Summi Luchs

Summi Luchs

Joined on Nov 9, 2012

Comments

Total: 81, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous12345Next ›Last »
In reply to:

Fogsprig: Epson R-D you again?

@le-alain: Unfortunately the a7 sensor does not work very well with Leica M and Zeiss ZM wideangle lenses. The CMOSIS sensors will do (Leica uses CMOSIS). Let us wait and see if the 'electronic rangefinder' will be a real alternatove to an optical RF.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 25, 2015 at 14:53 UTC
In reply to:

DVT80111: Sony FE mount would be nice.

Don't think many A7 users want to carry a 1100grams heavy lens. So I guess Tamron will never produce a FE version.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 24, 2015 at 20:16 UTC
On Fujifilm announces X-A2 with selfie-friendly LCD article (132 comments in total)

Do selfie-shooters still use cameras ?

Direct link | Posted on Jan 15, 2015 at 09:52 UTC as 32nd comment | 2 replies
On Hands-on with Nikon's new D5500 article (283 comments in total)
In reply to:

agaoo: Nikon was my favourite camera but I'm no longer impressed by it's new cameras. Mirrorless cameras with 4K video, weather-sealed body, sexy design and even technology advanced functionality and durability explain Nikon is still in the past. Good luck Nikon :-)

What do you expect from an entry-level DSLR ? At its price point the D5300 was a very good camera.So it was clear that its successor would come with minor improvements only. As long as sensor technology will not reach a new breakthrough, most improvements in DSLRs will be minor. 4K enabled mirrorless like the Pana GH4 cost much more then Nikon's 5xxx series. Samsungs NX1, Fuji T1 etc. maybe more advanced but niether are entry level cameras. So I find the 5500 a very fair offering.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 6, 2015 at 10:27 UTC
On BPG image format aims to replace JPEGs article (208 comments in total)
In reply to:

photolando: I've been shooting jpegs most of my pro career. I have never once had a problem with "jpeg artifacts". I've sold 24"x30" and have seen larger made from jpegs. They look fantastic. And yes, I shoot raw as well if I feel it is needed so lets not start that stupid amateur argument.

Maybe this is aimed at pixel peepers because I've yet to hear anyone really complain all that much about the look of a jpeg image. Ever!

@Lambert: I totally agree, but that's what I said. The M9 renders very good DNG files, and by PS, LR or Capture One you can get very good JPG from it. But the in-camera generated JPG files are at least one quality level below.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 16, 2014 at 19:19 UTC
On BPG image format aims to replace JPEGs article (208 comments in total)
In reply to:

photolando: I've been shooting jpegs most of my pro career. I have never once had a problem with "jpeg artifacts". I've sold 24"x30" and have seen larger made from jpegs. They look fantastic. And yes, I shoot raw as well if I feel it is needed so lets not start that stupid amateur argument.

Maybe this is aimed at pixel peepers because I've yet to hear anyone really complain all that much about the look of a jpeg image. Ever!

Then you are lucky to have a camera with a good jpeg engine
There are quite a few cameras out that show lots of artifacts or other problems leading to sub-par image quality. Examples are the Leica M9 (lousy jpg but very good dng output), diverse Sony cameras (artifacts), Panasonic GX7 (too aggressive noise reduction at higher ISO). So some people see these artifacts in their images. I assume, you don't use one of these cameras for your business.
But I agree so far, that these problems do not lie in the jpeg format itself. They are caused by the in-camera processing used by their manufacturer.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 16, 2014 at 12:12 UTC
On Have your say in our 2014 Readers' Polls article (64 comments in total)
In reply to:

Kekal B Hollow: sigma dp2Q is the best camera of all time...nothing beats it, no D810, no 645Z, no NX1, no phase one, sigma is the best camera ever made

I assume, this post is a joke.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 16, 2014 at 11:40 UTC
In reply to:

Summi Luchs: My guess is that they will use the sensor-shift to de-Bayer the image. They can move the red, green and blue pixels between the exposures so, that they get a full RGB sample for every pixel (like a Foveon sensor). This would not give us 'true' 40MP resolution, it is simply the same calculus of 'equivalence' Sigma uses for its cameras. (Sigma uses a factor of three, Oly gets a lower factor of equivalence, as the Bayer sensor is not RGB but RGGB).
The gain would be better color information, that what makes Foveon images special.

I don't think they do the same as Hasselblad and other earlier attempts to increase true resolution by sensor movements. Earlier sensors had more blind gaps between the photosites making such techniques meaningful. Newer sensors have a dense array of microlenses (to gather more light per photosite), so there is not much left to sample in between.

@duartix: I agree that increasing the sample rate leads to a higher resolution even if you get highly overlapping samples. Some spatial highpass filtering then could generate some more 'distinct' pixels from the blurry raw sample. But it would be tough to increase resolution by a factor of 2.5 without the need of too many samples leading to much longer exposure times. Only if there would be strong light falloff of the microlenses towards their edges the overlap would be smaller and the gain per additional sample would be higher than my initial guess. So let us see an wait what approach Olympus will go.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 5, 2014 at 17:23 UTC

My guess is that they will use the sensor-shift to de-Bayer the image. They can move the red, green and blue pixels between the exposures so, that they get a full RGB sample for every pixel (like a Foveon sensor). This would not give us 'true' 40MP resolution, it is simply the same calculus of 'equivalence' Sigma uses for its cameras. (Sigma uses a factor of three, Oly gets a lower factor of equivalence, as the Bayer sensor is not RGB but RGGB).
The gain would be better color information, that what makes Foveon images special.

I don't think they do the same as Hasselblad and other earlier attempts to increase true resolution by sensor movements. Earlier sensors had more blind gaps between the photosites making such techniques meaningful. Newer sensors have a dense array of microlenses (to gather more light per photosite), so there is not much left to sample in between.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 5, 2014 at 10:36 UTC as 53rd comment | 5 replies

Price is much too low for the targeted audience.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 26, 2014 at 10:07 UTC as 51st comment
In reply to:

Volkan Ersoy: From Sony website, on 5-axis IS:

"When using a third-party mount adapter, performance, functionality and operation are not guaranteed and Sony will take no responsibility if a malfunction occurs."

I take this as an indication that 3rd party mount adaptor producers can work it out with their new models.

Doesn't surprise me. One of the usual blahblahs to keep users from using off-brand parts. And maybe the technical issue already mentioned by Smeggypants. I don't know if Sony will provide manual input for focal length lkie Olympus or Pentax.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 20, 2014 at 13:56 UTC

Good news for all waiting for a D300 replacement: This camera did not take engineering time from other projects. One might even doubt that it took designer time...

Direct link | Posted on Nov 18, 2014 at 14:03 UTC as 54th comment

At least logical step in the evoluton of digital cameras. Most of today's digital cameras are more or less conventional cameras where electronics have replaced film. This is one of the ways to use electronics more creatively. Time will show if this device will be useful. It is like evolution of life. There were several periods of high radiation (many new kinds of species appeared within a reletively short period) but only few of them survived.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 18, 2014 at 09:43 UTC as 15th comment
In reply to:

Summi Luchs: What surprises me most is the mediocre quality of the (prime) lens. Making good lenses is Leica's core competence. Lens quality is the first reason to buy a Leica (or is it second to prestige today ?). I assume Leica engineers know that and can do much better. So I have to ask if the tested camera was a dog - probably a misaligned lens ? Even that would put a shame on their QC (at least in relation to their price level). If not, I get more and more difficulties to understand Leica's business model.

Good center sharpness today is not the main differentiator of good and mediocre lenses. Even cheap kit lenses often offer good center sharpness wide open. I would have expected better edges for a premium price and the corners do not catch up very well even at f 5.6.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 13, 2014 at 16:07 UTC

What surprises me most is the mediocre quality of the (prime) lens. Making good lenses is Leica's core competence. Lens quality is the first reason to buy a Leica (or is it second to prestige today ?). I assume Leica engineers know that and can do much better. So I have to ask if the tested camera was a dog - probably a misaligned lens ? Even that would put a shame on their QC (at least in relation to their price level). If not, I get more and more difficulties to understand Leica's business model.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 13, 2014 at 14:56 UTC as 21st comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

Summi Luchs: Good news. So I can employ the designers and make a new luxury car based on a Subaru.

Subaru is a good car, as well as Sony makes good cameras. But it would be ridiculous to turn a Subaru into a $300K luxury car as it was with the Lunar etc.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 9, 2014 at 08:09 UTC

Good news. So I can employ the designers and make a new luxury car based on a Subaru.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 8, 2014 at 22:08 UTC as 98th comment | 2 replies
On A second glance: two takes on the Leica X article (397 comments in total)
In reply to:

marc petzold: nothing bad meant - but the two first woman pictures could have been made with any other camera, too..there's no special "Leica" Feeling from it, either way - also, these compositions are in nothing short any kind of something special, no offence...the 2nd picture also looks like blown out highlights into the hairs of the model, too.

I understood the picture with blown-out highlights as an illustration for the text (whe the author complains about blown out highlights). It is not meant as a "good" photo.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 7, 2014 at 14:28 UTC
In reply to:

Everlast66: I think it is laughable to call anything associated with the M4/3 system "PRO"!!

Surely there would be one or two enthusiasts, but no normal professional will rely on a M4/3 sensor for their professional work.

@maxnimo: So all professional sports photographers are amateurs as they don't use 8x10" ?

Direct link | Posted on Nov 3, 2014 at 10:36 UTC

Your article suggests it's good news that you no longer have to buy a GX7 and a 2.8 12-35mm lens if 12-35mm is all you need and want a m4/3 sensor + built-in EVF. But, honestly, I doubt that this ILC-body-lens combo would have been taken as a serious alternative to a premium compact.

OTOH, for photographer needing the full flexibility of an ILC a fixed lens 24-70 equiv. camera makes no sense. You can easily get equivalents for 14-600mm focal lengths (and more with adapters) using the ILC. The only point is, that before large sensor compacts became available you HAD to buy a DSLR or (later) an ILC if the image quality of a small sensor compact wasn't enough. But this problem has gone - at least since the first RX100.

So, this comparison looks somewhat anachronistic to me, even if these cameras share some of their guts.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 2, 2014 at 22:06 UTC as 79th comment | 1 reply
Total: 81, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous12345Next ›Last »