PIX 2015
Marty4650

Marty4650

Lives in United States NC, United States
Works as a Retired Industrial Engineer
Joined on May 20, 2005

Comments

Total: 1044, showing: 61 – 80
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In reply to:

Cjar: How many camera bags do you need for each camera?
The goal of this site is to get you to spend money on things you don't need.

Six or seven bags per camera. Each one designed for it's own special purpose.

More than that would be wasteful. :)

Direct link | Posted on Jun 5, 2015 at 13:21 UTC
On Sony rides wave of US Mirrorless sales surge article (732 comments in total)
In reply to:

Everlast66: If you are regularly reading DPR, you would be left with the impression that Nikon is making one market hit after another, together with Panasonic, Canon and even Samsung.

Looking at the latest reviews:
Nikon
D7200 - 84%
D750 - 90% this should be best camera ever
D610 - 87%
D810E - 84%

Canon
7D II 84%

Panasonic
LX100 - 85%
GH4 - 85%

Samsung
NX1 87% "in a class of its own"

At the same time Sony were hardly getting marks above 80, many of them getting Silver awards despite being unique products without direct competitors:
A7 - 80% Silver
A7R - 82%
A7II - 82% Silver
A6000 - 80%
RX100 - 78% Silver, needed 3 iterations to get above 80% and Gold
RX100II - 79% Silver
RX100III - 82%
Only the A7S managed to slip in there with 86%

Surprisingly buyers are rushing to buy these inferior Sony products (price is factored in the marks) and running away from DSLRs, even Nikon's heavy hitters in the 90% range.

Obviously DPR marking is a bit off lately and needs calibration.

@ Richard....

I remember a time when the Sony DSLRs got the lowest review ratings of all brands here. It wasn't until their very last one, the A560 that they finally cracked "Highly Recommended."

They have come a long way since then. And at this point, every new camera seems to be pretty darn good. The difference between cameras rated "silver" or "gold" often comes down to features or innovations, and not any dramatic difference in image quality.

When all cameras perform pretty well, then the review scores become somewhat pointless. You really have to read the review to see what sets them apart and match the pros and the cons against your own personal needs and wants.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 4, 2015 at 21:02 UTC
In reply to:

Marty4650: I wonder if this is just a fancy box with a Sony NEX5 inside?

I suppose you need to buy one to find out.

Yes, I saw that.

There could be 3 or 4 Sony NEXs in that box with a stitching program!

Direct link | Posted on Jun 4, 2015 at 20:52 UTC
On Sony rides wave of US Mirrorless sales surge article (732 comments in total)
In reply to:

cgarrard: It would be very interesting to re-visit the overall numbers when Mirrorless cameras can match or exceed the continuous AF performance of the big DSLR brands.

Sony adding pro support to the overall package has helped appeal as well. But they know, and need to work on, a greater lens line up for the system to stay in first position.

Its a heated race.

@ bluevellet....

Any electronic gadget you buy today is a work in progress. The new ones will always be better than the old ones, even if just by a very small margin.

The reflex mirror designed camera is a very mature product, so further improvements will come very slowly, and be less useful. They are still improvements, but not the ones that get ordinary people too excited.

But the MILC segment has some catching up to do, and this might happen very rapidly. Just look at how much the EVF has improved in the past few year! While the OVF was perfected around 25 years ago.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 4, 2015 at 19:58 UTC

I wonder if this is just a fancy box with a Sony NEX5 inside?

I suppose you need to buy one to find out.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 4, 2015 at 19:40 UTC as 34th comment | 8 replies
On Sony rides wave of US Mirrorless sales surge article (732 comments in total)
In reply to:

cgarrard: It would be very interesting to re-visit the overall numbers when Mirrorless cameras can match or exceed the continuous AF performance of the big DSLR brands.

Sony adding pro support to the overall package has helped appeal as well. But they know, and need to work on, a greater lens line up for the system to stay in first position.

Its a heated race.

Exactly right.

Always remember that MILC is a work in progress, and there have been some pretty impressive improvements made in the past 8 years. Like everyone else did, Sony will improve their FE system too.

Meanwhile, Nikon and Canon keep grinding out the same camera with a few minor improvements year after year.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 4, 2015 at 19:27 UTC
On Sony rides wave of US Mirrorless sales surge article (732 comments in total)

Sony found a void, and filled it.

There were PLENTY of really nice MILC cameras on the market, but none had full frame sensors. The very best MILC cameras were those that were "about as good" as DSLRs with crop sensors.

Most MILC cameras have trouble tracking moving objects (unless they incorporate PDAF), there was very little incentive for a high end user to switch to MILC for any reason other than "portability." They would gain nothing in image quality over their DSLR, would lose some size and weight, but then suffer a AF tracking penalty.

Then Sony came alone with the first full frame MILC camera, and soon had four different versions of it out, using three different outstanding sensors. They even have one model with IBIS. And plenty of new lenses from Sony and Zeiss.

Now the high end user can trade UP from a crop sensor DSLR to a full frame MILC camera. And will often have a kit smaller and lighter than his DSLR kit.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 4, 2015 at 18:15 UTC as 77th comment | 2 replies

Because it is so EASY to adapt manual lenses to M4/3 mounts, we now have dozens of them. All they are doing is taking an existing lens and giving it a M4/3 mount that has absolutely no electronic contacts. Sort of like supergluing an M4/3 adapter....

There are currently at least eight f/0.95 lenses from Voightlander, SLR Magic, and Mitakon, and at least twenty manual focus prime lenses from Samyang, under various brand names. There are even fifteen Zeiss Cine lenses you can buy that come supplied with M4/3 lens mounts. (And... those Zeiss lenses don't come cheap.)

Direct link | Posted on Jun 4, 2015 at 01:45 UTC as 4th comment | 2 replies
On Mono a mono: Leica M Monochrom (Typ 246) hands-on article (683 comments in total)

No red dot, no sale!

I mean... what is the point?

Direct link | Posted on Jun 1, 2015 at 14:21 UTC as 94th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

Marty4650: If this lens was made from solid gold, it would cost $18,600 (15.5 ounces x $1200).

So it really is a bargain at $6,000!

(Hey, I wonder how much light solid gold can transmit?)

There are all good points.

I need to save up $133,200 so I can get this lens made in pure gold. And I suppose I will need to spend another $5,995 to get the glass parts too.

Thanks for all the help, guys!

Direct link | Posted on May 28, 2015 at 00:21 UTC

If this lens was made from solid gold, it would cost $18,600 (15.5 ounces x $1200).

So it really is a bargain at $6,000!

(Hey, I wonder how much light solid gold can transmit?)

Direct link | Posted on May 27, 2015 at 21:23 UTC as 63rd comment | 4 replies
In reply to:

FinDERP: Looks a lovely bag but it's way out of the range I'd be willing to pay for something like this - even if I had a large disposable budget I'd sooner spend it on lenses and probably large format gear too large to fit in anything carryable anyway haha.

I appreciate that ONA is taking time to answer comments and queries here though, that's really a great effort and I wish more companies would act like this!

Which Leica lens can you buy for the price of this camera bag? You might be able to buy a nice lens hood or a lens cap, but not a Leica lens.

Anyone who actually owns a $10,000 Leica won't bat an eye at spending $400 more for a nice bag for it.

This bag just wasn't designed for the value shopper.

Direct link | Posted on May 21, 2015 at 21:05 UTC

An interesting alternative to having a lens mount.

Just buy the same camera four times.

Kudos to Sigma for marketing innovation!

Direct link | Posted on May 20, 2015 at 01:38 UTC as 40th comment | 5 replies
On Hands-on with the Panasonic Lumix DMC-G7 article (495 comments in total)

The new G was worth waiting for!

This looks like a lot of MILC camera for the money. I hope they sell a ton of them.

Direct link | Posted on May 18, 2015 at 13:00 UTC as 110th comment | 3 replies
On Field Test: Sigma 19mm, 30mm and 60mm F2.8 DN lenses article (161 comments in total)
In reply to:

SeeRoy: These are daft focal lengths for MFT application since they more or less duplicate existing, reasonably priced equivalents (in many cases faster) from other brands - notably Olympus and Panasonic themselves.
Why "deceptively pleasing"? Are they in reality repulsive? Do explain.

Yes, absolutely right.

These are NOT the world's best lenses. So anyone can find fault with them and pick them apart. However they are damn fine lenses, and they are very useful focal lengths, and they are incredibly well priced.

Set all the petty bickering aside.

Sigma has created some wonderful options for Sony E and M4/3 users. And I am glad they did.

Direct link | Posted on May 12, 2015 at 13:32 UTC
On Field Test: Sigma 19mm, 30mm and 60mm F2.8 DN lenses article (161 comments in total)
In reply to:

Marty4650: I really wonder why Sigma doesn't market these lenses with Fuji X and Samsung NX mounts?

It may be just a question of volume, because anything that works for Sony E should work equally well for Fuji X and Samsung NX.

I hadn't even considered that. You are right.

I looked it up... flange distances:

Nikon 1 mount.........17.0mm
Fuji X mount............17.7mm
Canon EF-M.............18.0mm
Sony E mount..........18.0mm
Micro Four Thirds.....19.3mm
Samsung NX............25.5mm

So NX might be out of the question.... but some others might be possible.

Direct link | Posted on May 9, 2015 at 21:00 UTC
On Field Test: Sigma 19mm, 30mm and 60mm F2.8 DN lenses article (161 comments in total)
In reply to:

Marty4650: I really wonder why Sigma doesn't market these lenses with Fuji X and Samsung NX mounts?

It may be just a question of volume, because anything that works for Sony E should work equally well for Fuji X and Samsung NX.

DSLR lenses are Sigma's bread and butter, but the existence of DN lenses proves they see an opportunity in making lenses for MILC cameras too. One out of every four ILC cameras made today is a MILC camera, so ignoring 25% of their market could be risky.

Also remember, both Tamron and Tokina, Sigma's direct competitors, have created lenses for MFT. So I think Sigma is here to stay.

I suppose smaller volume is the only thing preventing Sigma from offering their E mount designed lenses in NX or X mounts.

It might get interesting for NX and X mount users, if Zeiss is providing high end lenses, and if Sigma ever decides to provide more affordable lenses for their systems.

Direct link | Posted on May 9, 2015 at 12:05 UTC
On Field Test: Sigma 19mm, 30mm and 60mm F2.8 DN lenses article (161 comments in total)

I really wonder why Sigma doesn't market these lenses with Fuji X and Samsung NX mounts?

It may be just a question of volume, because anything that works for Sony E should work equally well for Fuji X and Samsung NX.

Direct link | Posted on May 8, 2015 at 21:21 UTC as 59th comment | 7 replies
On Field Test: Sigma 19mm, 30mm and 60mm F2.8 DN lenses article (161 comments in total)
In reply to:

SeeRoy: These are daft focal lengths for MFT application since they more or less duplicate existing, reasonably priced equivalents (in many cases faster) from other brands - notably Olympus and Panasonic themselves.
Why "deceptively pleasing"? Are they in reality repulsive? Do explain.

I hope everyone understands that these lenses were designed for APS-C, and then adapted for MFT. This was because it is very easy to do, and still provides useful focal lengths for MFT users.

Consider the crop factor... for APS-C these are 28mm, 45mm, and 90mm equivalents. Three of the most popular prime lens types ever made.

For MFT, these lenses become 38mm 60mm and 120mm equivalents, still very useful but nothing anyone would call a classic focal length.

Sigma has never designed a lens for the 4/3 sensor. Even during the hey day of 4/3 when Sigma was offering 14 different lenses with 4/3 mounts... all 14 were really APS-C lenses.

Direct link | Posted on May 8, 2015 at 21:19 UTC
On Field Test: Sigma 19mm, 30mm and 60mm F2.8 DN lenses article (161 comments in total)

Damien... very nice and very informative review. However I do have one minor quibble.

It is a mistake to call a 30mm lens designed for MFT or APS-C a "wide angle lens." Similarly, you really can't call a 60mm lens a "normal prime lens" either.

Since none of these lenses were designed for full frame, and no one would even think of using them on a full frame camera, why are we categorizing them AS IF they were full frame lenses?

Direct link | Posted on May 8, 2015 at 21:11 UTC as 60th comment
Total: 1044, showing: 61 – 80
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