nathantw

Lives in United States United States
Joined on Jun 11, 2009

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Total: 157, showing: 21 – 40
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Who pays the tax on that wonderful high-end medium format camera? The photographer, of course.

Link | Posted on Jan 16, 2016 at 15:35 UTC as 25th comment | 14 replies

So, is this like a GoPro camera where you take it with you to shoot everything? That's the impression I got with this video.

I really, really liked that video shot in the helicopter when they're following that train. That was a unique view that I've never seen before. Very cool.

Link | Posted on Jan 16, 2016 at 04:08 UTC as 3rd comment
On article Cinetics Axis360 review (70 comments in total)
In reply to:

brittonx: Um... What about GigaPan? They are pretty affordable...

I actually own a Gigapan Epic 100 and a Epic Pro and the Pro. The Epic 100 is light and portable but the downside is that you can't do night photography and the stepping increments aren't as fine as the Pro. The Epic Pro is very, very nice and versatile, but very big and heavy though I can put up to 15 pounds onto it, which I have.

Link | Posted on Jan 1, 2016 at 07:09 UTC
On article Video: a look at the Sony Cyber-shot RX1R II (125 comments in total)

What did he say? A couple firmware upgrades from greatness? LOL. From what I heard people who buy this will be lucky to get even one firmware upgrade.

Link | Posted on Dec 15, 2015 at 14:43 UTC as 35th comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

Denis of Whidbey Island: Would knowledge of large format black and white photography with a digital insert qualify?

Only if you can handle a traditional darkroom also.

Link | Posted on Dec 10, 2015 at 08:21 UTC
In reply to:

nunatak: my Gitzo's are keepers. but so too are my Benro and Sirui carbon legs. they're all solid.

Gitzo may add an iteration of "finish" to their products over most competitors, but when it comes to the critical functions of weight/support, Gitzo only equals some of their much less expensive Chinese made cousins.

all things being equal, i'd prefer to blow my budget on better glass than pay tribute to a slightly better finished set of legs. JMO.

I have a Gitzo 224 and a Bogen (Manfrotto) 3028 that I purchased at the same time. That combo has worked very well for me through the decades. It has been one of the sturdiest platforms I've used without any play or slop. If I want to use the camera in very low positions I could mount the head to the bottom of the center console and still have the camera in an upright position and not upside down. Very nice combination, but heavy at 5 pounds.

Link | Posted on Aug 20, 2015 at 04:18 UTC
In reply to:

nathantw: Wow. Look at those prices. Yikes!

Don't get me wrong. I purchased my Gitzo 224 in 1983 and have been using it as my main tripod since. It has served me very well and will continue to do so for decades to come. It'll probably outlive me. Using the inflation calculator I paid what came out to about $500 back then. So, yes, these are lifetime types of purchases provided you don't do anything really weird to break them. I just saw these prices for today and to me they're still "yikes." That's expensive.

Link | Posted on Aug 19, 2015 at 18:55 UTC

Wow. Look at those prices. Yikes!

Link | Posted on Aug 19, 2015 at 16:38 UTC as 11th comment | 5 replies
On article Gitzo introduces three new Center Ball Heads (41 comments in total)

Love the Gitzo I purchased in 1984. Still using it today as my main tripod.

Link | Posted on Aug 14, 2015 at 06:13 UTC as 8th comment | 2 replies
On article Fujifilm announces X-T1 IR for infrared photography (203 comments in total)
In reply to:

nathantw: I find it interesting that in the old days of film if we had a camera that had an infrared dot on the focus scale all we needed to do was buy a $15 (I'm exaggerating) roll of infrared film and a filter. Then there was Nikon's digital camera, the Coolpix 950 (I think), that did IR really well. Now you can get digital IR from Fuji for $1700. Man, inflation is a b*tch.

You did it yourself? Was it hard?

Link | Posted on Aug 3, 2015 at 14:18 UTC
On article Fujifilm announces X-T1 IR for infrared photography (203 comments in total)

I find it interesting that in the old days of film if we had a camera that had an infrared dot on the focus scale all we needed to do was buy a $15 (I'm exaggerating) roll of infrared film and a filter. Then there was Nikon's digital camera, the Coolpix 950 (I think), that did IR really well. Now you can get digital IR from Fuji for $1700. Man, inflation is a b*tch.

Link | Posted on Aug 3, 2015 at 14:10 UTC as 37th comment | 6 replies
In reply to:

Peiasdf: Was this back when photographer still have access to Whitehouse or are these staff photographer's work?

Also. I can only imagine how much better the quality would be if a modern FF was used without flash.

I wouldn't douibt if many of these were likely shot with a Leica M.

Link | Posted on Jul 25, 2015 at 19:48 UTC
In reply to:

nathantw: Actually looks good. Thanks for the samples. One tip, though, 85mm is good for closeup portraits and the 24mm isn't.

Barney Britton, you definitely called it. ;-)

Link | Posted on Jul 24, 2015 at 18:48 UTC
In reply to:

nathantw: Actually looks good. Thanks for the samples. One tip, though, 85mm is good for closeup portraits and the 24mm isn't.

Holy smokes, Rishi Sanyal. Did you drink too much coffee? Calm down.

I guess you didn't see what lens I shoot the most with, it was at the end of my post, it's a 24mm lens. Yes, a 24mm lens where people's heads are big and their feet are small in full body closeup photos. Where faces are elongated and noses are Pinocchico-lying large in closeup head shots. You didn't see portraits of people in my gallery (at least I have some photos in my gallery) because I don't post photos of people if they aren't in a public area where they expect to be photograph. I've been shooting with the 24mm for over 30 years so I know that focal length's strengths and weaknesses pretty well. Assuming I'm narrow-minded is, well, ass/u/m(e)-ing.

The example photo of the different focal lengths isn't my photo. I just grabbed the link from a quick search.

By the way, not that you would care what I think, but I like the photos you posted in your example to your prove your point.

Link | Posted on Jul 24, 2015 at 17:24 UTC
In reply to:

nathantw: Actually looks good. Thanks for the samples. One tip, though, 85mm is good for closeup portraits and the 24mm isn't.

Okay, Rishi Sanyal. To each his own. I'm sure your models just love the pronounced noses and elongated faces. When's your next portrait seminar?

I'm sure you already know, but for those that don't here are samples of the differences between focal lengths. http://johncarnessali.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/Portrait-Focal-Length-II.jpg

That said, ask me what my favorite focal length is. Go ahead, ask. Yeah, 24mm. It's my most used lens for everything.

Link | Posted on Jul 23, 2015 at 06:54 UTC
In reply to:

Mister Joseph: Another massive lens for my massive FF camera to compliment my other massive lenses.

And don't forget your massive backpack/camera bag and tripod that your massive FF camera kit will need.

Link | Posted on Jul 22, 2015 at 21:37 UTC

Actually looks good. Thanks for the samples. One tip, though, 85mm is good for closeup portraits and the 24mm isn't.

Link | Posted on Jul 22, 2015 at 21:36 UTC as 48th comment | 19 replies

This is really cool. I enjoyed it.

As for using the D810 and sticking out like a sore thumb, he probably wouldn't if he decided to use a small prime lens instead of a hulking giant lens like the 24-70mm f/2.8.

Link | Posted on Jul 14, 2015 at 15:39 UTC as 11th comment | 1 reply
On article Beyond the table top: 5 mini tripods reviewed (192 comments in total)
In reply to:

smozes: In my opinion, the Joby SLR Zoom model could've been a better match, since it is smaller. However, it uses an integrated ball head which is not compatible with any other plate.

I was really hoping to just carry the Joby SLR Zoom, and be able to mount my MILC to either it or a CapturePro clip, but because of the the ball head, I can't and had to settle for the Joby Focus, which is huge and clearly meant for professional DSLRs.

I agree that it sags after adjustment, especially if the camera is in the vertical position. I actually wondered how they could call it a "DSLR Zoom" when it didn't do what it was supposed to with a zoom lens.

Link | Posted on Jul 7, 2015 at 17:28 UTC
On article Beyond the table top: 5 mini tripods reviewed (192 comments in total)
In reply to:

smozes: In my opinion, the Joby SLR Zoom model could've been a better match, since it is smaller. However, it uses an integrated ball head which is not compatible with any other plate.

I was really hoping to just carry the Joby SLR Zoom, and be able to mount my MILC to either it or a CapturePro clip, but because of the the ball head, I can't and had to settle for the Joby Focus, which is huge and clearly meant for professional DSLRs.

You are aware you can take the ball head off and replace it with whatever you'd like, right? I use the SLR Zoom and change the head periodically.

Link | Posted on Jul 1, 2015 at 19:51 UTC
Total: 157, showing: 21 – 40
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