Simon Joinson

Simon Joinson

DPReview Administrator
Lives in United States SEATTLE, WA, United States
Works as a Editor, writer, photographer
Has a website at www.dpreview.com
Joined on Jul 9, 2002
About me:

http://www.cff.org/

Editorial content

Total: 282, showing: 41 – 50
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Just Posted: Olympus E-30 Review
Just Posted: Our full review of the Olympus E-30. The E-30 is the long-awaited 'tweener' model that fills the gap in the E-system range between the entry-level models and the flagship E-3. With a new 12 megapixel sensor, a selection of unique in-camera creative options and a wealth of features, the E-30 looks very promising on paper, but does it deliver in use? Find out in our in-depth review after the link.
Olympus E-30  Review
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The E-30 is the long-awaited high-end enthusiast model that fills the gap in the Olympus E-Series lineup between the E-520 and the ostensibly professional level E-3. Such is the pace of change in the digital camera market that the new model leapfrogs the E-3 by offering a higher pixel count (12MP), larger screen and improved contrast detect AF system - as well as introducing several novel features including a digital spirit level, multi exposures, aspect ratio options and a handful of built-in special image effects ('Art Filters' as Olympus calls them). It loses the E-3's class-leading weather sealing and has a slightly smaller optical viewfinder, but otherwise offers almost exactly the same features and performance in a slightly lighter, very slightly smaller and - at launch - similarly priced body.
Just posted! Canon EOS 5D Mark II review
Just posted! Our in-depth review of the Canon EOS 5D Mark II, long-awaited successor to the popular EOS 5D, the first 'compact' full frame digital SLR. The Mark II ups the pixel count to 21 million and comes complete with a long list of upgrades, enhancements and new features - including live view and HD video capture. Unlike the original 5D the new model faces some stiff competition from the likes of Nikon and Sony - and the 5D is quite a tough act to follow... so find out how it fared in our full test after the link.
Canon EOS 5D Mark II In-depth Review
Back in August 2005 Canon 'defined a new DSLR category' (their words) with the EOS 5D. Unlike any previous 'full frame' sensor camera, the 5D was the first with a compact body (i.e. not having an integral vertical grip) and has since then proved to be very popular, perhaps because if you wanted a full frame DSLR to use with your Canon lenses and you didn't want the chunky EOS-1D style body then the EOS 5D has been your only choice. Three years on and two competitors have turned up in the shape of the Nikon D700 and Sony DSLR-A900, and Canon clearly believes it's time for a refresh.
Just posted! Panasonic G1 review
Just posted! Our in-depth review of the Panasonic Lumix DMC-G1, the world's first 'Micro Four Thirds' system camera. Updating the digital SLR (DSLR) for the 21st century, the mirrorless G1 replaces the tried-and-tested optical viewfinder with a new high resolution electronic version and aims to offer the quality and versatility of an SLR combined with the user-friendly ease of use of a compact camera. Does it succeed? Find out in our review after the link. Apologies for the delay on this one; the Christmas holidays, group tests and challenges launch got in the way, but full reviews are back up to speed now.
Panasonic Lumix G1 Review
When you consider the incredible flexibility offered by digital capture (unencumbered by the physical need to put the film behind the lens and to advance it frame by frame) it's perhaps surprising that the digital interchangeable lens camera has remained so firmly rooted in a basic design that hasn't changed since the 1950's. The single lens reflex does its job very well, but building a camera around a mirror box seriously ties the designer's hands - not only in the physical size and shape of the body, but in the lenses too (the distance to the sensor means retrofocus designs are needed to overcome the distance from the sensor to the flange).
Super Zoom Camera Group Test
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Just posted! The fifth and final installment of our compact camera roundup looks at 'big zoom' SLR-styled compact cameras. The appeal of being able to shoot everything from a sweeping landscape to a tightly framed telephoto shot with a single affordable - and relatively compact - camera is easy to understand; finding your way through the sea of seemingly very similar models is more of a challenge. We decided to look at seven of the latest models to find out if they are as similar in performance as they are in specification and design.

'Super Zoom' Camera Group Test (Q1 2009)
You don't need to be on safari to appreciate the benefits of a big zoom range (in fact the target audience for many of the cameras in this group is what's known in the US as the 'soccer mom' market), and in the last few years the super zoom sector has grown dramatically with at least one model in most manufacturers' lineup. The appeal of being able to shoot everything from a sweeping landscape or cramped interior to a tightly framed telephoto shot with a single affordable - and relatively compact - camera is easy to understand; finding your way through the sea of seemingly very similar models is more of a challenge. We decided to look at seven of the latest models to find out if they are as similar in performance as they are in specification and design.
Enthusiast Compact Camera Group Test

Just posted! The fourth (and penultimate) installment of our compact camera roundup looks at the top-end cameras aimed at the experienced photographer. These enthusiast cameras offer a bit more flexibility than the cameras we've looked at so far, whether that's the inclusion of a large zoom range or a greater degree of manual control. Follow the link to find what we made of them.

Prosumer Camera Group Test Q4 2008
Since the introduction of the affordable digital SLR a few years back industry observers have been predicting the demise of what used to be called the 'prosumer camera'; the highly specified compact with features aimed at the more serious photographer. A few years ago you could easily pay $700 for a top end compact; today that will buy you a decent SLR with a kit zoom, and it became obvious that the serious compact sector had to adapt or die - fortunately the manufacturers chose the former option.