Lee Jay

Lee Jay

Lives in United States CO, United States
Works as a Electrical Engineer / Wind Energy Research
Joined on Oct 17, 2003

Comments

Total: 543, showing: 1 – 20
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On 2014 DPReview Readers' Best Shots: Things article (19 comments in total)

I like number 2 since I like airplanes. Number 10 is just disgusting.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 26, 2015 at 15:14 UTC as 8th comment
On 2014 DPReview Readers' Best Shots: Places article (13 comments in total)

I don't care much for "eye candy" but I like number 9 because it shows something happening.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 26, 2015 at 15:13 UTC as 7th comment
On Adobe details OS support for next version of Lightroom article (223 comments in total)
In reply to:

iAPX: I am awaiting for better performances for LR6 on OS X (actually using LR5 on OS X 10.10 Yosemite).
- using more than 4GB of RAM (checked on a 16GB and 24GB configurations that I use everyday)
- using hyper-threading, still it seems limited to number of PHYSICAL cores, thus not taking account the work Intel did to make hyperthreading really efficient (4-core w/hyperthreading vs 4/-core w/o)
- using multi-threading and overlapped IO to speed-up Exports (actually you have to launch many parallel Exports to try to feed the fast CPU you pay for!)
- using the GPUs for RAW decoding and processing, even if it's an opt-in option (openCL developer here!)
- working correctly on retina display, not hiding the "loading" label while it's displaying a non-retina image, and awaiting seconds to have the true retina display to be done. (iMac Retina)

LightRoom seems to be based mainly on old Photoshop CS4 or CS5 base-code that is mono-threaded, except for some filters.

The vast majority of LR users do use the cataloging functionality. Also, a great many LR users use it INSTEAD of PS and therefore don't need to own (or rent) PS.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 23, 2015 at 17:26 UTC
On Adobe details OS support for next version of Lightroom article (223 comments in total)
In reply to:

iAPX: I am awaiting for better performances for LR6 on OS X (actually using LR5 on OS X 10.10 Yosemite).
- using more than 4GB of RAM (checked on a 16GB and 24GB configurations that I use everyday)
- using hyper-threading, still it seems limited to number of PHYSICAL cores, thus not taking account the work Intel did to make hyperthreading really efficient (4-core w/hyperthreading vs 4/-core w/o)
- using multi-threading and overlapped IO to speed-up Exports (actually you have to launch many parallel Exports to try to feed the fast CPU you pay for!)
- using the GPUs for RAW decoding and processing, even if it's an opt-in option (openCL developer here!)
- working correctly on retina display, not hiding the "loading" label while it's displaying a non-retina image, and awaiting seconds to have the true retina display to be done. (iMac Retina)

LightRoom seems to be based mainly on old Photoshop CS4 or CS5 base-code that is mono-threaded, except for some filters.

Lightroom isn't based on PS code at all. It's largely written in a different language. Hyperthreading wouldn't help much.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 23, 2015 at 04:43 UTC
On Fujifilm announces new rugged and long zoom compacts article (28 comments in total)
In reply to:

thx1138: 1/2.33" sensors should be banned. Can't believe we still see this crap in abundance in 2015.

They're also useful for cameras that fit comfortably into your pocket. I really find 25mm to be about my limit and the 1/1.7" compacts are more like 29-32mm thick. The smaller sensor makes for shorter focal lengths and thus thinner cameras. And they still crush the best cell phone cameras.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 15, 2015 at 13:00 UTC
On Fujifilm announces new rugged and long zoom compacts article (28 comments in total)
In reply to:

Nick8: Greetings everybody,
Does anyone know why different manufacturers are using that type of protruding design for their underwater camera lenses? For me it looks very odd.

Because the lens zooms back, into the body. It's entirely inside the camera covered by a window on the outside.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 15, 2015 at 11:57 UTC
On Fujifilm announces new rugged and long zoom compacts article (28 comments in total)

How does a 28-140 fix itself at 18mm?

Direct link | Posted on Jan 15, 2015 at 09:41 UTC as 11th comment | 1 reply
On Fujifilm announces new rugged and long zoom compacts article (28 comments in total)
In reply to:

thx1138: 1/2.33" sensors should be banned. Can't believe we still see this crap in abundance in 2015.

Why? They're pretty useful.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 15, 2015 at 09:41 UTC
In reply to:

dash2k8: Outsell? I actually believe it. Mirrorless will be more appealing to the masses. Ma's and pa's looking for simple family photos will prefer the smaller, lighter and more portable options. And honestly, mirrorless is closing the performance gap to make it good enough for most consumers. Pros will never outnumber amateurs so I don't see why people don't think mirrorless will outsell DSLRs. I also don't understand why ppl are upset at this eventuality.

I think mirrorless is better for manual-focus situations, and that's about it.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 14, 2015 at 03:38 UTC
In reply to:

dash2k8: Outsell? I actually believe it. Mirrorless will be more appealing to the masses. Ma's and pa's looking for simple family photos will prefer the smaller, lighter and more portable options. And honestly, mirrorless is closing the performance gap to make it good enough for most consumers. Pros will never outnumber amateurs so I don't see why people don't think mirrorless will outsell DSLRs. I also don't understand why ppl are upset at this eventuality.

At least 14 years.

http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/1456578

Direct link | Posted on Jan 14, 2015 at 02:55 UTC
In reply to:

CameraLabTester: When consumers (not professionals) consider SIZE as a major factor: MIRRORLESS will kick in.

Oops! It already has!

PROS: big and bulky

CONSUMERS: small, comfortable, and wise. (smart too)

.

One of the most severe pains I've ever had in my life came after using a camera that was too small for my hands non-stop for about an hour and a half. I hadn't realized it while I was using it but my hand had cramped around the tiny grip. I had to pry my fingers open.

I've used properly sized SLRs for 12 hours straight without an issue.

Same thing as wearing shoes that are too small - they hurt.

It's not hard to understand - a camera grip is like a glove for your hand or a shoe for your foot. It should fit. Smaller is NOT better, it's worse unless you're only going to use it for a few seconds.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 14, 2015 at 02:35 UTC
In reply to:

dash2k8: Outsell? I actually believe it. Mirrorless will be more appealing to the masses. Ma's and pa's looking for simple family photos will prefer the smaller, lighter and more portable options. And honestly, mirrorless is closing the performance gap to make it good enough for most consumers. Pros will never outnumber amateurs so I don't see why people don't think mirrorless will outsell DSLRs. I also don't understand why ppl are upset at this eventuality.

And that would be their phone or a basic compact, both mirrorless.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 14, 2015 at 02:13 UTC
In reply to:

CameraLabTester: When consumers (not professionals) consider SIZE as a major factor: MIRRORLESS will kick in.

Oops! It already has!

PROS: big and bulky

CONSUMERS: small, comfortable, and wise. (smart too)

.

Camera's have to fit my hands, and my hands aren't getting any smaller, same as my feet. I need my camera's to fit my hands, same as my shoes fit my feet. Sorry that got past you.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 14, 2015 at 02:08 UTC
In reply to:

dash2k8: Outsell? I actually believe it. Mirrorless will be more appealing to the masses. Ma's and pa's looking for simple family photos will prefer the smaller, lighter and more portable options. And honestly, mirrorless is closing the performance gap to make it good enough for most consumers. Pros will never outnumber amateurs so I don't see why people don't think mirrorless will outsell DSLRs. I also don't understand why ppl are upset at this eventuality.

Mirrorless already outsell SLRs, and always has - compact film cameras, compact digital cameras, phones, they're all mirrorless and all primarily designed for people who don't care about their photos.

Don't care. SLRs are simply better, and I do care about my photos.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 14, 2015 at 02:07 UTC
In reply to:

CameraLabTester: When consumers (not professionals) consider SIZE as a major factor: MIRRORLESS will kick in.

Oops! It already has!

PROS: big and bulky

CONSUMERS: small, comfortable, and wise. (smart too)

.

When consumers get wise, everyone will start wearing children's shoes. They're lighter, smaller, and cheaper.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 14, 2015 at 01:49 UTC
On Opinion: The myth of the upgrade path article (1335 comments in total)
In reply to:

babart: Richard's viewpoint is right on the money. In my humble opinion the only reason to currently move into full frame is to use a 24 to 28mm shift (or tilt/shift) lens for achitecture, so as to have the advantage of the moderate wide angle lens. Even then, it helps to have a slew of film (full-frame) lenses :). I'm in both camps and I'm buying a used A7 and a PK to Sony E adapter.

Other than that I can't see myself outgrowing my Fuji equipment in the near future. I can load an X-E1 body mounted with a 27mm pancake, and two excellent zooms of 18-55 and 55-200 in a case that's about 10 x 6 x 4 inches and weighs a bit over 3.5 pounds (1.5kg.) The image quality is superb, and I suspect it's the same with any APS-C system with a 16 - 18 mpix sensor and some decent lenses.

I have a friend that has a full-frame Nikon with a battery grip and both of the Nikon f/2.8 zooms (24-70 and 70-200.) He wonders why he's so tired at the end of his vacations. :)

Cheers,
BAB

I've been carrying an SLR, several lenses, and accessories around on trips since 1979 when I was a little kid. No trouble yet but you do need to carry it in a safe way. I used to use a backpack but now I use a ThinkTank ChangeUp waist pack which shares the load between both hips and both shoulders all at once.

Frankly, I don't even feel it. I've walked 15 miles a day 9 days in a row like that.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 12, 2015 at 14:01 UTC
On Opinion: The myth of the upgrade path article (1335 comments in total)
In reply to:

Lee Jay: It's okay to be wrong Richard, and you are.

My first purchase was a 10D. That led me to a 20D for its many in-body improvements. My basic two lenses were a 17-40L and a 28-135IS but I also had two others, the 50/1.8 and 75-300IS. However, I loved wide-angle, and none of these count, and the 75-300IS wasn't long enough or fast enough. So I bought a Sigma 15mm fisheye for the crop cameras and traded up to the 50/1.4. The fish on crop is like a 19mm rectilinear on full-frame which is sort-of wide. Note than none of these are crop-lenses, but all are usable on a crop-only system.

I then sold my 10D and bought a 5D, and I sold my 28-135IS and bought a 24-105L. Then I had really, really wide (full-frame fisheye on full-frame), wide (17-40L on full-frame), and walkaround (17-40L on crop, 24-105 on full-frame). I got rid of the 50/1.4 for an 85/1.8, and sold the 75-300IS for a 70-200/2.8 + TCs, all through a nice, continuous path, each step leading to the next.

So, it's no myth.

"It's the 'I won't buy APS-C lenses' and 'I won't buy a system without a full frame option' logic that I was mainly arguing against."

Missed this one.

For anyone that's seriously interested in photography, I strongly recommend against any system without a full frame upgrade option. If you buy a, say, m43 system and a bunch of accessories and then decided you really want a bigger sensor, you're stuck not only selling your body and maybe upgrading a lens or two, but all the accessories as well. When I bought my 10D I got a 550EX. I didn't need to sell it when I moved to full-frame. I also got a TC-80N3 remote. Again, I could continue to use it. Same with the flash extension cable, batteries, battery chargers, more flashes, all the gels I cut for my flashes, software, etc.

That's HUGE advantage of buying a system with a larger sensor upgrade option. HUGE. And it's a big reason I think 4/3 is a dead-end system and don't ever recommend it.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 10, 2015 at 19:55 UTC
On Opinion: The myth of the upgrade path article (1335 comments in total)
In reply to:

babart: Richard's viewpoint is right on the money. In my humble opinion the only reason to currently move into full frame is to use a 24 to 28mm shift (or tilt/shift) lens for achitecture, so as to have the advantage of the moderate wide angle lens. Even then, it helps to have a slew of film (full-frame) lenses :). I'm in both camps and I'm buying a used A7 and a PK to Sony E adapter.

Other than that I can't see myself outgrowing my Fuji equipment in the near future. I can load an X-E1 body mounted with a 27mm pancake, and two excellent zooms of 18-55 and 55-200 in a case that's about 10 x 6 x 4 inches and weighs a bit over 3.5 pounds (1.5kg.) The image quality is superb, and I suspect it's the same with any APS-C system with a 16 - 18 mpix sensor and some decent lenses.

I have a friend that has a full-frame Nikon with a battery grip and both of the Nikon f/2.8 zooms (24-70 and 70-200.) He wonders why he's so tired at the end of his vacations. :)

Cheers,
BAB

And I'm 5'6" and 150 and don't have a problem.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 10, 2015 at 03:33 UTC
On Opinion: The myth of the upgrade path article (1335 comments in total)
In reply to:

babart: Richard's viewpoint is right on the money. In my humble opinion the only reason to currently move into full frame is to use a 24 to 28mm shift (or tilt/shift) lens for achitecture, so as to have the advantage of the moderate wide angle lens. Even then, it helps to have a slew of film (full-frame) lenses :). I'm in both camps and I'm buying a used A7 and a PK to Sony E adapter.

Other than that I can't see myself outgrowing my Fuji equipment in the near future. I can load an X-E1 body mounted with a 27mm pancake, and two excellent zooms of 18-55 and 55-200 in a case that's about 10 x 6 x 4 inches and weighs a bit over 3.5 pounds (1.5kg.) The image quality is superb, and I suspect it's the same with any APS-C system with a 16 - 18 mpix sensor and some decent lenses.

I have a friend that has a full-frame Nikon with a battery grip and both of the Nikon f/2.8 zooms (24-70 and 70-200.) He wonders why he's so tired at the end of his vacations. :)

Cheers,
BAB

One moves to full-frame for the same reason one moves from an f/4.5 lens to a better f/2.8 lens, and it's the same gap.

If you don't need that, fine. But if you do...a stop is a stop, and full-frame is a little more than a stop.

And your friend needs to get in shape. Here's my vacation kit:

5D
24-105/4L IS
70-200/2.8L IS
35/1.4L
Sigma 15mm fisheye
2x teleconverter
Small flash
Four extra batteries
Seven extra cards
Mini tripod
Cleaning supplies
Remote release

No problem carrying that all day every day.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 10, 2015 at 00:52 UTC
On Opinion: The myth of the upgrade path article (1335 comments in total)
In reply to:

Lee Jay: It's okay to be wrong Richard, and you are.

My first purchase was a 10D. That led me to a 20D for its many in-body improvements. My basic two lenses were a 17-40L and a 28-135IS but I also had two others, the 50/1.8 and 75-300IS. However, I loved wide-angle, and none of these count, and the 75-300IS wasn't long enough or fast enough. So I bought a Sigma 15mm fisheye for the crop cameras and traded up to the 50/1.4. The fish on crop is like a 19mm rectilinear on full-frame which is sort-of wide. Note than none of these are crop-lenses, but all are usable on a crop-only system.

I then sold my 10D and bought a 5D, and I sold my 28-135IS and bought a 24-105L. Then I had really, really wide (full-frame fisheye on full-frame), wide (17-40L on full-frame), and walkaround (17-40L on crop, 24-105 on full-frame). I got rid of the 50/1.4 for an 85/1.8, and sold the 75-300IS for a 70-200/2.8 + TCs, all through a nice, continuous path, each step leading to the next.

So, it's no myth.

Well, that's the exact logic I followed. Notice that not one of the lenses I bought was EF-s.

Further, even if you do buy EF-s lenses, what's the big deal about selling them as you migrate to full-frame? The only thing that would make this something other than an "upgrade path" is if you are forced to do it all at once. I would argue that cars aren't on an upgrade path because you don't use pieces of your old one with your new one (usually). But with cameras, you can.

You can even keep EF-s lenses and full-frame at the same time. I'm actually about to do that. I'm going to sell my 17-40L (rarely used on full-frame because I like the fish better) and replace it with an 18-135STM because that's a better walk around on crop and a better video lens. If I need a rectilinear ultrawide, I'll use the fish on crop and defish or use it on full-frame and crop and defish.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 9, 2015 at 21:11 UTC
Total: 543, showing: 1 – 20
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