Marty4650

Marty4650

Lives in United States NC, United States
Works as a Retired Industrial Engineer
Joined on May 20, 2005

Comments

Total: 660, showing: 41 – 60
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On Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 III Review preview (724 comments in total)
In reply to:

Marty4650: I'm really impressed at how good the image quality is coming from "the smallest of the large sensors."

I am also baffled at why Sony hasn't made market share gains against Canon and Nikon in light of all the innovation coming from Sony, and the absence of much innovation from the two market leaders.

I say that because Canon and Nikon have a combined 80% market share, and they don't make junk. They really do make some outstanding cameras. If they have a fault, it is they tend to rest on their laurels too much, and don't take much risk.

But any broker will tell you "past performance is no guarantee of future results." And they might miss the boat by failing to look forward.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 23, 2014 at 15:30 UTC
On Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 III Review preview (724 comments in total)
In reply to:

Marty4650: I'm really impressed at how good the image quality is coming from "the smallest of the large sensors."

I am also baffled at why Sony hasn't made market share gains against Canon and Nikon in light of all the innovation coming from Sony, and the absence of much innovation from the two market leaders.

Donnie... here's the thing.

If Nikon and Canon ever committed to the MILC market in a big way, they could easily crush everyone else. They have the engineering skill, they have the design talent, they have the production expertise, and they have the marketing muscle.

But the fact that they aren't fully committed tells us something. They must feel this whole trend will blow over, or perhaps "has peaked."

This might be a risky and dangerous assumption to make, because the market is changing as the demographics and habits of their users change.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 23, 2014 at 15:15 UTC
On Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 III Review preview (724 comments in total)
In reply to:

AndreSJ: RX100 III

NX Mini

Nikon A

Ricoh GR

this 1" battle is getting interesting

But which is right for you??

Andre... I think the 1" sensor has become the new 4/3 sensor.

The smaller sensor that is behind, but making progress at catching up. Of course, a smaller sensor can never really catch up with one two or three times larger... but it surely can get to the point where it is "good enough" for the needs of 90% of the market.

Ten years from now we might have three kids of cameras with three distinct quality steps:

* Full frame
* 1" Sensor
* Cell phones

Direct link | Posted on Jun 23, 2014 at 14:45 UTC
On Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 III Review preview (724 comments in total)

I'm really impressed at how good the image quality is coming from "the smallest of the large sensors."

I am also baffled at why Sony hasn't made market share gains against Canon and Nikon in light of all the innovation coming from Sony, and the absence of much innovation from the two market leaders.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 23, 2014 at 14:41 UTC as 150th comment | 17 replies
In reply to:

Cal22: Leutenegger mentions "Turner" (amongst others) as someone who inspired her. Does she speak of the painter William Turner or the photographer Pete Turner? In any case both of them might inspire with their distinctive approach to colors. However is there any impact of "Turner" in Leutenegger's photos? May I use this opportunity and point especially to Turner's water colors to all of you who rejoice in color composings? (You can find a lot of them in the internet. And Pete Turner might be interesting because of his striking usage of color film)

As to Leuteneggers photos: Maybe her book can transport her works better than this website can do. You could also think that one day people will be celebrating her photos as great evidence of a world long ago as has happened here quite recently with "1939: England in Color".

Cal.... think about this.

Some old photos are prized just for their historical value. They have documented places and events that are long gone, and the number of photos made was relatively small.

But today everyone with a cell phone is a photographer. We have billions of photos taken every day. Whenever a fight breaks out on a subway or a fast food restaurant, you see four different versions of it posted on YouTube within hours.

There are something like less than 200 known photos of Abraham Lincoln that still exist today. We probably could find billions of photos of Barack Obama if we tried to catalog them all.

Future historians will have quite a job on their hands sifting through all the clutter. It will all be there, but it will be very difficult to find exactly what you are looking for without looking through them all.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 22, 2014 at 20:13 UTC
In reply to:

TacticDesigns: Was this shot on film or digital?

Then Mamiya and Nikon should sue her.

Those photos look like they were taken with a Vivitar compact P&S camera.

I suppose this settles the question, and proves the old saying "It's not the camera, it's the photographer."

Direct link | Posted on Jun 21, 2014 at 21:38 UTC
On Sony Alpha 7S added to test scene comparison tool article (269 comments in total)

So, I guess there really is an advantage to having a few nice big fat pixels, rather than having a whole lot more teeny tiny ones.....

Direct link | Posted on Jun 20, 2014 at 11:21 UTC as 41st comment | 14 replies
In reply to:

Daniel Lauring: I'd rather see Tamron, or Sigma go after a truly empty space. For example focal lengths over 300mm. How about a 100-400mm F3.5-5.6. Or how about a mini-Bigma...150-500mm?

Daniel... another "open space" that someone needs to fill:

a 100mm f/2.8 Macro

Direct link | Posted on Jun 19, 2014 at 23:54 UTC
In reply to:

RGiskard: This isn't an interesting lens to me, personally, but I am really glad to see it brought to market. I hope that Tamron is encouraged enough by its reception to m4/3 that it devotes future resources to developing lenses for the format. I have fond memories of the Tamron zoom I had for my Sony SLT, it was relatively bright for the range and IQ was pretty good for the price.

And I feel just the opposite way.

By creating the FOURTH superzoom lens for M4/3, and making it the most expensive one, Tamron will sell very few of these. This is more likely to discourage them than encourage them to make more M4/3 lenses.

Had they done something sensible... like creating a lens the system needed, or making an existing sort of lens, but faster, cheaper or better... then they might have a hit on their hands.

This lens is like "the sixth shoe store at the mall." It won't draw enough business and will be shut down in three months.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 19, 2014 at 19:23 UTC
In reply to:

Artistico: I have been wondering when this super zoom would make its way to M43. I also find it a bit interesting from the point of view that one would normally expect this to be an IS lens (Or VR, as Tamron would call it).

I think it is about time Panasonic starts following the strength of the trend, making IBIS standard too, and drop OIS from their new lenses, or they are going to lag behind the others.

It probably seemed a good idea at the time, but I think they'd make more money in the long run. M43 being a universal mount, there is less incentive to stay with the brand than how it has been for Nikon and Canon and their choice to keep IS in lenses.

In order to have the best selection of lenses for M43, one needs both Panasonic and Olympus ones. Not having IBIS is a compromise that will make people more likely to choose Olympus bodies over Panasonic.

Every single Olympus M4/3 camera has IBIS, and they all work. So any lens mounted on any Olympus M4/3 camera will have image stabilization.

You're right about only three cameras currently offering 5-axis IBIS (EM5, EM1, EP5) but all the others still have some type of IBIS. The EM10 has 3-axis, and all the others have 2-axis.

Like you, many people say they don't need any IS on shorter focal length lenses. But many others do find it useful on all their lenses. So Panasonic is essentially limiting their sales to people in the former group by not having OIS on every lens they sell.

You are also right about OIS being a better choice for video. Anyone who is really serious about video would have purchased a GH camera anyway!

Direct link | Posted on Jun 19, 2014 at 11:17 UTC
In reply to:

Adrian Harris: The real problem with curved sensors is that if anyone dares introduce them, their customers current lens line-up will be obsolete overnight. Which company would dare do that???
...well Sony already have about 4 different lens systems, so what the heck, here we go for a 5th lens line-up!!!

Would Canon or Nikon dare do that?
...which is maybe why it hasn't been done before.

Yes, they have 3 lens mounts that cover 4 different systems.

Even though you can use a DX lens on an FX camera without needing an adapter, the lens will result in severe vignetting. Which is why they have a "crop mode" for those. The same thing happens when Sony E lenses are used on a Sony FE camera.

Naturally, the reverse isn't true. You can always use a FF lens on a crop sensor camera and it will work perfectly. In fact, it will usually work better than using a lens designed for the crop sensor, because the camera is now only using the central part of the image circle. The sharpest part.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 19, 2014 at 11:09 UTC
In reply to:

chris_j_l: Not understanding the commercial rationale behind this. Olympus has 1 that covers this range, Panasonic has 2 that cover this range. Now we have Tamron wanting to cover this range.
I'm all for choice and that, but there is a phenomenal amount of me-too bunching of glass focal length in u4/3 with little or no differentiation between them bar the manufacturer name.
Tamron does have 1 jump on Oly and Pana in this - the announcement of the lens appears to be followed by sales 1-2 months later. Pana/Oly seem to be in the "announce this year, available 2 years later" which may as well be "available for sale on the 16th of Neveruary"

Chris... exaggerate much?

Olympus and Panasonic have released over 40 lenses for M4/3 so far, and almost all of them were available immediately after being announced.

There were a very small handful of very high end lenses that were announced a year or more before availability. Specifically, a couple the Olympus PRO lenses and the Panasonic-Leica 42.5mm f/1.2 lens and the Panasonic-Leica 150mm f/2.8 lens.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 19, 2014 at 11:03 UTC

As usual, someone has already checked the "I had it".....

It's really amazing how fast people can buy and sell a lens the day it is announced.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 19, 2014 at 10:33 UTC as 44th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

Artistico: I have been wondering when this super zoom would make its way to M43. I also find it a bit interesting from the point of view that one would normally expect this to be an IS lens (Or VR, as Tamron would call it).

I think it is about time Panasonic starts following the strength of the trend, making IBIS standard too, and drop OIS from their new lenses, or they are going to lag behind the others.

It probably seemed a good idea at the time, but I think they'd make more money in the long run. M43 being a universal mount, there is less incentive to stay with the brand than how it has been for Nikon and Canon and their choice to keep IS in lenses.

In order to have the best selection of lenses for M43, one needs both Panasonic and Olympus ones. Not having IBIS is a compromise that will make people more likely to choose Olympus bodies over Panasonic.

True.... however, once you buy any Panasonic body except the GX7, you are locked into Panasonic lenses if you want image stabilization. An Olympus camera owner can use either brand lenses and still have IS. For most Panasonic camera owners, their only choice is Panasonic lenses if they want image stabilization.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 19, 2014 at 10:29 UTC

CS5 still works fine for me. And even that has around 300 features I don't need and will never use...

Direct link | Posted on Jun 18, 2014 at 21:19 UTC as 43rd comment
In reply to:

Adrian Harris: The real problem with curved sensors is that if anyone dares introduce them, their customers current lens line-up will be obsolete overnight. Which company would dare do that???
...well Sony already have about 4 different lens systems, so what the heck, here we go for a 5th lens line-up!!!

Would Canon or Nikon dare do that?
...which is maybe why it hasn't been done before.

@ hippo84

Sony has two lens mounts but four different systems, each one requiring lenses designed for it.

- Alpha mount for APSC
- Alpha mount for FF
- E mount for APSC
- FE mount for FF

Direct link | Posted on Jun 18, 2014 at 10:11 UTC
On 2014 Waterproof Camera Roundup article (226 comments in total)
In reply to:

Marty4650: Serious underwater photography was always done with DSLRs tightly sealed in very expensive waterproof enclosures. But for underwater snapshots, these cameras are great.

This whole category ("underwater snapshot cameras") might disappear if the iPhone 6 is waterproof.

I suppose a waterproof tablet could be next?

I suppose you are right. Strictly speaking these are "rugged cameras" which happen to be pretty well waterproofed. As such, they are ideal for hikers, bikers, fishermen, kayakers, or anywhere else where you can expect rough handling or wet conditions. They aren't the best choice for underwater photography by a long shot, but they still can do it.

I also think these cameras are good choices for very young children, who are hard on things. A used rugged camera can be a great choice for a 5 year old's first camera.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 17, 2014 at 14:48 UTC
On 2014 Waterproof Camera Roundup article (226 comments in total)

Serious underwater photography was always done with DSLRs tightly sealed in very expensive waterproof enclosures. But for underwater snapshots, these cameras are great.

This whole category ("underwater snapshot cameras") might disappear if the iPhone 6 is waterproof.

I suppose a waterproof tablet could be next?

Direct link | Posted on Jun 17, 2014 at 14:10 UTC as 55th comment | 12 replies
On 2014 Waterproof Camera Roundup article (226 comments in total)

It might have been interesting to see how well the Nikon 1 AW1 performed against these cameras. Compared to the four cameras reviewed, the Nikon 1 has a "huge sensor."

Direct link | Posted on Jun 17, 2014 at 13:28 UTC as 57th comment | 13 replies
On DPReview Reader Showcase: Underwater photography article (11 comments in total)

This is really good stuff.

Especially those 360 degree shots (#9 and #10). You really have to admire these amateur photographers.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 15, 2014 at 17:15 UTC as 6th comment
Total: 660, showing: 41 – 60
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