Dan Tong

Dan Tong

Lives in United States Chicago, United States
Works as a Computer Consultant, Photographer
Joined on Jan 3, 2003
About me:

Olympus 2100UZ
Minolta Dimage 7i
Canon S400
Canon EOS 300D

Comments

Total: 163, showing: 81 – 100
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A truly creative image. It's great to have the story of how it was done. I also enjoyed his comment on how it reflects the difference between the Powered (or Powerful) and the Powerless.

The more I look at this image, the more I appreciate it the angle of view, so dependent on the height, the framing angle (focal length & distance), the color tone, etc. Clearly you will not find an image like this on microstock : )

Iwan Baan is one photographer who, based on this example of his work, well deserves his success.

Thanks,

Dan

Direct link | Posted on Nov 5, 2012 at 23:26 UTC as 15th comment | 3 replies
On Adobe Photoshop CS6 for Photographers article (54 comments in total)

I have an earlier version of Martin Evening's book (CS4 I think) and although chuck full of detail, a lot of new features are really far better served with video tutorials, even though for review a written summary is better than having to search through a video. I note that on-line materials, available to purchasers, include video tutorials, but have no idea how much.

I have been really impressed with the CS6 tutorials found on lynda.com, which costs $25 per month, or less if you get a longer period of subscription. I found a ton of material that I did not know about and found very valuable. There are free video's that you can try in each section, so you can judge for yourself.

At this point I find I get a much more out of video tutorials than when I simply read information on a page with anything that is a bit more complicated than the very simple stuff.

Dan

Direct link | Posted on Nov 5, 2012 at 03:47 UTC as 23rd comment

The modularity is a really important feature too which, as far as I know, only RED was pushing at these price ranges ($15k and under).

Direct link | Posted on Oct 31, 2012 at 01:03 UTC as 29th comment | 1 reply
On A Serious Rangefinder Compact Camera article (137 comments in total)

Easycass,

Nicely done with some great ideas.

Thanks,

Dan

Direct link | Posted on Oct 22, 2012 at 22:16 UTC as 12th comment
On Announcing connect.dpreview.com article (250 comments in total)
In reply to:

Isca: The snobbery of the "real" photographers using "real" cameras is astounding. The best camera is the one that you have with you, ever heard that phrase before? I've been shooting a photo a day for 6 weeks, many times when the other 3 "real" cameras are at home. The iPhone forces me to look at subjects differently so I welcome this refreshing direction that dept has taken (this post typed on my Canon 5D Mk 2).

Re: Wetsleet

I think larrytusaz makes some good points, eve though your point is well taken.

Ever talk to real chefs? You could not take their "tools" away from them without a fight. They have their favorite knives, pots and pans, blenders, etc.

The rational view is that both GOOD EQUIPMENTt and TALENT are necessary. You don't need the world's newest and fanciest equipment if you have talent, but some achievements will be out of reach with inadequate, crappy tools, just as without real talent the world's best tools will not help the un-talented create anything really worth discussing.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 11, 2012 at 04:06 UTC
On Announcing connect.dpreview.com article (250 comments in total)

Interesting but disappointing tablet review!

The Specs fail to include connectivity (hdmi, usb, plugin storage upgrade type and max capacity). These things need to be spelled out clearly including for example if hdmi port is standard or micro etc.

It is not difficult to collect this information -although in rare cases, sometimes manufacturers web sites, may to some extent hide this information. However, any reviewer who actually has hands on access simply needs to look at the product. Is the reader supposed to run around and waste time to collect this information?

I'm afraid this is the kind of inexcusable oversight that you see in the typical advertisements or specs on "know very little" print and web ads and catalogue pages.

Anyone who would like to upgrade storage, or would like to connect an dSLR or some other camera needs to know this information.

I would therefore downgrade these reviews, regardless of the rest of the review quality and thoroughness.

Dan

Direct link | Posted on Oct 11, 2012 at 03:59 UTC as 29th comment | 2 replies

The Specs fail to include connectivity (hdmi, usb, plugin storage upgrade type and max capacity). These things need to be spelled out clearly including for example if hdmi port is standard or micro etc.

It is not difficult to collect this information -although in rare cases, sometimes manufacturers web sites, may to some extent hide this information. However, any reviewer who actually has hands on access simply needs to look at the product. Is the reader supposed to run around and waste time to collect this information?

I'm afraid this is the kind of inexcusable oversight that you see in the typical advertisements or specs on "know very little" print and web ads and catalogue pages.

Anyone who would like to upgrade storage, or would like to connect an dSLR or some other camera needs to know this information.

I would therefore downgrade these reviews, regardless of the rest of the review quality and thoroughness.

Dan

Direct link | Posted on Oct 11, 2012 at 03:08 UTC as 90th comment | 1 reply

This is very interesting and practically useful. Good Standards make it far easier to make intelligent comparisons and choices.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 10, 2012 at 04:54 UTC as 12th comment
On Quick Review: Apple iPhone 5 Camera article (119 comments in total)

What does the X-axis represent in the graph:

MOST POPULAR CAMERAS in FLICKR COMMUNITY

Surely it must be time, but what units?

Please avoid this common mistake of not giving us the most basic and must have information to really understand what information is presented.

Thanks,

Dan

Direct link | Posted on Oct 2, 2012 at 22:37 UTC as 23rd comment | 2 replies
On Photokina 2012: Interview - Dirk Jasper of Nikon article (220 comments in total)
In reply to:

BeanyPic: Here's the perfect DPR commentators camera - A 101 Mps FF sensor, 551 all cross type focusing points, 25 FPS, 4K at 350FPS, full built in audio control, Full titanium body with full water proofing, 500% VF and a 10 inch LCD screen and ISO which goes to 1,000,000 without any digital noise All for £100.

The problem is we live in the real world, not the fantasy world most people who comment here live in....

Oops you forgot to say that is it pocket size with an LCD screen that scrolls open for fully articulated 5" HD res display.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 24, 2012 at 21:47 UTC
On Photokina 2012: Interview - Dirk Jasper of Nikon article (220 comments in total)
In reply to:

stromaroma: Looks like a nice camera but I probably won't buy it. I have a D300 and D7000 and no need for FX. The D400 may interest me though, for wildlife. My D300 is so loud it scares away wildlife, that's gotta change. Plus video would be nice.

What I am disappointed about with Nikon though is its entry level approach to the N1 series. As a rep in Britain said months ago, "We want enthusiasts and pros to be buying our DSLR's". Well Nikon, why don't you give your customers what they want instead of telling them what they want? Has it not occurred to you that many pro's don't want to lug around DSLR's all the time?

"Many of us are travel photographers and we want small, small, small! We want DSLR performance minus the mirror and large sensor, it's that simple."

Try Prayer to overcome the laws of physics : )

Direct link | Posted on Sep 24, 2012 at 21:43 UTC
On Photokina 2012: Interview - Dirk Jasper of Nikon article (220 comments in total)

How refreshing to read an interview in which the company representative gives honest, non B.S. answers, does not denigrate the competition, and says he does not know, when in fact he has no answers.

Great interview and interviewee!

I've got all Canon equipment, but have utmost respect and admiration for Nikon's impressive innovations which includes backwards compatibility (use of APS-C lenses with FX sensor cameras) and serious attention paid to the customer's point of view.

Were I starting to buy equipment I would, at this point, start with Nikon.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 24, 2012 at 21:38 UTC as 10th comment | 1 reply
On Canon Powershot G15 Preview preview (246 comments in total)
In reply to:

Dan Tong: Without the articulated LCD screen, I have absolutely no intention to move from my G12 to the G15 in spite of the faster lens. I also very much dislike the loss of the ISO wheel. I consider these moves on Canon's part to be incredibly dumb. The G12 is already too large to be truly pocket size, so sacrificing the articulated LCD screen to save size and weight is totally useless, at least for me. The ability to change the ISO with external wheel was very, very useful. In fact it was the combination of easy and quick to use external controls which made the G12 so interesting to serious photographers.

At this point Sony, Fuji, Nikon, Olympus (esp RX-100, Fuji XF-1 ) have far more interesting cameras to serve as upgrades for my G12 as far as I am concerned.

Continued:

Continued:

For someone, who has invested extensively in some very fine Canon equipment, I must say I am terribly disappointed by Canon's more recent product decisions and pricing, but the fact that the G15 comes w a fixed LCD screen is one of the biggest.

Had Canon asked on DPreview, I am sure the overwhelming vote would have been to keep it.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 23, 2012 at 23:26 UTC
On Canon Powershot G15 Preview preview (246 comments in total)

Without the articulated LCD screen, I have absolutely no intention to move from my G12 to the G15 in spite of the faster lens. I also very much dislike the loss of the ISO wheel. I consider these moves on Canon's part to be incredibly dumb. The G12 is already too large to be truly pocket size, so sacrificing the articulated LCD screen to save size and weight is totally useless, at least for me. The ability to change the ISO with external wheel was very, very useful. In fact it was the combination of easy and quick to use external controls which made the G12 so interesting to serious photographers.

At this point Sony, Fuji, Nikon, Olympus (esp RX-100, Fuji XF-1 ) have far more interesting cameras to serve as upgrades for my G12 as far as I am concerned.

Continued:

Direct link | Posted on Sep 23, 2012 at 23:15 UTC as 48th comment | 2 replies
On Fujifilm XF1 Preview preview (129 comments in total)

Congratulations to Fuji for making such a cute but capable pocketable camera. In comparison to my Canon S85, this is heaven. In fact even compared to the newest Canon S100, it looks really good for the more serious photographer.

For manual mode we have 2 dials, so you can use one for Aperture and the other for Shutter Speed. Obviously Fuji, knows what photographers want when they spend a bit more money for a really portable pocket camera. The 2/3" sensor size is really very nice. My old first serious digital camera was a 2/3" sensor Minolta and the portraits and flower closeups taken with it still look pretty good. My Canon G12, and 5D Mk II would not be ashamed to sit alongside this Fuji, although the G12 would certainly suffer in comparison.

Both the Sony RX-100 and this Fuji (as other company's offerrings) bring a lot more to the table than Canon. I hate to say this, but I am disappointed by Canon's more recent lack of innovative leadership.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 20, 2012 at 00:55 UTC as 38th comment
On Canon EOS 6D preview (1035 comments in total)
In reply to:

Dan Tong: There is no question that with just about any of the new cameras from Canon, Nikon, Sony, Pentax, Fuji, Sigma etc. it is much easier to take really good photos than at any other time in the past. In fact, this true even with the kit lenses.

However, under some difficult conditions whether, poor lighting, fast moving subjects, tough environments (extreme cold or heat, moisture, extreme vibration, the capabilities of the camera (as a tool), may become extremely important. So too does the weight of the camera and lenses when you must carry everything that you need on your back, on foot away from any other mode of transportation.

Continued:

3 Continued:

Also, with the amazing improvement in overall picture quality obtainable at lower and lower cost, we expect continuous improvement in the new models that are announced. It is therefore not surprising that many of us may be disappointed when a new model is announced with specs that do not come up to our "realistic" expectations, given what the competition sells for around the same price.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 19, 2012 at 21:34 UTC
On Canon EOS 6D preview (1035 comments in total)
In reply to:

Dan Tong: There is no question that with just about any of the new cameras from Canon, Nikon, Sony, Pentax, Fuji, Sigma etc. it is much easier to take really good photos than at any other time in the past. In fact, this true even with the kit lenses.

However, under some difficult conditions whether, poor lighting, fast moving subjects, tough environments (extreme cold or heat, moisture, extreme vibration, the capabilities of the camera (as a tool), may become extremely important. So too does the weight of the camera and lenses when you must carry everything that you need on your back, on foot away from any other mode of transportation.

Continued:

2 Continued:

If you only shoot landscape under excellent daylight conditions, or in a studio where you have full control over lighting and lots of time to focus as precisely as you wish with a model who sits or stands still, then just about any camera will work very nicely.

If you photograph under a wide variety of conditions and subjects then you will want a tool such as a camera, that will also meet the more challenging conditions such as a basketball game in a poorly lit gym.

That's why some photographers want the best camera they can get for the money -because it will not let them down when the going gets tough. So this is the answer to the constant business of "

it's the shooter not the camera stupid!"

We all agree that this is true artistically, but artists do use tools, and tools differ. Some are more versatile than others.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 19, 2012 at 21:32 UTC
On Canon EOS 6D preview (1035 comments in total)

There is no question that with just about any of the new cameras from Canon, Nikon, Sony, Pentax, Fuji, Sigma etc. it is much easier to take really good photos than at any other time in the past. In fact, this true even with the kit lenses.

However, under some difficult conditions whether, poor lighting, fast moving subjects, tough environments (extreme cold or heat, moisture, extreme vibration, the capabilities of the camera (as a tool), may become extremely important. So too does the weight of the camera and lenses when you must carry everything that you need on your back, on foot away from any other mode of transportation.

Continued:

Direct link | Posted on Sep 19, 2012 at 21:31 UTC as 191st comment | 3 replies
On Canon EOS 6D preview (1035 comments in total)
In reply to:

Gothmoth: Nikon’s recently released consumer-oriented full-frame sensor DSLR, the D600, has just gone through DxOMark’s image quality evaluation tests. And the verdict is in: the D600 is an affordable camera that places a high premium on image quality, as it ranks just behind the top performing Nikon D800 and Nikon D800E. It is also a significant improvement over the high-end professional flagship DSLRs, the Nikon D3X and the Nikon D4. Here are the DxOMark test results for the D600.

http://www.dxomark.com/index.php/Publications/DxOMark-Reviews/Nikon-D600-sets-high-bar-for-sensor-image-quality

Thanks for the link. Based on these comparisons, there is no question that Nikon is ahead of Canon with respect to technical innovation (superior sensor). I say this enviously as the owner of lots of Canon glass and 5D, 5D Mk II etc. Were I to start today I would choose a Nikon.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 19, 2012 at 20:49 UTC
On Canon EOS 6D preview (1035 comments in total)
In reply to:

fanderso3: to Alberto,
" Also can't use the lenses for the market of the aps-c cameras......another betrayal from Canon."
that's not betrayel...NONE of the full frame cameras can use the aps-c (EF-S) lenses, but all aps-c cameras can use the EF-S as well as the EF lenses.

You are correct as far as Canon dSLRs but Nikon has been a lot more thoughtful and customers really appreciate that APS-C lenses work with Nikon full frame sensor dSLRs. Another reason for us Canon owners (5D Mk II etc.) to feel envious of Nikon's far more innovative designs.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 19, 2012 at 20:33 UTC
Total: 163, showing: 81 – 100
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