SLOphoto1

SLOphoto1

Joined on Oct 19, 2011

Comments

Total: 9, showing: 1 – 9
On Canon launches PowerShot SX150 IS superzoom article (20 comments in total)
In reply to:

Shutterbug108: I wish that Canon has designed in a Lithium-ion battery instead of AA batteries in the SX150 camera.

Sanyo eneloop AA batteries are guaranteed for at least 1500 recharges, and are made of a long-lasting material which should not significantly lose its recharge potential for at least 10 years or more. Lithium ion batteries have a shelf-life of about 2 years. They will be dead - unable to recharge - in 3 to 5 years even if they are never used at all.

AA batteries are standardized, lithium ion batteries are not.

New-generation rechargeable AA batteries of the eneloop type are FAR MORE GREEN than ANY type of lithium ion battery currently made. Your statement is uninformed, ignorant, absurd, preposterous and totally and completely opposite the actual truth about GREEN BATTERIES.

AA new-generation rechargeable batteries are the ONLY TRULY GREEN BATTERIES CURRENTLY BEING SOLD TODAY for use in digital cameras.

Ttoday's AA battery-powered cameras will still work for 100,000 shots right out of the brand-new dusty box they were safely stored in on the shelf all of those years.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 14, 2012 at 17:01 UTC
On Canon launches PowerShot SX40 HS 35x CMOS superzoom article (159 comments in total)
In reply to:

SLOphoto1: I just posted a video I made on You Tube about the problems the SX40 has in making nighttime time-lapse photos virtually impossible.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ncILazaR18g&hd=1

When you say, “CHDK does not violate warranty,” you are actually offering a legal opinion. Are you qualified to do that?

Canon’s official policy is that if you use ANY non-approved software in any of their cameras it DOES void the warranty. It is irresponsible to post information which ignores that fact.

However safe you may personally feel CHDK to be, you still use CHDK at your own risk. Canon’s legal department says that it DOES void the warranty to use it in one of their cameras. If something does go wrong, then legally you are on your own to fix it at your own expense.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 2, 2012 at 19:47 UTC
In reply to:

jotor: No mention of GPS--a killer for me.

What have you seen happening? A delay in shutter release which you attributed to a GPS feature? And you were able to confirm through testing that the delay was not caused by any other factor? Was GPS the only factor contributing to the delay? How long was the actual delay? Was there a feature to turn off the GPS on the camera used? If not, then which non-GPS cameras were used for testing comparison? How exactly did you determine that the GPS feature caused this delay?
By your theory this would delay every single shot taken from a moving car. Without some solid evidence, that allegation is preposterous. What exactly is your evidence for this theory of yours?

Direct link | Posted on Dec 16, 2011 at 04:47 UTC
In reply to:

AllanZ: That sucks they removed the 30 second Shutter speed as well as the 60 second shutter speed :(, i used the FZ seires cameras for astrophotography of the milkyway back in July :( now all i got is 15 seconds? >:( although glad to see the iso's are improved , just wished they added the longer shutter speeds, but again maybe its less now to keep the sensor temperature at its lowest due to it wearing out more, and thuse being permanent to banding noise issues the fz100, is this possible ? yes , because when i got my FZ100 i used it on P and M modes to 20 second shutter speeds until at iso 400 and 800 and got no band noise(blue lines across the image when too dark) and then one day i updated my firmware , and went outside for star photography and went on a shutter speed of 60 seconds at iso 400 and got the worst picture quailty ever, even if WB or NR is adusted at smooth settings it dosnt look good, hope they make the fz200 later on, but by that time ill probably get a Canon 60D ;)

That sucks! I agree 100%. Same reason - limited astrophotography. That was one of the main reasons I intended to buy this camera over a Canon model, because similar Canon models are all limited to a 15-second shutter speed. There is no technical reason for it. Now Panasonic is doing it too? This is so frustrating. Why do all the manufacturers have to dumb-down their general-use cameras like this?

Direct link | Posted on Dec 16, 2011 at 04:26 UTC
On Canon launches PowerShot SX40 HS 35x CMOS superzoom article (159 comments in total)

I just posted a video I made on You Tube about the problems the SX40 has in making nighttime time-lapse photos virtually impossible.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ncILazaR18g&hd=1

Direct link | Posted on Nov 28, 2011 at 07:48 UTC as 12th comment | 3 replies
On Canon launches PowerShot SX40 HS 35x CMOS superzoom article (159 comments in total)
In reply to:

jcburke: Anybody who needs GPS data for all pictures should just cut back on the drug prescriptions so they can recall where the heck they were when they pressed the shutter. I mean, really, go buy a point-and-shoot camera with GPS instead; the rest of us know where we were and what we shot.
I may make an exception for National Geographic photogs (who wouldn't be buying this camera anyway for other reasons), but otherwise GPS is a crutch for amateurs and has nothing to do with core imagery and creative photography. If it is your discerning feature between two cameras, then you are not a photographer, you're a map freak.

The original comment was utterly contemptuous arrogant ignorance in the extreme. I've used my GPS to track my position along rural roads to see exactly which turn of the road I was on when I took each photo.

The person who posted the original comment is an impostor, not a real photographer in any genuine sense of the word. No one with any real world professional experience in travel photography would ever have posted such an utterly ridiculous comment as that.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 8, 2011 at 01:39 UTC
On Canon launches PowerShot SX40 HS 35x CMOS superzoom article (159 comments in total)
In reply to:

NoNerd: l have a SX20 and after 3 years it feels like it is getting worn out so l was waiting to buy the SX40 as a replacement, which l will not as just like the SX30 it runs on a IONLithium battery and not AA's. For me a bridge is a travel camera. This year l have spent 2 weeks in the Sahara and 2 x 2 weeks in the Himilayas in both cases there were no possiblities to charge batteries, which didnt bother me as with the XS20 l use lithium AA's that allow abt 1500 shots. l have now bought a Fuji HS20 (uses AA's!), but l don't like it's handling. Could Canon PLEASE make the XS50 for AA's. One last remark for those who want RAW on a bridge. My HS20 has it and uses abt 15 seconds to calulate a RAW shot, so no travel camera. It can only do this because of the manual zoom elec.consumption is low, but for a traveller it's a useless camera as you can't make fast situation shots of people and movements.

Buy a "second" or "third" rechargeable battery for 2 weeks of photo shooting in the Sahara or in the Himalayas, or for 10 days shooting in Alaska north of the Arctic Circle like we just said in our posts above? Buy these extra batteries for each of the 3 or 4 cameras we are carrying with us? And if there is no place to plug in those 3 or 4 battery chargers? Shooting an average of about 1000 photos per day, that should last maybe 2 days at most. Some of the cameras will end up being used more than others so their spare batteries will start to run out first. Using your system the remaining charged batteries will not be interchangeable in the other cameras, and since they would not be AAs, and you wouldn’t even be able to buy or trade with the locals to get some standard replacement batteries for them to keep on shooting.

How would you suggest we handle that situation, based of course on your own similar travel experience in photography?

Direct link | Posted on Nov 1, 2011 at 07:21 UTC
On Canon launches PowerShot SX40 HS 35x CMOS superzoom article (159 comments in total)
In reply to:

NoNerd: l have a SX20 and after 3 years it feels like it is getting worn out so l was waiting to buy the SX40 as a replacement, which l will not as just like the SX30 it runs on a IONLithium battery and not AA's. For me a bridge is a travel camera. This year l have spent 2 weeks in the Sahara and 2 x 2 weeks in the Himilayas in both cases there were no possiblities to charge batteries, which didnt bother me as with the XS20 l use lithium AA's that allow abt 1500 shots. l have now bought a Fuji HS20 (uses AA's!), but l don't like it's handling. Could Canon PLEASE make the XS50 for AA's. One last remark for those who want RAW on a bridge. My HS20 has it and uses abt 15 seconds to calulate a RAW shot, so no travel camera. It can only do this because of the manual zoom elec.consumption is low, but for a traveller it's a useless camera as you can't make fast situation shots of people and movements.

I totally agree with the AAs. I made a trip to northern Alaska last month, and HAD to rely on an AA battery camera. I used the Canon SX 130 for that very reason - because it still runs on AAs. Some nights I could recharge them, some nights I could not. I ran out of extra recharged AAs at one point, but was able to buy 2 four-packs of AAs at a truck stop just north of the Arctic Circle and keep on shooting. Try that with ANY other battery! Canon, PLEASE bring back the SX50 in an AA battery format! There are those of us who go out into the wild to photograph, and we need a good camera with a AA battery power source that we can rely on because it is universally available to us in an emergency if we cannot get our own batteries recharged for a few days! And the AAs also cost a lot less than proprietary lithium batteries, and they can be transferred to the next camera or to a million other devices whenever we make an upgrade. Please listen to us!

Direct link | Posted on Oct 19, 2011 at 10:52 UTC
On Canon launches PowerShot SX40 HS 35x CMOS superzoom article (159 comments in total)

The Manual setting does NOT "offer[s] the complete flexibility of full manual control" for the SX40. There is now a governor on it. Try to set the ISO at 400 for a night shot, and then spin the dial towards a 15 second shutter speed. It stops it at 1 second and drops the ISO to 100. Then a message appears on the LCD which says, "ISO speed is limited due to slow shutter speed." I verified it with Canon today. Canon also verified that all previous Canon cameras DID allow full Manual control in setting both the ISO and shutter speed, but no more. This has halted a large portion of the sunset and night photography I have been doing of the Monterey Bay Harbor for the past 2 years. It is condescending and insulting to long-term Canon users to presume to say to us, "We think you don't know what you are doing, and we are no longer going to let you use those traditional manual settings anymore." Obviously if we use a Manual setting it is precisely because we DO KNOW what we are doing!

Direct link | Posted on Oct 19, 2011 at 10:21 UTC as 14th comment | 3 replies
Total: 9, showing: 1 – 9