bigley Ling

bigley Ling

Lives in New Zealand (Aotearoa) New Zealand (Aotearoa)
Works as a Engineering
Has a website at bigleyling.com
Joined on Jun 21, 2004
About me:

take more photos,

Comments

Total: 213, showing: 1 – 20
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On LG releases G3 with QHD screen and laser-AF post (60 comments in total)

Interesting this laser AF. I think Sony used a laser back in the day when the Cybershot F-707 was released to aid low light focus

Direct link | Posted on May 27, 2014 at 22:57 UTC as 16th comment | 4 replies
On Nokia releases update to its Camera Beta app post (18 comments in total)
In reply to:

pwilly: Nokia's Camera Beta makes a huge difference in the capabilities of my 928 vs. my Galaxy Nexus.
Apple apparently agrees and has kidnapped the creative lead from the Nokia imaging division. I hope that like most technology developers the workers were the creators that made the department head look good.
Try a Nokia, you will be amazed at the creative options and the speed at which they can be accessed.

What the iPhone lacks is the ability to uses physical control to activate the shutter. The dual stage half press to focus and full press to capture has been proven to work well with standard cameras since the advent of autofocus capability.

Maybe Apple will finally incorporate a dual function "volume up" button to have a dual stage activation.

Direct link | Posted on May 19, 2014 at 23:04 UTC
On Nokia releases update to its Camera Beta app post (18 comments in total)
In reply to:

RFC1925: No 1020 support for the new features is a big let down.

Pretty much the Processor in the 1020 has been made obsolete. So apart from the 41Mp camera capturing ability, one has to look towards the 930 and the 1520 for the latest and greatest updates.

Direct link | Posted on May 19, 2014 at 23:01 UTC
On Nokia releases update to its Camera Beta app post (18 comments in total)
In reply to:

Digital Suicide: The first thing Nokiasoft should fix is the image colors in 1020. They are way oversaturated and are ok only for Ken Rockwell perhaps...

For this reason I wish Nokia would add color, sharpness, and saturation control real time as it was on the Nokia 808!

With only a set default color setting, you cannot please everyone as every one has different tastes. Also different scenes need different color profiling, eg for landscapes one may want a more saturated image, whereas for portraits, a more neutral tone may be desirable to achieve better skin tonality.

Cmon Nokia/Microsoft, these kind of presets were available on the initial release of the very ancient Nokia n8. Why is there none for the newer Lumia camera phones?

Direct link | Posted on May 19, 2014 at 22:59 UTC
On Nokia releases update to its Camera Beta app post (18 comments in total)
In reply to:

Coguar: I sell my Lumia 1020,because of bad colours, and lowlight photography is under my exceptions... and now I'm happy with unbeatable photo quality that come out of my Iphone 5s with #Cortex Camera APP.
Usable apps are also there for photo editing...

sry Nokia, not yet, and maybe never again....

tried this cortex app and it works wonders. Just ensure you have a steady hand. As for the 1020 bad colors, I am not sure if it is that bad, but rather not to ones taste. Personally I am still enjoying the neutral accurate colors I get from the 808

Direct link | Posted on May 19, 2014 at 22:54 UTC
In reply to:

LANDSHOTS: but what about the sony s5 ? the s5 has 16 mp.

Hey Lars, I know the 808 is not a modern smart phone anymore, but it still is a smart phone and does fit the criteria of being "compact sized".

I am pretty certain the 808 would do well against these compact smart phones. :)

Direct link | Posted on May 12, 2014 at 20:51 UTC
In reply to:

tompabes2: Hi guys, with the Sonys in manual mode you have to set the "Image Stabilizer" option to ON to go above ISO 400.

interesting, considering the whole idea of choosing a higher ISO is to increase the shutter speed, and hence negate the requirement for an image stabilizer.

Direct link | Posted on May 12, 2014 at 20:48 UTC
On Shooting Raw with the Nokia Lumia 1020 post (72 comments in total)
In reply to:

AbrasiveReducer: I understand raw capability should made it more attractive to serious users. But wouldn't a serious raw user conclude that to get better quality, one needs to use a camera to take pictures?

Phone camera's are pretty good these days, and with RAW support it just adds flexibility especially at times when one does not have their camera at their disposal

Direct link | Posted on Feb 26, 2014 at 03:37 UTC
On Shooting Raw with the Nokia Lumia 1020 post (72 comments in total)
In reply to:

djohnfot: An interesting exercise but the only benefit I can see from shooting RAW is a slight improvement in DR.

true, although one assumes the auto white balance to get it right first time, to alleviate having to correct it post.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 26, 2014 at 03:35 UTC
On Shooting Raw with the Nokia Lumia 1020 post (72 comments in total)
In reply to:

Houseqatz: being able to REALLY edit the images from a camera phone is a dream come true. it's not always practical to carry around a dslr, but i always have my phone on me. the 1020 is the best solution for my needs, mostly taking notes, and quick snaps, and when i want more, it delivers.

i have yet to use a camera phone that is as capable in the image department, or whose output affords as much editing latitude. i know that the 808 is supposed to outperform the 1020, but i have never seen one in the wild.

I frequently edit my RAW files on my Oly E-M1, if I need to extract a quick JPG for sharing online etc.

The oly in camera RAW to JPG allows for basic exposure, contrast, shadow recovery and art filters. One can also crop, reduce red eye, etc during the conversion process.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 26, 2014 at 03:33 UTC
On Shooting Raw with the Nokia Lumia 1020 post (72 comments in total)

based on what I can see from the crops, the out of camera JPG is superior to ACR converted raw with noise reduction. ACR without noise reduction is sharper and has more details than out of camera JPG but then the result seems rather noisy.

Be aware that the 1020's ISO 1600 may be close to ISO 400 on comparable cameras.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 24, 2014 at 08:20 UTC as 27th comment | 5 replies
In reply to:

JoeWall: I broke my Android and now back on my 4-year old iPhone. The company that puts a decent 1 inch sensor in a smartphone gets my money

ooo, is there a VOIP app for the 1020?

Direct link | Posted on Jan 27, 2014 at 04:17 UTC
In reply to:

RichRMA: Eesh!

"With a DxOMark sensor score of 41 points, the Nokia 1020 ranks 222 out of 242 cameras tested."

how do you skip the lens when sensor scoring with phones or cameras with fixed lens? I would imagine the only way would be to completely cover the 1020 lens, and capture essentially a dark exposure and analyse that?

Even if DXO omits looking at the rest of the camera part of the 1020 as a whole, it is still interesting to know how the "engine" performs. Alot of people when they see a nice car, they will ask how much horse power it has, and not how is the suspension in this car, or how many and what kind of gear box a car may have.

That being said, it is good to see the 1020 is keeping up with the likes of digicams, considering it is after all a smart phone, and also it has been quite a technological achievement to maintain good pixel IQ while having such tiny 1.1 micron pixels.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 26, 2014 at 20:06 UTC
In reply to:

jmanzar: The pictures from this phone look very good but there aren't any good image apps for windows phone.

the ability to have RAW processing on the run can be handy when out and about. Of course using a computer is most ideal for optimum raw processing results.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 26, 2014 at 01:30 UTC
In reply to:

RichRMA: Eesh!

"With a DxOMark sensor score of 41 points, the Nokia 1020 ranks 222 out of 242 cameras tested."

Was DXO not using RAW processed data for their sensor scoring?

Direct link | Posted on Jan 26, 2014 at 01:27 UTC
In reply to:

jmanzar: The pictures from this phone look very good but there aren't any good image apps for windows phone.

@HowaboutRAW

or transfer the RAW image files to a nice android tablet, run PhotoMate R2 and process them on that.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 25, 2014 at 20:26 UTC
In reply to:

yslee1: 25 seconds to open a RAW file even on a Snapdragon 800? Ouch.

25 seconds to convert a 20MP image is not too bad, and if you have a work flow plan, you can set the tablet to convert in the background.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 19, 2014 at 19:58 UTC
In reply to:

delpic: Interesting, but with all the technology & software it really comes down to the laws of physics & the far larger sensors & massively superior optics of DSLR's are always far superior than manipulated images from small sensor cellphones.
I would argue conversely that even a 10 year old good high point & shoot camera can still produce better quality than today's phones. DSLR's, even the lowest cost are in a totally different league.
The main & possible only advantage of the phone camera is as it has always been that it is the camera you are more likely to have with you.
The reason some non photographers can't tell the difference is they are looking at such small images & maybe don't even care about quality at all.

Have you seen the quality of the Nokia 808 and 1020. You will be amazed at what can be achieved from a mobile phone if there is good illumination.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/bigley/11925152795/sizes/o/

Just look at the detail in that boot and tell me a 10 year old high end point and shoot camera match the sheer resolution of this phone.

Below is a link to a full res oversampled 8mp shot. Look how clean the image becomes at 8MP, and see the amazing Bayer free detail.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/bigley/9435208558/sizes/o/

Direct link | Posted on Jan 14, 2014 at 01:57 UTC
In reply to:

Willi Kampmann: I think the results are very interesting, but they aren't putting enough focus on the severe shortcomings of the phones, especially the low-light shots.

I've got an iPhone 4S and frankly, I hate the 1/15s shutter setting -- without an optical image stabilization I often get blurry results even when there are no moving objects. Compare that to my E-M5's IBIS which basically lets me shoot blur-free at 1/15s while jumping on one foot. To me this is one of the most impressive technical advances in cameras in the past decade! The Nokia 1020 has OIS but I doubt its efficacy because of its simpler nature. The Nokia 1020's low-light shot also shows another shortcoming: the poor dynamic range. The shadows are completely black!

Of course those shortcomings are just temporary. The iPhone 5S already captures near-instant HDR images thanks to its fast A7 processor; automatic pixel averaging through burst shots is the logical next step. Imagine the large Lumia sensor combined with the A7's speed!

There is no doubt the IBIS in olympus E-M5 or E-M1 will be superior to a mobile phone even if it has image stabilization of some kind. But just look at the size of the 1020 for instance vs the EM-5.

As for dynamic range, smaller sensors are indeed plagued with poorer signal to noise and reduced dynamic range. But if you use DNG RAW output provided in the 1020 or 1520 you will be pleasantly surprised how much shadow detail you can recover.

I own the older Nokia 808, which only does JPG, and I deliberately underexpose landscape scenes in order to preserve highlights, and as for shadows appearing black, shadow recovery seems to work extremely well with this particular phone.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 14, 2014 at 01:51 UTC
In reply to:

MistyFog: Dean, I was rather curious about the relatively high ISO used by the 1020, and the very low ISO used by the iPhone. I would have thought that at ISO3200 versus 1250, there would be more than twice the amount of light in the 1020's image. Any comment on why this might be the case? Also, what was that +0.66 Raw adjustment?

I think if you want an OIS battle, one should also consider including Olympus E-M1 into the equation, since you are insisting stabilization should be taken into account.

Also remember capturing live subjects may not be be still for a 1/15 second shot! The benefits of high ISO performance and artificial flash or LED illumination come into play then

Direct link | Posted on Jan 9, 2014 at 17:32 UTC
Total: 213, showing: 1 – 20
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