PIX 2015
sh10453

sh10453

Lives in United States Michigan, United States
Works as a Electrical & Computer Engineer
Joined on May 2, 2010
About me:

Been shooting since the days of Adam and Eve!

Comments

Total: 251, showing: 1 – 20
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On A lot to like: Real-world Leica Q gallery posted article (164 comments in total)

Just thinking loud, and asking myself "What if I make a smart purchase by ordering one of these but without a 25 years old German bride, would the price be cut by 50%?"

I think only Leica can answer that question.

Talking to myself again: Great camera. $2,000 for the camera, and $4,000 for the Leica name! Not a bad deal!

Direct link | Posted on Sep 1, 2015 at 04:02 UTC as 2nd comment
In reply to:

sh10453: Hats off to Fuji. This is excellent customer service.
Panasonic could learn a lesson from this.
This is the type of company I would want to buy its cameras.

Never again will I purchase another Panasonic camera. Three different cameras, with the same firmware problems/ issues, and no firmware update, is more than enough for me.

In burst modes (with and without flash), they produce colorful horizontal lines (from 2 to 5 lines, of different colors) across the RAW image.
They are actually arcs (curves), not straight horizontal lines, and it's near impossible to fix such an image.
This doesn't happen to every image, but it happens quite often, which has resulted in lost opportunities many times.
I have not noticed it in single image mode.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 1, 2015 at 03:22 UTC
In reply to:

sh10453: Bummer! It is not micro 4/3ds. So we can't use our favorite m4/3 lenses.
Good way to kill a camera before its birth.
Perhaps Canon is hoping for more people (who are not already Canon users) to buy EF lenses for this camera, but I believe that this calculation is wrong.
Buying just one "L" lens for it (like 24-70mm, f/2.8 L) would make the price well over $2,000.
Being an APS-C sensor, I'm thinking this camera is competing with no one but Canon entry level cameras (which are relatively small in size nowadays anyway), and it's a lot more expensive than them, so it can't win.

I doubt very much that it will bring Canon new customers. An m4/3ds would have been a better direction for this particular camera, imho.

But it is good for Canon users who already have their collection of EF lenses and want the light weight.

That's how I see it, but others may see it differently.
I will pass.

I agree (regarding Panasonic).
After purchasing 3 Panasonic cameras (2 of them directly from Panasonic), I will no longer buy another Panasonic product (I have had major issues with their high end land-line telephones as well).
All three cameras (different models) exhibited the same issue (ruined RAW images), and in exactly the same way "colored horizontal lines across the RAW image; mainly in burst modes").
That tells me it's a common software (firmware) issue, regardless of the hardware.
A company in this size and caliber would be expected to respond quickly with firmware updates.
None of that has happened (after more than 2 years of complaints).
So it is goodbye Panasonic, and hello Fuji.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 1, 2015 at 03:10 UTC

Bummer! It is not micro 4/3ds. So we can't use our favorite m4/3 lenses.
Good way to kill a camera before its birth.
Perhaps Canon is hoping for more people (who are not already Canon users) to buy EF lenses for this camera, but I believe that this calculation is wrong.
Buying just one "L" lens for it (like 24-70mm, f/2.8 L) would make the price well over $2,000.
Being an APS-C sensor, I'm thinking this camera is competing with no one but Canon entry level cameras (which are relatively small in size nowadays anyway), and it's a lot more expensive than them, so it can't win.

I doubt very much that it will bring Canon new customers. An m4/3ds would have been a better direction for this particular camera, imho.

But it is good for Canon users who already have their collection of EF lenses and want the light weight.

That's how I see it, but others may see it differently.
I will pass.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 30, 2015 at 02:05 UTC as 3rd comment | 4 replies

Hats off to Fuji. This is excellent customer service.
Panasonic could learn a lesson from this.
This is the type of company I would want to buy its cameras.

Never again will I purchase another Panasonic camera. Three different cameras, with the same firmware problems/ issues, and no firmware update, is more than enough for me.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 29, 2015 at 22:22 UTC as 7th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

graybalanced: Always secure your camera. Don't take safety for granite...

Of course

Direct link | Posted on Aug 29, 2015 at 22:15 UTC

Complaints, complaints, complaints!
What's life without whining and complaints!

Whiners: "Why is this news? NASA used it 23 years ago".
It's news because many current photographers weren't even born back then, or maybe they were in 7th grade school, and it's the first time they hear about it.

There was a civil war in the USA back in the 1800's, why are silly news media reporting civil wars all over the world these days?

23 years ago NASA didn't use an F18, so it's news on just this factor alone.
If it is old news to you, rather than all this negativity, just move on to the next article because this is interesting science! The rest of us do like it.

Thanks for an interesting article, Damien.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 28, 2015 at 15:33 UTC as 10th comment
In reply to:

graybalanced: Always secure your camera. Don't take safety for granite...

Hi Steve. Thanks for the chuckle ... :-)

Direct link | Posted on Aug 28, 2015 at 13:58 UTC
In reply to:

graybalanced: Always secure your camera. Don't take safety for granite...

Use Google Translate, German to English :-)

Direct link | Posted on Aug 28, 2015 at 04:44 UTC
On Under the hood: A closer look at the Sony a7R II article (590 comments in total)
In reply to:

sh10453: I am hoping that when a production copy is reviewed, DPR will put some significant effort observing and measuring the camera's internal temperature.
There is some talk here and there about the camera generating excessive heat.

LOL ... Likewise, I'm sure you can search and find it :)

OK, I'll be nice. See this report:
http://www.newsshooter.com/2015/08/02/sony-a7r-ii-part-iii-5-axis-stabilisation-and-heat-issues-going-handheld-to-tell-the-story-of-a-london-busker/

Direct link | Posted on Aug 23, 2015 at 02:57 UTC
On Under the hood: A closer look at the Sony a7R II article (590 comments in total)
In reply to:

sh10453: I am hoping that when a production copy is reviewed, DPR will put some significant effort observing and measuring the camera's internal temperature.
There is some talk here and there about the camera generating excessive heat.

Show me your data.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 22, 2015 at 22:32 UTC
In reply to:

graybalanced: Always secure your camera. Don't take safety for granite...

You mean for granited

Direct link | Posted on Aug 22, 2015 at 15:47 UTC
On iFixit tears down Sony's new a7R II to find its secrets article (290 comments in total)
In reply to:

jorg14: A lot of people seem to think this camera is built cheap. If you were to look at the cars of yesteryear, you'd find heavy rugged parts. Yet they broke often, required a lot of service and really didn't work very well compared to modern cars. As a former machinery designer, I'd hate to second guess Sony's engineers on this cameras longevity. We certainly know it works well. I'd wager it will last a while too. Probably longer than the consumer will want to keep it.

OK jorg14,
I am starting tonight to wish my 5D will last forever, so I can get ready for a new camera :-)

Direct link | Posted on Aug 22, 2015 at 00:05 UTC

Doubtful claim, especially "breaking the granite" part.
If that part wasn't there, one could say "maybe", and that the owner got lucky that the hood is what hit the ground and absorbed all the energy from the fall.
The added spice made the story less believable.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 21, 2015 at 23:37 UTC as 17th comment | 4 replies
In reply to:

sh10453: Congratulations to Canon.
No doubt they are now celebrating, and maybe having a "small" party.
Quite an achievement to win both, the professional and the prosumer camera categories, as well as the professional lens category!!
Let's hope that these awards will not make Canon overconfident and sleep longer on sensor development.
Would be nice if Canon would surprise the world next year with a "pro image sensor of the year" award!!
OK, it's wishful thinking.

The way I see it is that it has always been a tough race.
One comes out with the best camera for a certain year, the other comes out with a lot better one the following year, and so on.
Remember when Kodak came up with a 0.5 mp (500 kp) in the late 1990s?
It made news back then.
Competition is good for us, consumers.

It's a bit naive to say "the best camera". There are plenty of "best cameras". It depends on the category, the need, what it is used for, etc.
A 50 megapixel camera aimed at landscape photography (and rated as the best for the category) would not be the best camera for a sports photographer.

If you are absolutely happy with your camera, just call it the camera of the decade, and make it the no. 1 winner every year and forget the awards from EISA.

I love competition. So I'm waiting to see the camera that'll beat the heck out of Sony's latest kid on the block, the R-II.
Would it be the EOS 5D-IV? We'll have to wait & see.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 19, 2015 at 17:36 UTC
On Under the hood: A closer look at the Sony a7R II article (590 comments in total)
In reply to:

sh10453: I am hoping that when a production copy is reviewed, DPR will put some significant effort observing and measuring the camera's internal temperature.
There is some talk here and there about the camera generating excessive heat.

The heat issue becomes a major concern if it is still there when the camera is released (production cameras).
That's what I started talking about in this thread.
I am not too concerned about prototype copies.

As an electrical engineer by profession, it is hard to imagine how the heat issue will be resolved here, considering the size of the camera body, and the processing power, support electronics, sensor, etc., without turning off certain video features.

Space (body size), while desirable here to the consumer, is a nightmare for such powerful and complex electronics.
Sony may eventually (future) have to use larger bodies for their high-end cameras.

If Sony cannot resolve the "excessive" heat issue that shuts the camera down after about 15-18 minutes of 4K video in the production camera, then it becomes "Houston: We Have A Problem!" ...

Direct link | Posted on Aug 19, 2015 at 12:59 UTC
On Under the hood: A closer look at the Sony a7R II article (590 comments in total)
In reply to:

sh10453: I am hoping that when a production copy is reviewed, DPR will put some significant effort observing and measuring the camera's internal temperature.
There is some talk here and there about the camera generating excessive heat.

@Francis
All electronic devices, not just cameras, generate heat.
That was not the issue. My concern was "excessive" heat.

"EXCESSIVE" heat is a different story.

The camera is not out yet, so I'm not prepared to make an unfair judgment in advance, but I guess you somehow have access to one.
I'll let DPR handle the testing.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 19, 2015 at 03:49 UTC
On Samsung introduces PM1633a, world's first 2.5" 16TB SSD article (119 comments in total)
In reply to:

forpetessake: Nice. If you have a high-res. modern camera that can survive 100000 shutter actuations and you save every raw file, this drive would outlast 4 or more such cameras.

No sane camera manufacturer will do such a storage scheme.
They already have enough liability with removable disks as they exist today, and that's why the high-end cameras have dual drives (to guard against the failure of a disk).
Disk capacity will increase, of course, to meet the demands of 4K video, but will still be removable as it exists today for the foreseeable future.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 18, 2015 at 23:14 UTC

Duh, what is new here? Didn't we know about jpg's lossy compression back in the 1990s?
Upload the same original (lossless) PNG file a thousand times, and it will look like the first picture in this matrix, after one conversion/compression.

Even photo editors save a jpg file at 85% quality, unless you change the defaults.
I made a presentation about this back in 2000 to show photographers what happens if you keep saving an image using a photo editor, and showed the image quality after 10, 20, ..., and 50 saves (at the default 85% compression).

Download the first jpg file from Instagram, and then upload it, it will be compressed again, now a 2nd compression. So now you have 85% of the first 85% of the original PNG file, which is now at 72.25% of the original quality.
Keep repeating the process, and you can do the math. 1.06% of original quality after 28 times!
Here I assumed Instagram compresses at 85% of the original quality.

It's amusing though if you are bored.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 18, 2015 at 23:05 UTC as 25th comment | 2 replies
On Under the hood: A closer look at the Sony a7R II article (590 comments in total)

I am hoping that when a production copy is reviewed, DPR will put some significant effort observing and measuring the camera's internal temperature.
There is some talk here and there about the camera generating excessive heat.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 18, 2015 at 20:20 UTC as 38th comment | 13 replies
Total: 251, showing: 1 – 20
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