Lee Jay

Lee Jay

Lives in United States CO, United States
Works as a Electrical Engineer / Wind Energy Research
Joined on Oct 17, 2003

Comments

Total: 680, showing: 21 – 40
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On article Primer: Why would I buy a mirrorless camera? (551 comments in total)
In reply to:

Lee Jay: Size - disadvantage. Smaller is worse, not better, as it makes them harder to hold and harder to use due to less room for a grip and less room for controls.

Autofocus - disadvantage. As your own article showed:

http://www.dpreview.com/articles/5684109129/lucky-number-7-shooting-pro-sports-with-the-sony-a7r-ii

even the A7R II is basically a single AF point relatively poor AF camera in challenging conditions.

Video - tie. I can and do use an eye-level viewfinder on my SLR for video, and I get to use Canon's very smooth dual-pixel phase-detection AF as well as the smooth and quiet STM lenses.

System - disadvantage. Way fewer modern options in all respects.

" the highest continuous frame rate you can shoot with AF is 3 fps."

"The devil is in the details of the implementations: while shooting in single point, continuous tracking autofocus modes the A-series’ focus can keep up with certain sporting subjects – it’s just whether or not the sluggish, in-EVF image playback during continuous shooting will allow you to make the image you desire when shooting a burst."

So, it's a single-point 3fps camera with continuous AF and a sluggish viewfinder. I just retired my 11 year old 9 focus point 5fps continuous AF camera with instant viewfinder.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 8, 2015 at 15:46 UTC
On article Primer: Why would I buy a mirrorless camera? (551 comments in total)
In reply to:

Lee Jay: Size - disadvantage. Smaller is worse, not better, as it makes them harder to hold and harder to use due to less room for a grip and less room for controls.

Autofocus - disadvantage. As your own article showed:

http://www.dpreview.com/articles/5684109129/lucky-number-7-shooting-pro-sports-with-the-sony-a7r-ii

even the A7R II is basically a single AF point relatively poor AF camera in challenging conditions.

Video - tie. I can and do use an eye-level viewfinder on my SLR for video, and I get to use Canon's very smooth dual-pixel phase-detection AF as well as the smooth and quiet STM lenses.

System - disadvantage. Way fewer modern options in all respects.

My hands aren't getting smaller, so neither are my cameras.
As the article I referenced pointed out, the AF in that camera isn't good compared to even modest SLRs.
Lest you forget who made the first 4k SLR? Canon did, and with a great many stabilized lens options.
Might take them, but it won't operate them natively.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 8, 2015 at 01:15 UTC
On article Primer: Why would I buy a mirrorless camera? (551 comments in total)

Size - disadvantage. Smaller is worse, not better, as it makes them harder to hold and harder to use due to less room for a grip and less room for controls.

Autofocus - disadvantage. As your own article showed:

http://www.dpreview.com/articles/5684109129/lucky-number-7-shooting-pro-sports-with-the-sony-a7r-ii

even the A7R II is basically a single AF point relatively poor AF camera in challenging conditions.

Video - tie. I can and do use an eye-level viewfinder on my SLR for video, and I get to use Canon's very smooth dual-pixel phase-detection AF as well as the smooth and quiet STM lenses.

System - disadvantage. Way fewer modern options in all respects.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 8, 2015 at 00:57 UTC as 90th comment | 9 replies
On Connect post Google launches Cardboard Camera VR app for Android (20 comments in total)
In reply to:

Lee Jay: I thought everyone gave up on 3D.

Go try to find a 3D TV for your house.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 5, 2015 at 14:47 UTC
On Connect post Google launches Cardboard Camera VR app for Android (20 comments in total)

I thought everyone gave up on 3D.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 5, 2015 at 10:35 UTC as 9th comment | 4 replies
On article PIX 2015: Robert Hurt and the hidden universe (59 comments in total)

Finally, one worth watching and pictures worth looking at!!!

Direct link | Posted on Nov 29, 2015 at 15:49 UTC as 15th comment

I think all but number 1 would be much better in color.

I don't get the fascination with making the viewer feel color blind.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 14, 2015 at 17:27 UTC as 43rd comment | 1 reply

The assumption being, the purpose of photography is to create art.

I have only recently realized that many, even most photographers think this way.

I've been shooting for over 35 years and I never really thought of photography as a way to create art, at least for me.

I guess I'm now wondering if there aren't two totally different types of photography - artistic and documentary. I've always thought of photography as a way to document events, not as a way to create art. For that reason, very little of what he said made much sense to me.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 8, 2015 at 17:03 UTC as 5th comment | 6 replies
In reply to:

Lee Jay: 700 shots on 3 batteries? I shot 2,250 shots at an airshow on one battery.

700/3 = 233 shots per battery. I wasn't dead at 2,250 and some of those were videos, so it looks like the battery life difference is about a factor of 10 between this camera and my 7D Mark II.

I usually carry 3 batteries. No way I'm buying a camera for which I'd need to carry 30!

I was using autofocus and IS the entire time, review was on, and I even shot some videos totaling several minutes on that one single charge.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 6, 2015 at 00:05 UTC
In reply to:

shadowfax123: I think people really miss the point of speciality, niche cameras such as the A7RII, D810, and 5DS. Simply, they are designed for fine detail work. Period! I have had people come up to me with a 5DS or a A7RII and show me pictures of wildlife, sports, and events. Great! I'm glad they can get some good shots. At least Canon states the obvious about the 5DS "Perfect for commercial and fine art photography." Sony really doesn't indicate the limitations of the A7RII for sport/event photography.

These are all great cameras, but they are simply not designed as generalist, all-around cameras. Of course, you can use them in that way. However, I'd rather go on vacation with with my D750 than my very limited D800. That is, if I could only take one camera. So many people on the Nikon forums declare the 810 the best Nikon camera. I think it's because it's the only camera they own. Then they go and slap a 24-85 on it. Yikes! LOL.

Essentially the article said this is a 3fps single-AF point camera with no fast way to select your one AF point, a lousy viewfinder with a lot of blackout, terrible battery life, and a poor selection of native lenses. So, what you are essentially getting is a Rebel 300D with a defective mirror return assembly, a battery on its last legs, and a terrific sensor.

Sounds like a fine camera for people who shoot slow moving or stationary subjects from not too far away, and who don't do a lot of shooting. That's not me, to say the least.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 4, 2015 at 23:47 UTC
In reply to:

shadowfax123: I think people really miss the point of speciality, niche cameras such as the A7RII, D810, and 5DS. Simply, they are designed for fine detail work. Period! I have had people come up to me with a 5DS or a A7RII and show me pictures of wildlife, sports, and events. Great! I'm glad they can get some good shots. At least Canon states the obvious about the 5DS "Perfect for commercial and fine art photography." Sony really doesn't indicate the limitations of the A7RII for sport/event photography.

These are all great cameras, but they are simply not designed as generalist, all-around cameras. Of course, you can use them in that way. However, I'd rather go on vacation with with my D750 than my very limited D800. That is, if I could only take one camera. So many people on the Nikon forums declare the 810 the best Nikon camera. I think it's because it's the only camera they own. Then they go and slap a 24-85 on it. Yikes! LOL.

Yeah...American football - where you play most of the game with your hands not your feet, and where the ball doesn't roll.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 4, 2015 at 21:57 UTC
In reply to:

shadowfax123: I think people really miss the point of speciality, niche cameras such as the A7RII, D810, and 5DS. Simply, they are designed for fine detail work. Period! I have had people come up to me with a 5DS or a A7RII and show me pictures of wildlife, sports, and events. Great! I'm glad they can get some good shots. At least Canon states the obvious about the 5DS "Perfect for commercial and fine art photography." Sony really doesn't indicate the limitations of the A7RII for sport/event photography.

These are all great cameras, but they are simply not designed as generalist, all-around cameras. Of course, you can use them in that way. However, I'd rather go on vacation with with my D750 than my very limited D800. That is, if I could only take one camera. So many people on the Nikon forums declare the 810 the best Nikon camera. I think it's because it's the only camera they own. Then they go and slap a 24-85 on it. Yikes! LOL.

I was talking about American football, as in the article. It's a pretty slow-moving sport overall.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 4, 2015 at 21:47 UTC
In reply to:

shadowfax123: I think people really miss the point of speciality, niche cameras such as the A7RII, D810, and 5DS. Simply, they are designed for fine detail work. Period! I have had people come up to me with a 5DS or a A7RII and show me pictures of wildlife, sports, and events. Great! I'm glad they can get some good shots. At least Canon states the obvious about the 5DS "Perfect for commercial and fine art photography." Sony really doesn't indicate the limitations of the A7RII for sport/event photography.

These are all great cameras, but they are simply not designed as generalist, all-around cameras. Of course, you can use them in that way. However, I'd rather go on vacation with with my D750 than my very limited D800. That is, if I could only take one camera. So many people on the Nikon forums declare the 810 the best Nikon camera. I think it's because it's the only camera they own. Then they go and slap a 24-85 on it. Yikes! LOL.

I have shot some football. Relative to most of the things I shoot, it's a slow-moving, predictable sport. Most of the subjects I shoot are much more challenging than that.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 4, 2015 at 21:43 UTC
In reply to:

shadowfax123: I think people really miss the point of speciality, niche cameras such as the A7RII, D810, and 5DS. Simply, they are designed for fine detail work. Period! I have had people come up to me with a 5DS or a A7RII and show me pictures of wildlife, sports, and events. Great! I'm glad they can get some good shots. At least Canon states the obvious about the 5DS "Perfect for commercial and fine art photography." Sony really doesn't indicate the limitations of the A7RII for sport/event photography.

These are all great cameras, but they are simply not designed as generalist, all-around cameras. Of course, you can use them in that way. However, I'd rather go on vacation with with my D750 than my very limited D800. That is, if I could only take one camera. So many people on the Nikon forums declare the 810 the best Nikon camera. I think it's because it's the only camera they own. Then they go and slap a 24-85 on it. Yikes! LOL.

I read that comment. That's not even close to the situation I was describing. My most-used lens for the situations I described is the 70-200/2.8L IS II, and none of the situations I described were weddings, events or newborns with the exception of concerts.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 4, 2015 at 21:12 UTC

700 shots on 3 batteries? I shot 2,250 shots at an airshow on one battery.

700/3 = 233 shots per battery. I wasn't dead at 2,250 and some of those were videos, so it looks like the battery life difference is about a factor of 10 between this camera and my 7D Mark II.

I usually carry 3 batteries. No way I'm buying a camera for which I'd need to carry 30!

Direct link | Posted on Nov 4, 2015 at 20:31 UTC as 91st comment | 10 replies
In reply to:

shadowfax123: I think people really miss the point of speciality, niche cameras such as the A7RII, D810, and 5DS. Simply, they are designed for fine detail work. Period! I have had people come up to me with a 5DS or a A7RII and show me pictures of wildlife, sports, and events. Great! I'm glad they can get some good shots. At least Canon states the obvious about the 5DS "Perfect for commercial and fine art photography." Sony really doesn't indicate the limitations of the A7RII for sport/event photography.

These are all great cameras, but they are simply not designed as generalist, all-around cameras. Of course, you can use them in that way. However, I'd rather go on vacation with with my D750 than my very limited D800. That is, if I could only take one camera. So many people on the Nikon forums declare the 810 the best Nikon camera. I think it's because it's the only camera they own. Then they go and slap a 24-85 on it. Yikes! LOL.

"On a percentage basis, pro sports photography is the niche application. The A7Rii does everything else very well."

The thing is, even though I don't shoot pro sports, almost all of my daily shooting uses the same technology and technique as is used for pro sports. Whether it's my kids running around the yard, my daughter sliding down the slide at the park, singers dancing on a stage at a concert, going water skiing with the family, flying model airplanes or going to airshows, or visiting Disney attractions or shows, almost everything I shoot is moving quickly and erratically, and a lot of it is doing it in low-light.

For me, things that are not moving or are moving slowly are the niche application. 10%, maybe.

Life moves.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 4, 2015 at 20:16 UTC
On Connect post Macro stick-on lens brings close-up capability to smartphones (33 comments in total)

Macro capability is actually important to me in a cell phone camera. I use it combined with a magnifier application to pick splinters out of my hands and to examine solder joints to make sure they aren't cold. This is my number one use for a cell phone camera.

I've never actually taken a picture that way, though.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 3, 2015 at 23:34 UTC as 12th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

Lee Jay: I don't understand how this would work for R/C aircraft which don't have a model number and serial number on them (which is all 20 or so of mine). How would they be uniquely identified?

Okay, so what if I build one that uses a six-axis IMU, magnetic compass, barometer and no GPS. It'll still do autonomous heading, location and altitude hold, I still control it by radio control. No MAC address, no Unit ID.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 20, 2015 at 13:06 UTC
In reply to:

Lee Jay: I don't understand how this would work for R/C aircraft which don't have a model number and serial number on them (which is all 20 or so of mine). How would they be uniquely identified?

So, you're saying you'd have to register your home-built drone by GPS Unit ID since there's no serial number? How would you even find it if you weren't writing the control software and querying the chip?

Direct link | Posted on Oct 19, 2015 at 23:00 UTC
In reply to:

Lee Jay: I don't understand how this would work for R/C aircraft which don't have a model number and serial number on them (which is all 20 or so of mine). How would they be uniquely identified?

Why would a GPS receiver have a MAC address?

Direct link | Posted on Oct 19, 2015 at 22:23 UTC
Total: 680, showing: 21 – 40
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