dccdp

dccdp

Works as a software engineer
Joined on Apr 1, 2008

Comments

Total: 155, showing: 1 – 20
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On Week in Review: To boldly go article (66 comments in total)
In reply to:

Wubslin: How much are the taxpayers on the hook for this particular exercise in adventurism?

@Wubslin: Yes it is, because "taxpayers" as a whole have neither the expertise nor the scientific understanding to be able to decide what are the avenues science should pursue long term. Common taxpayers will never understand why, for instance, math research is good for their well being, and if asked, they may just as well decide to end it all as it doesn't help them cook their next pizza.

Real science is hard, and most people will never understand its significance or priorities, so they shouldn't interfere.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 18, 2015 at 17:48 UTC
On Week in Review: To boldly go article (66 comments in total)
In reply to:

Wubslin: How much are the taxpayers on the hook for this particular exercise in adventurism?

Yes, profit, there's nothing else out there. (he doesn't seem to get it, apparently)

Direct link | Posted on Jul 18, 2015 at 16:41 UTC
On Week in Review: To boldly go article (66 comments in total)
In reply to:

Wubslin: How much are the taxpayers on the hook for this particular exercise in adventurism?

A lot less than the long chain of hard scientific work and sacrifices that made your country prosperous and civilized so that you are now able to be bored and use technology to post narrow-minded questions about the relevance of fundamental science research.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 18, 2015 at 16:32 UTC
On Lensbaby launches Creative Mobile Kit post (10 comments in total)

So, kitsch is now "creative"?

Direct link | Posted on Jul 10, 2015 at 11:01 UTC as 1st comment

They should just hang large and ugly copyright banners on those buildings, and nobody will ever photograph them. Copyright problem solved.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 6, 2015 at 21:05 UTC as 25th comment
In reply to:

ConanFujiX: One day someone will copyright the air that we need to breathe.

@guyrawkes. Not really, that's a tax for storing your car's waste.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 6, 2015 at 19:47 UTC
In reply to:

Atomez: Leica camera bodies, mechanics and lenses are made in Vila Nova de Famalicão by Leica Portugal. Then they are expedited to Germany where the electronics from Japan are added, as well as the Leica logo and "Made in Germany"...

My mistake, sorry. Still, if you wanted to point out an error you could have been a bit more constructive about it. For instance, you could have simply included a reference like this:

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/expedite

Direct link | Posted on Jun 5, 2015 at 15:28 UTC
In reply to:

Atomez: Leica camera bodies, mechanics and lenses are made in Vila Nova de Famalicão by Leica Portugal. Then they are expedited to Germany where the electronics from Japan are added, as well as the Leica logo and "Made in Germany"...

Aberaeron, it must be really nice to be smug about how fluent you are in your own native language, isn't it?

Direct link | Posted on Jun 5, 2015 at 11:15 UTC

This is the weirdest justification for snobbery I've ever read.

Just face it: if there really is a practical value to this type of camera, the market will request it, and other companies will start make it in volumes so that in two years such tools will be sold at affordable prices. But I'm afraid this is not about practical value, and this kind of tool is not really needed by photographers or artists. This is only a collector piece, it's about snobbery, and about throwing away money just to get a fabricated feeling of being special and unique. They might as well have printed a limited edition stamp with "Monochrom" written in gold letters on its face, and the effect would have been the same.

When you go to an art gallery, you don't care what brand of paint has the artist used. You just look at the painting and value its message.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 4, 2015 at 12:55 UTC as 19th comment | 12 replies
In reply to:

princewolf: Yet another 1/2.3'' tiny sensor camera...

The answer is: why not?

Direct link | Posted on Mar 2, 2015 at 19:47 UTC
In reply to:

justmeMN: I can see why a startup would want to enter the thriving and growing camera industry - oh wait. :-)

They hope to be bought by some rich company that may consider taking something like this to the market. You won't find many current startups with a business plan other than being bought by the billionaires.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 24, 2015 at 22:22 UTC
In reply to:

plantdoc: Does this mean that Sony will disappear from AV receivers, headphones, movie disk players etc? More of a concern to me than cameras because I don't own any Sony cameras and probably won't buy any at retail price. Do they still make TVs? Another market they were going to abandon.
Greg

Have you ever tried a current Philips TV? They are awful: slow interface, limited options, behave like second grade Chinese gadgets. Hope that Sony will not destroy their brand as Philips did. Because nowadays, as a consumer brand, Philips doesn't differentiate much from the cheap generic brands out there.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 24, 2015 at 00:12 UTC
On Accessory Review: Drobo Mini RAID article (149 comments in total)

I doubt there are many fields where the phrase "too much storage" does apply :)

Excellent review, thanks al lot dpr! Fine device, although the price is a bit too high.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 14, 2014 at 20:09 UTC as 42nd comment
In reply to:

DaveE1: I understand that the monkey is filing a "Forget Me" takedown request following the new European Court ruling. Get your comments in quickly. This article may not be here for long.

I thought this type of photographers were already EU citizens, and MEPs, but they are better known by their political orientation (I didn't quite get it -- is it far right, or far rage or something?)

Direct link | Posted on Aug 7, 2014 at 14:03 UTC
In reply to:

D1N0: Monkey's cannot own copyright, the photographer dit not intend de monkey to make pictures when it grabbed it's camera. So no copyright laws apply. The photographer should have given a different spin to his story. He gave the camera the the monkey in order for it to make selfies for the photographer.

@vfunct: Well, let's apply your logic. A photog. wants to shoot monkeys. You happen to be around his location and take a picture. He owns it, because "he intended to take it". Right?

Now, indeed, the monkey isn't human. What is a monkey, then? It's a force of nature, so it has no rights. Does the force of nature own the photo? No. Does the photog.? No, because the photo "owes its form to a force of nature". Conclusion: public domain.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 7, 2014 at 12:40 UTC
In reply to:

DaveE1: I understand that the monkey is filing a "Forget Me" takedown request following the new European Court ruling. Get your comments in quickly. This article may not be here for long.

Sorry, but that monkey is not an EU citizen.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 7, 2014 at 12:35 UTC
In reply to:

Stu 5: This could open up a can of worms. The BBC and National Geographic use motion triggers all the time for their wildlife work. Does that mean because the animal triggered the camera that the photos or footage is therefore in the public domain? How many wildlife photographers will use a motion triggered set up where they do not actually take the photo but the animal does?

The internet is not made only of photography sites. And the photog specifically targeted wider popularity with this stunt, and has received what he actually deserved. Internet fame is a double-edged sword, and serious artists should know better than relying on these kinds of shortcuts. Real fame is painstakingly built, it doesn't come automatically from Facebook likes.

But really, which "serious photography sites" do you refer to?

Direct link | Posted on Aug 7, 2014 at 12:26 UTC
In reply to:

dccdp: "Dear Photographer,

A monkey you were photographing stole your camera and hit me in the head with it, causing me injury.

I demand immediate compensation, as you are definitely liable, per your own logic."

Using the photographer's arguments works both ways, eh?

I'm only saying that the photographer isn't the author of the action, therefore is neither liable, nor has any rights about it.

And, as stated in the article, copyright law specifically covers works "owing [their] form to the forces of nature and lacking human authorship". If a monkey grabbing a camera without provocation or set-up isn't a force of nature, what is?

Direct link | Posted on Aug 7, 2014 at 11:57 UTC
In reply to:

Stu 5: This could open up a can of worms. The BBC and National Geographic use motion triggers all the time for their wildlife work. Does that mean because the animal triggered the camera that the photos or footage is therefore in the public domain? How many wildlife photographers will use a motion triggered set up where they do not actually take the photo but the animal does?

Come on, the monkey grabbed a camera, and pressed the shutter button! It is far from being the same case as using motion triggers, the camera wasn't set up to shoot that way.

There's no can of worms here. It's only a photographer that doesn't want to accept that he can't take credit for something that he didn't do. And he's angry because he became the laughing object of the entire internet, as "his" most popular photo was actually taken by an ape. :)

Direct link | Posted on Aug 7, 2014 at 11:50 UTC

"Dear Photographer,

A monkey you were photographing stole your camera and hit me in the head with it, causing me injury.

I demand immediate compensation, as you are definitely liable, per your own logic."

Using the photographer's arguments works both ways, eh?

Direct link | Posted on Aug 6, 2014 at 23:48 UTC as 473rd comment | 2 replies
Total: 155, showing: 1 – 20
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