apollo mission used Hasselblads. Why not get some medium format goodness on board one of these rovers?

Correction to my post:

At the time of the landing I heard or read 13 minutes (one way), so that is probably for the distance during the landing.. Just now I learned it varies between 4.3 and 21 minutes depending on the min or max Earth to Mars distance.

http://www.physlink.com/education/askexperts/ae381.cfm

Direct link | Posted on Aug 8, 2012 at 06:57 UTC
In reply to:

CameraLabTester: The whole Mars landing is quite an amazing triumph considering it takes at least 6 minutes for any command on Earth to be confirmed. (3 minutes send, 3 minutes echo).

Just like in the Apollo missions, future landers will carry much better equipment.

NASA will eventually be infected with camera upgrade fever.

.

Radio waves travel at lightspeed, so the 45 minutes does not make sense. Most likely the reporter got it screwed up (as usual).

http://www.haydenplanetarium.org/universe/duguide/app_light_travel_time_dista.php

Look at Table A-2 which says:

Mars is 12.7 light minutes away. This is where the 13 minute delay I got from the NASA boadcast during the landing. But that's probably right now, which may be a sort of average distance (in between the shortest and longest perhaps).

This link shows that you are correct:

http://www.physlink.com/education/askexperts/ae381.cfm

The time varies between 4.3 and 21 minutes, and the 45 minutes then is pretty close to the round trip of 21 minutes each way. Voila mystery solved!

Thanks, CameraLab Tester!

Direct link | Posted on Aug 8, 2012 at 06:50 UTC
Total: 156, showing: 81 – 100
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