Marty4650

Marty4650

Lives in United States NC, United States
Works as a Retired Industrial Engineer
Joined on May 20, 2005

Comments

Total: 866, showing: 21 – 40
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If Nikon knows they have a problem with the D750, then they would be crazy to keep selling them.

They are right to pull them off the shelves, inspect and repair them, before returning them to the retail market. Why keep selling cameras that could create unsatisfied and irate customers. Take them back and fix them!

The "sudden disappearance" sounds like a good business decision to me.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 15, 2015 at 16:00 UTC as 78th comment | 5 replies
In reply to:

D1N0: They stole their logo from Infinity

https://www.nexcarauto.com/uploads/Cars%20Logos/infiniti-Nexcarauto.jpg

http://www.venuslens.net/wp-content/uploads/2014/12/logo_small1.png

Yes... but at least they turned the Infiniti logo upside down.

You think that might help them in a trademark infringement lawsuit?

Direct link | Posted on Jan 14, 2015 at 22:00 UTC
In reply to:

Marty4650: It looks like Sony is getting serious about FE.

Smart move, on their part. I hope Canon and Nikon are paying attention.

I'd say Sony has PLENTY of lenses for E cameras, and needs a few more for their FE models.

Of course, the E mount APSC users will always want more, and will envy the 50+ AF lenses available for M4/3, but that isn't a good reason to NOT make more lenses for FE full frame cameras.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 13, 2015 at 12:56 UTC
On Canon to move camera production back to Japan article (108 comments in total)

This really isn't good news for Japan, because it just means they will gain a few jobs only as long as the Yen value is depressed. The instant the Yen gets stronger, then the jobs get shipped back to Cambodia, Thailand or anyplace else where labor is cheaper.

Most customers won't care one way or the other. The "Japan built is better" myth has long since faded away. Anything can be well built, or poorly built anywhere in the world today.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 12, 2015 at 22:51 UTC as 18th comment | 7 replies
In reply to:

Caerolle: Ah, good, a macro lens, and a 28! Nice, if the quality is as high and the price is as reasonable as the 55. Now if they just make an 85. And a 135 would be great, too.

You could get even smaller lenses with Pentax Q.....

Direct link | Posted on Jan 10, 2015 at 22:51 UTC
In reply to:

Marty4650: It looks like Sony is getting serious about FE.

Smart move, on their part. I hope Canon and Nikon are paying attention.

I think the fact that Pentax has a very nice 50-135mm high grade lens, rather than a 70-200mm one, is a pretty good sign that they are committed to APS-C and not planning a journey to FF.

Sony is trying to emulate Canon and Nikon by using the same lens mount for APS-C and FF, and hoping that people buy the FE lens "so they can upgrade later."

Of course, any time you use FF lenses on a crop sensor camera you pay the size and weight penalty... but you end up only using the sharpest part of your lens. The center. So it does have advantages.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 10, 2015 at 19:40 UTC
In reply to:

Nordstjernen: I am reading a lot of "This is not for me, so the Sony guys have made a bad choise with these lenses". Those people will never buy any of the announced lenses anyway, probably no camera from this maker either. They just are here to act like product and sales specialists. Always knowing exactly what is wrong. Just boring.

Manual focus lenses will always be smaller than their Auto Focus equivalents. And all those Leica rangefinder lenses are manual focus.

And yes... pancake lenses are pretty small... but the M4/3 pancakes are even much smaller. There just is no getting around the physics. Larger image circles require larger lenses. This isn't a myth, it's a scientific fact.

That being said.... FF will win 100% of the time for image quality, but it's hard to make a case that they can be the smallest lenses. They can be "smaller" then other full frame lenses if designed that way, but they can never be the smallest when compared to lenses for smaller sensors.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 10, 2015 at 15:18 UTC
In reply to:

Nordstjernen: I am reading a lot of "This is not for me, so the Sony guys have made a bad choise with these lenses". Those people will never buy any of the announced lenses anyway, probably no camera from this maker either. They just are here to act like product and sales specialists. Always knowing exactly what is wrong. Just boring.

@SFXR.... these lenses ARE small for FF. But M4/3 will always be smaller and lighter.

Sony can build a small FF camera, but they cannot repeal the laws of physics. Larger image circles require larger lenses.

If you really prefer small and light, but also want FF quality, then the only option you have is to become a dual system user.

A Sony A7 and a Panasonic GM1 might make a nice combination.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 10, 2015 at 00:28 UTC

It looks like Sony is getting serious about FE.

Smart move, on their part. I hope Canon and Nikon are paying attention.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 9, 2015 at 22:01 UTC as 101st comment | 14 replies
On Opinion: The myth of the upgrade path article (1321 comments in total)
In reply to:

Duckie: APS-C crap is a serious topic. Not that APS-C is bad of cheap but the money grabbing mentality of manufacturers.

Who can remember the Disc camera and the APS film camera? They sold you simplified stuff, easier and cheaper to manufacture together with the format change to maximise profit.

Luckily in modern digital world progress is still plentiful. But they modify the format to create new markets e.g. Remember the outrageous claims that old lenses are so unsuited for new digital cameras of the same DSLR mount. This is untrue and I can attest to that since the 6 mega pixel age (with Nikon lenses, not the cheapest tier though). Shooting ancient lenses with modern digital bodies is not rare as the forums can show.

Format change is good if it really suits you. If you have already invested in something and that something is good, think twice before giving up good stuff!

Duckie...

A good lens will always be a good lens. A digital sensor doesn't know or care what lens you put in front of it. The lens is just there to transmit light, and to transmit it accurately and efficiently.

The only reason digital lenses even exist is for automation and to adjust for crop factors. If you shoot manually, and actually want a 75mm f/2.0 lens for your APSC DSLR, or 100mm f/2.0 for your 4/3 DSLR, then a good quality 50mm f/2.0 film lens will work fine. And usually be a lot cheaper to boot.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 9, 2015 at 10:58 UTC
On Opinion: The myth of the upgrade path article (1321 comments in total)
In reply to:

wetsleet: "Fallacy 1: Full frame is the optimal end-point to aspire to"

True. But the very term "full frame" itself implies that anything smaller is something of a half-measure. It would be interesting to know who first coined the term, consumers or marketers?

When the 35mm format was specified, absolutely no allowance was made for the demands and opportunities of digital photography (obviously), and yet somehow it is held up as offering the optimum compromise for digital cameras, and anointed with a name which enshrines that perceived supremacy.

You really need to put the question in context.

Prior to the availability of "affordable digital cameras" in the late 1990s, virtually EVERYONE was using 35mm film cameras. And I mean virtually everyone.

So the 35mm frame size became the defacto standard. Every smaller sensor was considered "cropped" even if it was designed from the ground up for digital. Like the Four Thirds system was.

And then this was compounded by the fact that Canon, Nikon, Pentax and Minolta wanted to use their existing 35mm film lenses for their new digital cameras, in order to have an instant lens catalog, rather than creating new lenses from the ground up.

In fact, many of the first DSLRs were simply 35mm film SLRs with their "guts" converted!

Direct link | Posted on Jan 9, 2015 at 10:51 UTC
On Opinion: The myth of the upgrade path article (1321 comments in total)

Well written and 100% correct.

Nice job, Richard.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 8, 2015 at 20:28 UTC as 297th comment
On Canon announces five PowerShot compacts article (150 comments in total)

I'd like to thank Canon for this nostalgic journey back to 2008.

Many of us old people hate change, so Canon is the brand for us!

Direct link | Posted on Jan 5, 2015 at 20:37 UTC as 27th comment | 3 replies
On Canon announces five PowerShot compacts article (150 comments in total)
In reply to:

mpgxsvcd: Just when I think Canon can’t fall any further they amaze me again with their ineptitude.

I am going to just say it. Canon’s camera division will see a “Real Decline” in sales this year(2015). Their camera division will take a beating mainly because cameras like this won’t sell as well as they have in the past.

In 2016 they will scrap their entire compact camera line and only focus on DSLRs and enthusiast cameras. However, their sales will decline dramatically across the board that year because most of their diehard fans will realize that their money is better spent elsewhere.

In 2017 Canon will see sales so low that they scrap everything but their higher end DSLRs and Lenses. They will continue to produce cameras and lenses for Pro photographers but their brand name will not carry any weight with regular consumers.

After that Canon will end up a lot like Leica and Hasselblad. They will be insignificant to everyone except for the people with more money than sense.

Nikon has been in the MILC market since Sept 2011 with their Nikon 1 products. That's over four years now. They have introduced ten different MILC cameras and thirteen MILC lenses since then.

The Nikon 1 might be the most "serious" MILC camera with a smaller sensor. I don't know how successful they have been with their system based on a 1" sensor, but Samsung recently followed them into this market niche with their own NX Mini line.

I think most people would agree, as sensor technology improves MILC cameras with smaller sensors will become more competitive. It really makes you wonder if Sony will ever release an RX100 ILC model.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 5, 2015 at 16:22 UTC
On Nikon D750 Review preview (1838 comments in total)
In reply to:

James Bligh: I cannot find a word about internal reflection and shutter shock issues of D750 in this review. Please point me to it if I missed it. When dpreview never even mentions (not to say evaluate) the issues, you can no longer say dpreview review is a comprehensive review which I think is a shame. Once renowned for its objective reviews and a comprehensive source of information about camera gears I am afraid dpreview has fallen into the realm of mediocrity many review sites share. The present generation of dpreview staffs may have wasted their talent and ruined the reputation of dpreview. Phil Askey will lament over it seeing the prestige he has built up tainted.

Since Amazon sells every brand and model made, and makes a profit by selling any of them, it doesn't make logical sense for them to "push" any particular brand or model.

Since Dpreview needs to maintain their credibility it makes no sense for them to NOT be completely objective when rating cameras.

These silly claims that Dpreview ratings are somehow trying to boost Amazon sales are laughable. All these cameras are reviewed by multiple sources and all the sources seem to agree on which ones are the best.

When you can find a camera that Dpreview rates highly, but everyone else rates low, or the reverse, then there might be a case. But I haven't seen this happen yet.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 20, 2014 at 13:51 UTC
On Nikon D750 Review preview (1838 comments in total)

A truly wonderful camera.

Kudos for Nikon for modernizing the high end DSLR by shrinking it slightly and loading it with features and abilities many buyers want today. And then selling it for a very reasonable price. This camera gives up very little to it's larger and heavier siblings, but adds a lot of nice improvements.

This now becomes the obvious choice for any high end enthusiast who can afford to spend just a little more, and doesn't mind the extra size and weight.

I honestly don't think this camera, as good as it is, will take any sales away from the Sony A7 cameras, because they are fundamentally two different concepts. Each one having it's own advantages.

We now have proof that a dinosaur can survive if it evolves into a bird.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 20, 2014 at 13:40 UTC as 361st comment
On High-end full frame roundup (2014) article (578 comments in total)
In reply to:

MikeF4Black: I really cannot understand why my camera didn't get top ranking. What was DPR thinking of?

There is very little quality difference between cameras made in Japan, or made anywhere else in Asia. The manufacturers aren't stupid. They want cheaper labor, but they won't do it at the expense of quality.

Labor costs impact most at the low and mid level. All those $4,000 cameras and lenses are probably still built in Japan, because there is no practical need to save $100 on something that expensive. Especially if the customer perceives some value in "where it's made."

Direct link | Posted on Dec 9, 2014 at 05:41 UTC
On WaterWeight rethinks the sandbag approach to stability article (78 comments in total)
In reply to:

mais51: What an environmentally unfriendly product - what do you do with the water when you finish - tip it out then what, fill it up again and again - a strong fabric net that could be filled with rocks or earth would be far more better and better still you don't have to worry about water leak.

How is this "environmentally unfriendly?" Is there ANYTHING on earth easier to recycle than water?

Dump it out on the ground. It evaporates. It comes back as rain!

Direct link | Posted on Dec 9, 2014 at 04:10 UTC
On High-end full frame roundup (2014) article (578 comments in total)
In reply to:

MikeF4Black: I really cannot understand why my camera didn't get top ranking. What was DPR thinking of?

Not very many cameras or lenses are "made in Japan" today.

The Japanese manufacturers are outsourcing to China, Cambodia, Malaysia and Vietnam, in search of lower labor costs.

It's like deja vu.... all over again!

Direct link | Posted on Dec 8, 2014 at 21:22 UTC
On All-in-one: Ona Capri bag review article (168 comments in total)
In reply to:

Just a Photographer: This is a very feminine bag.
I can't imagine using this bag being a man unless your being a sissy.

Also this bag is very vulnerable to being stolen as you can't keep it on you while taking photos.

@ Just a Photographer...

Yes, it is a very feminine bag. Which is a good thing since it is designed for women.

All bags are vulnerable to be stolen. Whether they look like purses, or whether they are black canvas backpacks that say "NIKON" on them. Most thieves are smart enough to know a camera bag when they see one.

It seems it is entirely possible to keep this bag on when you are shooting. It has a shoulder strap, leaving both hands free.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 8, 2014 at 19:23 UTC
Total: 866, showing: 21 – 40
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