Gesture

Gesture

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Joined on Jun 21, 2009

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Total: 742, showing: 81 – 100
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On Fujifilm X-T1 First Impressions Review preview (1657 comments in total)

Game changer. Candidate for world's best camera. Props Fuji.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 26, 2014 at 00:39 UTC as 90th comment
On Nikon D4s First Impressions Review preview (1047 comments in total)
In reply to:

Gesture: Nikon=continuous improvement.

Good thoughts by everyone. Nikon, Canon = Honda, Toyota. The newest model doesn't obsolete the earlier ones. But it will be interesting to see how PDAF on sensor and EVF evolve/advance.

I think the OVF could do more with integrated overhead display, but that isn't where the industry is trending.,

Direct link | Posted on Feb 25, 2014 at 22:23 UTC
On Nikon D4s First Impressions Review preview (1047 comments in total)

Nikon=continuous improvement.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 25, 2014 at 16:39 UTC as 192nd comment | 7 replies
In reply to:

Richard Franiec: Enthusiasts, pro's and up-graders are the shrinking consumer group. They are no longer able to satisfy and sustain the sales of ever expanding lines of new camera formats and models. Not to mention ever growing used gear market.
2-3 years old gear is almost as adequate as the new offerings.
In recent years only handful of product created big time disturbance. The example: Sony RX100.
It seems that the market is diversifying into niches: smart phones, super advanced compacts and specialized camera systems either by IQ or/and speed of operation. Anything in between is a fair game.
With declining sales it is inevitable that the prices will rise and the progress will slow down.

Yes. No one really tries to improve the interface. Going back to multiple dials is not an improvement. The Nikon Df is almost a parody of a camera. Only, the Pentax K-01 showed some imagination with the interface, but Pentax retreated,

Direct link | Posted on Feb 24, 2014 at 22:43 UTC
In reply to:

57even: Phone cameras probably only account for the loss of compact sales. Higher end sales are being damaged purely by people's lower spending and unwillingness to use credit.

Any maker who is centred in the enthusiast market, content to maintain a relatively small volume business, and has a relatively diverse business portfolio which can mask small losses in cameras, can probably tough it out by selling fewer models and building higher value luxury products with good margins.

Those at greatest risk are the companies whose revenues are highly volume dependent and who have substantial investment in plant, production and distribution, especially if cameras are a large proportion of total income.

Thus, may be better for Sigma and Fuji who appeal to a restricted, discriminating client base.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 24, 2014 at 22:40 UTC
In reply to:

slncezgsi: I guess the camera companies just need to lear that they potential market size in not going to grow in the near future and lear to make profit on sales that they have. It may mean that will will not be seeing a re-design or update to each and every line they produce (and keep adding new lines). It seem like they are trying to over-develop each other - and that costs money, money they do not manage to recover. All this mirror-less burst (new cameras, lenses) - look how much was accomplished in just few years - now probably need to take on a bit more relaxed pace with less investment costs. The tough part will be to communicate it to the consumer who got "spoiled" by the quick advancements and logically expect it to continue. Many shooter skip 1 or 2 camera generations, because they come all to fast and it always pays to wait for the next & better one.

Producing the finest cameras across the board of all time without sales interest. Yes.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 24, 2014 at 22:38 UTC

One of the first challenges, back in film days, was the family camcorder. Now, it's smartphone, tablet and cell phone cameras.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 24, 2014 at 22:37 UTC as 76th comment
In reply to:

Artifact: What a bunch of whiny photographers in this comment section! I just switched from canon 'cause d5300 had the best sensor for the price and I am loving it.
I do not know what is so great about mirrorless cameras though. They are much better than ones from 10 years ago but still no match to OVFs. If you move fast image in the viewfinder gets blurry. SLR with optical viewfinder is still the best thing for fast photography.

Let people enjoy their hobby of photography. This is photography's equivalent of the hot stove league in baseball. Nothing wrong. Very entertaining.

The D5100.D5200/D5300 clearly one of the sweet spots in DLSR photography. But OVF is not everything. There are focusing issues and OEMs didn't try to incorporate LCD features (overhead projection) over the OVF view. I would love OVF that gives a slightly greater field of view than the imaging area as a couple of Sigma DLSRs had out of necessity.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 19, 2014 at 01:05 UTC
In reply to:

Prognathous: Very interesting interview, but I wish he was asked about the aspect of compatibility of Sigma lenses with new bodies. Unlike Tamron and Tokina lenses which are practically always compatible with newer bodies (same as lenses from the camera brands), Sigma lenses frequently have compatibility issues, requiring them to be "re-chipped" or updated if the lens is recent enough. If the lens is old, then no such luck. Either use it with an old body, or try selling it to someone who does.

Is the reason for these issues the use of reverse engineering instead of getting the specs from the camera brands and paying royalties? This is the most common assumption, but it would have been interesting to hear the CEO take on this.

BTW, fitting lenses with a common micro-USB socket could have made updating lenses easier, more accessible and less costly than having to buy a dedicated USB Mount Dock. Hopefully they add it in future lenses.

Interesting, because presumably Canon and Nikon could figre out how to block 3rd party lenses?

Direct link | Posted on Feb 17, 2014 at 05:37 UTC
In reply to:

Chris Noble: Interesting article! "When Sigma was founded there were over 50 lens manufacturers in Japan. Now there are only really three major ones - Tamron, Cosina and Sigma. We have survived because we make unique products. "

I wonder how many camera-branded lenses are actually made by these 3.

Tokina?

Direct link | Posted on Feb 16, 2014 at 22:11 UTC

Because we NOW make unique products.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 16, 2014 at 22:11 UTC as 30th comment
On Fujfilm interview: 'The only way is to keep innovating' article (228 comments in total)

Thanks for posting. I admire Fuji for trying to advance the state of sensors and, especially, viewfinders. Most others refine rather than innovate. But customer service is where the OEMs must improve, including developing the industry equivalent of Technical Service Bulletins for cars in the US.

No more lens error, dust on sensor or internal corrosion as "user error."

Direct link | Posted on Feb 15, 2014 at 09:34 UTC as 89th comment
On CP+ 2014: Hands-on with Sigma DP2 Quattro article (256 comments in total)
In reply to:

dg90: Strange - the first time I saw this camera, I though "very interesting design".
But I thought this camera is much smaller and in this case I don´t get it, why they have added this big clunky grip. How´s the leverage? Can it be holded with one hand? :O

Would have put a similar, short grip on the left side. Have the guts to carry the design to a better conclusion. Best: make it a lens swivel design.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 15, 2014 at 04:41 UTC
On CP+ 2014: Canon stand report article (59 comments in total)

Thanks for showing EOS-M2.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 14, 2014 at 05:02 UTC as 18th comment
On CP+ 2014: Hands-on with Sigma DP2 Quattro article (256 comments in total)
In reply to:

ThomasSwitzerland: Look on your right hand when you want to grab something. The camera has been built around this in a practical human way. New horizons open up when using new methods. The Sigma might be very unusual and conflicting with what we are conditioned to see and use.

Smart Sigma people have developed a totally new design to function. This demonstrates vision, strategy and progress. And I like their courage – we need more of this breed in our boring mainstream world.

I would like to pull this camera out and take photos. Because my right hand balances and operates.

If this were the best ergonomic solution, why aren't more (any?) cameras designed similarly. There really is nothing special about the design. It is minimalist like many recent Sony and Samsung cameras. All the same buttons, icons, battery camber, door, strap lugs, hot shoe, lens platform, etc. everyone else uses. The potential was there with the extra real estate. At a minimum, for a high-level camera, how about dual card slots.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 14, 2014 at 01:43 UTC
On CP+ 2014: Hands-on with Sigma DP2 Quattro article (256 comments in total)
In reply to:

ThomasSwitzerland: Look on your right hand when you want to grab something. The camera has been built around this in a practical human way. New horizons open up when using new methods. The Sigma might be very unusual and conflicting with what we are conditioned to see and use.

Smart Sigma people have developed a totally new design to function. This demonstrates vision, strategy and progress. And I like their courage – we need more of this breed in our boring mainstream world.

I would like to pull this camera out and take photos. Because my right hand balances and operates.

Being able to grab something and being able to hold on to it while using thumb and fingers to adjust controls are two different things. I just took a whole slew of cameras I ordinarily hold in the right hand with a grip projecting forward, turned them around and held with left hand and grip projecting backward. Much less comfortable.

This camera begs a swivel design a la early Coolpix cameras. Then, I would be excited about the design. As it stands, nothing special.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 13, 2014 at 17:00 UTC
On CP+ 2014: Hands-on with Sigma DP2 Quattro article (256 comments in total)
In reply to:

T3: It looks like it should be a wide format (6x17) camera. But it's not!

Begs a true 16:9 sensor and LCD.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 13, 2014 at 06:31 UTC
On CP+ 2014: Hands-on with Sigma DP2 Quattro article (256 comments in total)
In reply to:

completelyrandomstuff: It's a pity they are not planning to make a wider angle version - 24mm or 21mm equivalent. Typically people use those for landscapes and, at least for me, either of these two focal lengths would be ideal.

Too imaginative. Great idea.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 13, 2014 at 05:57 UTC
On CP+ 2014: Hands-on with Sigma DP2 Quattro article (256 comments in total)
In reply to:

Aaron C Greenman: Barnaby,

Can you handle the version of the DP2 with the leather half case and OVF and give your impressions of how it handles and the view? Take a photo of someone holding it up to their face to understand size, proportion and ergonomics?

Thanks,

ACG

Stealth mode, Barney!

Direct link | Posted on Feb 13, 2014 at 05:56 UTC
On CP+ 2014: Hands-on with Sigma DP2 Quattro article (256 comments in total)
In reply to:

todo pana: Did anybody think of taking a picture of this camera actually hand-held...? I mean by the grip?

How does it balance, Barney.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 13, 2014 at 04:31 UTC
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