Lee Jay

Lee Jay

Lives in United States CO, United States
Works as a Electrical Engineer / Wind Energy Research
Joined on Oct 17, 2003

Comments

Total: 552, showing: 21 – 40
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In reply to:

dash2k8: Outsell? I actually believe it. Mirrorless will be more appealing to the masses. Ma's and pa's looking for simple family photos will prefer the smaller, lighter and more portable options. And honestly, mirrorless is closing the performance gap to make it good enough for most consumers. Pros will never outnumber amateurs so I don't see why people don't think mirrorless will outsell DSLRs. I also don't understand why ppl are upset at this eventuality.

And that would be their phone or a basic compact, both mirrorless.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 14, 2015 at 02:13 UTC
In reply to:

CameraLabTester: When consumers (not professionals) consider SIZE as a major factor: MIRRORLESS will kick in.

Oops! It already has!

PROS: big and bulky

CONSUMERS: small, comfortable, and wise. (smart too)

.

Camera's have to fit my hands, and my hands aren't getting any smaller, same as my feet. I need my camera's to fit my hands, same as my shoes fit my feet. Sorry that got past you.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 14, 2015 at 02:08 UTC
In reply to:

dash2k8: Outsell? I actually believe it. Mirrorless will be more appealing to the masses. Ma's and pa's looking for simple family photos will prefer the smaller, lighter and more portable options. And honestly, mirrorless is closing the performance gap to make it good enough for most consumers. Pros will never outnumber amateurs so I don't see why people don't think mirrorless will outsell DSLRs. I also don't understand why ppl are upset at this eventuality.

Mirrorless already outsell SLRs, and always has - compact film cameras, compact digital cameras, phones, they're all mirrorless and all primarily designed for people who don't care about their photos.

Don't care. SLRs are simply better, and I do care about my photos.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 14, 2015 at 02:07 UTC
In reply to:

CameraLabTester: When consumers (not professionals) consider SIZE as a major factor: MIRRORLESS will kick in.

Oops! It already has!

PROS: big and bulky

CONSUMERS: small, comfortable, and wise. (smart too)

.

When consumers get wise, everyone will start wearing children's shoes. They're lighter, smaller, and cheaper.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 14, 2015 at 01:49 UTC
On Opinion: The myth of the upgrade path article (1409 comments in total)
In reply to:

babart: Richard's viewpoint is right on the money. In my humble opinion the only reason to currently move into full frame is to use a 24 to 28mm shift (or tilt/shift) lens for achitecture, so as to have the advantage of the moderate wide angle lens. Even then, it helps to have a slew of film (full-frame) lenses :). I'm in both camps and I'm buying a used A7 and a PK to Sony E adapter.

Other than that I can't see myself outgrowing my Fuji equipment in the near future. I can load an X-E1 body mounted with a 27mm pancake, and two excellent zooms of 18-55 and 55-200 in a case that's about 10 x 6 x 4 inches and weighs a bit over 3.5 pounds (1.5kg.) The image quality is superb, and I suspect it's the same with any APS-C system with a 16 - 18 mpix sensor and some decent lenses.

I have a friend that has a full-frame Nikon with a battery grip and both of the Nikon f/2.8 zooms (24-70 and 70-200.) He wonders why he's so tired at the end of his vacations. :)

Cheers,
BAB

I've been carrying an SLR, several lenses, and accessories around on trips since 1979 when I was a little kid. No trouble yet but you do need to carry it in a safe way. I used to use a backpack but now I use a ThinkTank ChangeUp waist pack which shares the load between both hips and both shoulders all at once.

Frankly, I don't even feel it. I've walked 15 miles a day 9 days in a row like that.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 12, 2015 at 14:01 UTC
On Opinion: The myth of the upgrade path article (1409 comments in total)
In reply to:

Lee Jay: It's okay to be wrong Richard, and you are.

My first purchase was a 10D. That led me to a 20D for its many in-body improvements. My basic two lenses were a 17-40L and a 28-135IS but I also had two others, the 50/1.8 and 75-300IS. However, I loved wide-angle, and none of these count, and the 75-300IS wasn't long enough or fast enough. So I bought a Sigma 15mm fisheye for the crop cameras and traded up to the 50/1.4. The fish on crop is like a 19mm rectilinear on full-frame which is sort-of wide. Note than none of these are crop-lenses, but all are usable on a crop-only system.

I then sold my 10D and bought a 5D, and I sold my 28-135IS and bought a 24-105L. Then I had really, really wide (full-frame fisheye on full-frame), wide (17-40L on full-frame), and walkaround (17-40L on crop, 24-105 on full-frame). I got rid of the 50/1.4 for an 85/1.8, and sold the 75-300IS for a 70-200/2.8 + TCs, all through a nice, continuous path, each step leading to the next.

So, it's no myth.

"It's the 'I won't buy APS-C lenses' and 'I won't buy a system without a full frame option' logic that I was mainly arguing against."

Missed this one.

For anyone that's seriously interested in photography, I strongly recommend against any system without a full frame upgrade option. If you buy a, say, m43 system and a bunch of accessories and then decided you really want a bigger sensor, you're stuck not only selling your body and maybe upgrading a lens or two, but all the accessories as well. When I bought my 10D I got a 550EX. I didn't need to sell it when I moved to full-frame. I also got a TC-80N3 remote. Again, I could continue to use it. Same with the flash extension cable, batteries, battery chargers, more flashes, all the gels I cut for my flashes, software, etc.

That's HUGE advantage of buying a system with a larger sensor upgrade option. HUGE. And it's a big reason I think 4/3 is a dead-end system and don't ever recommend it.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 10, 2015 at 19:55 UTC
On Opinion: The myth of the upgrade path article (1409 comments in total)
In reply to:

babart: Richard's viewpoint is right on the money. In my humble opinion the only reason to currently move into full frame is to use a 24 to 28mm shift (or tilt/shift) lens for achitecture, so as to have the advantage of the moderate wide angle lens. Even then, it helps to have a slew of film (full-frame) lenses :). I'm in both camps and I'm buying a used A7 and a PK to Sony E adapter.

Other than that I can't see myself outgrowing my Fuji equipment in the near future. I can load an X-E1 body mounted with a 27mm pancake, and two excellent zooms of 18-55 and 55-200 in a case that's about 10 x 6 x 4 inches and weighs a bit over 3.5 pounds (1.5kg.) The image quality is superb, and I suspect it's the same with any APS-C system with a 16 - 18 mpix sensor and some decent lenses.

I have a friend that has a full-frame Nikon with a battery grip and both of the Nikon f/2.8 zooms (24-70 and 70-200.) He wonders why he's so tired at the end of his vacations. :)

Cheers,
BAB

And I'm 5'6" and 150 and don't have a problem.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 10, 2015 at 03:33 UTC
On Opinion: The myth of the upgrade path article (1409 comments in total)
In reply to:

babart: Richard's viewpoint is right on the money. In my humble opinion the only reason to currently move into full frame is to use a 24 to 28mm shift (or tilt/shift) lens for achitecture, so as to have the advantage of the moderate wide angle lens. Even then, it helps to have a slew of film (full-frame) lenses :). I'm in both camps and I'm buying a used A7 and a PK to Sony E adapter.

Other than that I can't see myself outgrowing my Fuji equipment in the near future. I can load an X-E1 body mounted with a 27mm pancake, and two excellent zooms of 18-55 and 55-200 in a case that's about 10 x 6 x 4 inches and weighs a bit over 3.5 pounds (1.5kg.) The image quality is superb, and I suspect it's the same with any APS-C system with a 16 - 18 mpix sensor and some decent lenses.

I have a friend that has a full-frame Nikon with a battery grip and both of the Nikon f/2.8 zooms (24-70 and 70-200.) He wonders why he's so tired at the end of his vacations. :)

Cheers,
BAB

One moves to full-frame for the same reason one moves from an f/4.5 lens to a better f/2.8 lens, and it's the same gap.

If you don't need that, fine. But if you do...a stop is a stop, and full-frame is a little more than a stop.

And your friend needs to get in shape. Here's my vacation kit:

5D
24-105/4L IS
70-200/2.8L IS
35/1.4L
Sigma 15mm fisheye
2x teleconverter
Small flash
Four extra batteries
Seven extra cards
Mini tripod
Cleaning supplies
Remote release

No problem carrying that all day every day.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 10, 2015 at 00:52 UTC
On Opinion: The myth of the upgrade path article (1409 comments in total)
In reply to:

Lee Jay: It's okay to be wrong Richard, and you are.

My first purchase was a 10D. That led me to a 20D for its many in-body improvements. My basic two lenses were a 17-40L and a 28-135IS but I also had two others, the 50/1.8 and 75-300IS. However, I loved wide-angle, and none of these count, and the 75-300IS wasn't long enough or fast enough. So I bought a Sigma 15mm fisheye for the crop cameras and traded up to the 50/1.4. The fish on crop is like a 19mm rectilinear on full-frame which is sort-of wide. Note than none of these are crop-lenses, but all are usable on a crop-only system.

I then sold my 10D and bought a 5D, and I sold my 28-135IS and bought a 24-105L. Then I had really, really wide (full-frame fisheye on full-frame), wide (17-40L on full-frame), and walkaround (17-40L on crop, 24-105 on full-frame). I got rid of the 50/1.4 for an 85/1.8, and sold the 75-300IS for a 70-200/2.8 + TCs, all through a nice, continuous path, each step leading to the next.

So, it's no myth.

Well, that's the exact logic I followed. Notice that not one of the lenses I bought was EF-s.

Further, even if you do buy EF-s lenses, what's the big deal about selling them as you migrate to full-frame? The only thing that would make this something other than an "upgrade path" is if you are forced to do it all at once. I would argue that cars aren't on an upgrade path because you don't use pieces of your old one with your new one (usually). But with cameras, you can.

You can even keep EF-s lenses and full-frame at the same time. I'm actually about to do that. I'm going to sell my 17-40L (rarely used on full-frame because I like the fish better) and replace it with an 18-135STM because that's a better walk around on crop and a better video lens. If I need a rectilinear ultrawide, I'll use the fish on crop and defish or use it on full-frame and crop and defish.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 9, 2015 at 21:11 UTC
On Opinion: The myth of the upgrade path article (1409 comments in total)
In reply to:

Lee Jay: It's okay to be wrong Richard, and you are.

My first purchase was a 10D. That led me to a 20D for its many in-body improvements. My basic two lenses were a 17-40L and a 28-135IS but I also had two others, the 50/1.8 and 75-300IS. However, I loved wide-angle, and none of these count, and the 75-300IS wasn't long enough or fast enough. So I bought a Sigma 15mm fisheye for the crop cameras and traded up to the 50/1.4. The fish on crop is like a 19mm rectilinear on full-frame which is sort-of wide. Note than none of these are crop-lenses, but all are usable on a crop-only system.

I then sold my 10D and bought a 5D, and I sold my 28-135IS and bought a 24-105L. Then I had really, really wide (full-frame fisheye on full-frame), wide (17-40L on full-frame), and walkaround (17-40L on crop, 24-105 on full-frame). I got rid of the 50/1.4 for an 85/1.8, and sold the 75-300IS for a 70-200/2.8 + TCs, all through a nice, continuous path, each step leading to the next.

So, it's no myth.

My basic range isn't 17-105 now, it's 17-200 (17-40L, 24-105L, 70-200L). That's not far different from the original 27-216 (17-40L, 28-135IS) + 19mm. I used to have a 75-300IS, now I have a 70-200/2.8L IS II and 2x TC III. I used to have a 50/1.8 on crop, now I have an 85/1.8 on full-frame. I didn't mention this but I also used to have a 20/1.8 on crop, now I have a 35/1.4L.

It's all basically the same, just with better optics, faster equivalent speeds, better focusing performance, and of course the 1 1/3 stop geometrical advantage of full-frame when I use the full-frame camera. I still have, and still use the crop camera as well, and my plan for the next year or so is to buy a 7D Mark II as an upgrade to my 20D and either a 6D or 5DIII replacement as an upgrade to my 5D.

I used to shoot with the 17-40L on my 10D and the 28-135IS on my 20D. Now I shoot with the 24-105 on my 5D and the 70-200/2.8 on my 20D.

As I said, all of this has been pretty continuous.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 9, 2015 at 20:52 UTC
On Opinion: The myth of the upgrade path article (1409 comments in total)
In reply to:

Lee Jay: It's okay to be wrong Richard, and you are.

My first purchase was a 10D. That led me to a 20D for its many in-body improvements. My basic two lenses were a 17-40L and a 28-135IS but I also had two others, the 50/1.8 and 75-300IS. However, I loved wide-angle, and none of these count, and the 75-300IS wasn't long enough or fast enough. So I bought a Sigma 15mm fisheye for the crop cameras and traded up to the 50/1.4. The fish on crop is like a 19mm rectilinear on full-frame which is sort-of wide. Note than none of these are crop-lenses, but all are usable on a crop-only system.

I then sold my 10D and bought a 5D, and I sold my 28-135IS and bought a 24-105L. Then I had really, really wide (full-frame fisheye on full-frame), wide (17-40L on full-frame), and walkaround (17-40L on crop, 24-105 on full-frame). I got rid of the 50/1.4 for an 85/1.8, and sold the 75-300IS for a 70-200/2.8 + TCs, all through a nice, continuous path, each step leading to the next.

So, it's no myth.

Calling it a "myth" is a pretty strong statement that this process doesn't exist. But it does exist, and many including myself have followed this "mythical" process. And that means it isn't a myth. It exists both in concept and in practice.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 9, 2015 at 20:28 UTC
On Opinion: The myth of the upgrade path article (1409 comments in total)
In reply to:

Lee Jay: It's okay to be wrong Richard, and you are.

My first purchase was a 10D. That led me to a 20D for its many in-body improvements. My basic two lenses were a 17-40L and a 28-135IS but I also had two others, the 50/1.8 and 75-300IS. However, I loved wide-angle, and none of these count, and the 75-300IS wasn't long enough or fast enough. So I bought a Sigma 15mm fisheye for the crop cameras and traded up to the 50/1.4. The fish on crop is like a 19mm rectilinear on full-frame which is sort-of wide. Note than none of these are crop-lenses, but all are usable on a crop-only system.

I then sold my 10D and bought a 5D, and I sold my 28-135IS and bought a 24-105L. Then I had really, really wide (full-frame fisheye on full-frame), wide (17-40L on full-frame), and walkaround (17-40L on crop, 24-105 on full-frame). I got rid of the 50/1.4 for an 85/1.8, and sold the 75-300IS for a 70-200/2.8 + TCs, all through a nice, continuous path, each step leading to the next.

So, it's no myth.

No, every lens did the function for which I purchased it, I just smoothly upgraded the quality and expanded the range over time.

That process is often called an "upgrade path", which is a path I followed, from crop to full-frame, retaining my crop camera and all capabilities along the way.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 9, 2015 at 20:25 UTC
On Opinion: The myth of the upgrade path article (1409 comments in total)

It's okay to be wrong Richard, and you are.

My first purchase was a 10D. That led me to a 20D for its many in-body improvements. My basic two lenses were a 17-40L and a 28-135IS but I also had two others, the 50/1.8 and 75-300IS. However, I loved wide-angle, and none of these count, and the 75-300IS wasn't long enough or fast enough. So I bought a Sigma 15mm fisheye for the crop cameras and traded up to the 50/1.4. The fish on crop is like a 19mm rectilinear on full-frame which is sort-of wide. Note than none of these are crop-lenses, but all are usable on a crop-only system.

I then sold my 10D and bought a 5D, and I sold my 28-135IS and bought a 24-105L. Then I had really, really wide (full-frame fisheye on full-frame), wide (17-40L on full-frame), and walkaround (17-40L on crop, 24-105 on full-frame). I got rid of the 50/1.4 for an 85/1.8, and sold the 75-300IS for a 70-200/2.8 + TCs, all through a nice, continuous path, each step leading to the next.

So, it's no myth.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 9, 2015 at 19:56 UTC as 154th comment | 12 replies
In reply to:

RichRMA: What good are these things with such short transmission ranges?

500 meters? In practice, it's more like 4,000 meters but regardless do you know what this tiny thing would look like at 500m? A dot, if you're lucky.

In practice you're going to keep a little thing like this within about 200m.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 16, 2014 at 15:04 UTC
On Canon EOS 7D Mark II First Impressions Review preview (2702 comments in total)
In reply to:

Lee Jay: Let me talk for a moment about the lack of a touch screen.

I plan to shoot video, mostly handheld of high-speed subjects. In other words, I want to use it like a camcorder. That means I want an eye-level viewfinder, and that means, I'll be using a Hoodman or similar attached to the LCD.

I'm not sure the Hoodman would inadvertently trigger a touch screen, but it would most certainly render it useless. Given the way I intend to use it, it may well be better off with a fixed non-touch-screen LCD and a joystick.

Not a filmmaker, and phase detect AF during video is pretty greatly more important to me than anything Sony or Panasonic have to offer.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 26, 2014 at 23:42 UTC
On Enthusiast compact camera roundup (2014) article (185 comments in total)

Weird...my top two aren't even listed, and they're from Canon.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 26, 2014 at 04:07 UTC as 52nd comment | 1 reply
On Canon EOS 7D Mark II First Impressions Review preview (2702 comments in total)
In reply to:

Lee Jay: Let me talk for a moment about the lack of a touch screen.

I plan to shoot video, mostly handheld of high-speed subjects. In other words, I want to use it like a camcorder. That means I want an eye-level viewfinder, and that means, I'll be using a Hoodman or similar attached to the LCD.

I'm not sure the Hoodman would inadvertently trigger a touch screen, but it would most certainly render it useless. Given the way I intend to use it, it may well be better off with a fixed non-touch-screen LCD and a joystick.

That sounds reasonable until you realize the 70D doesn't have a joystick. If it's either a T/S LCD or a joystick, that's a tradeoff, not a slam dunk. If it's just a fixed touch screen and joystick, then turning off all touch input would have to be an option in the settings so that it didn't get messed up with the constant touch of an LCD loupe.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 21, 2014 at 22:08 UTC
On Canon EOS 7D Mark II First Impressions Review preview (2702 comments in total)

Let me talk for a moment about the lack of a touch screen.

I plan to shoot video, mostly handheld of high-speed subjects. In other words, I want to use it like a camcorder. That means I want an eye-level viewfinder, and that means, I'll be using a Hoodman or similar attached to the LCD.

I'm not sure the Hoodman would inadvertently trigger a touch screen, but it would most certainly render it useless. Given the way I intend to use it, it may well be better off with a fixed non-touch-screen LCD and a joystick.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 21, 2014 at 21:24 UTC as 52nd comment | 8 replies
In reply to:

DVT80111: About time Canon but I won't cancel my Tamron 150-600 order.

400mm is no quite long enough for birds.

Based on the MTF charts, the Canon looks to be sharper with a 1.4x than the Tamron is bare at 600mm.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 11, 2014 at 06:19 UTC
On Video: Capturing nature with the Canon EOS 7D Mark II article (196 comments in total)

Couple minor errors, but a good video and obviously a good bit of effort and time.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 11, 2014 at 01:49 UTC as 93rd comment | 1 reply
Total: 552, showing: 21 – 40
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