Maxfield_photo

Maxfield_photo

Lives in United States Cincinnati, OH, United States
Works as a Musician
Joined on Apr 26, 2011

Comments

Total: 87, showing: 21 – 40
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On Review in progress: Pentax K-5 II and K-5 II S article (42 comments in total)
In reply to:

Münchhausen: @ dpreview:
Thanks a lot for this samples; I would like to see a report on the behaviour of the FA-Limiteds (like the 43 you used on the K-5II) on both K-5II and K-5IIs. My expierence, and you can read a detailed description at Klaus´photozone.de, is that the 43Lim isn´t very sharp from edge to edge on the original K-5 (very mushy corners at 2.8, no corners at all at 1.9, but excellent center sharpness), contrary to the K-7 and older models. One idea was that this was the fault of the more than fairly strong AA-filter on the K-5; but the samples with the 43Lim on the K-5II you posted seem better to me, even very acceptable or good at 2.8. If the K-5II has a weaker AA-filter than the K-5, than the FA-Limiteds should really shine on the K-5IIs...
Would be nice to read your opinion!
Best regards
M.

I don't own the lens myself, but I noticed a big discrepancy in sharpness between the two reviews on Photozone.de of the FA43 on the K10 vs. the K5. It could be that the pixels of the Samsung CCD (I think) used in the K10 are more forgiving of non-telecentric lens designs than the Sony sensor used in the K5. Or, more likely, Klaus just got a bad copy of the lens for his second review. Still, it is strange.

Of course the FA Limiteds were optimized for real-world scenes, not test charts, a certain amount of field curvature was intentionally left uncorrected. There is a very interesting paper written by the lens's designer, Hirakawa Jun, discussing the design philosophy behind the FA Limiteds. Particular importance was given to the transition from in-focus to out-of-focus regions. In my opinion that's what makes these lenses so special, and of course their size.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 23, 2013 at 17:41 UTC

Uhhh so... just put the stolen lens on an older body?

Direct link | Posted on Apr 15, 2013 at 22:37 UTC as 57th comment | 1 reply

Want!

Direct link | Posted on Mar 14, 2013 at 03:54 UTC as 28th comment
In reply to:

Rick Knepper: PENTAX Announces Rebates on the Highly Acclaimed 645D System as well as on select Limited Lenses when purchased with its Flagship DSLR, the K-5 IIs

Unless I am reading this wrong, this statement does not seem to jive with the actual rebate verbiage on the website. These two cameras serve very different markets and seems illogical to tie the purchase of one to the other.

Methinks someone forgot to proofread the title. Actually buying the K5IIs gets you a rebate on the K-mount FA Limiteds when purchased at the same time. Buying the 645D gets you a rebate on the 645-mount DA 25mm or DFA 90mm macro, and a free 645 DA 55mm.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 12, 2013 at 01:40 UTC
In reply to:

Maxfield_photo: I own the Sekonic 758DR and the color checker passport, and they are both worth their weight in gold. I got to play with the 478 at a camera show, and it seems pretty cool, but I'm not used to touch screens, sort of a doubly steep learning curve for me. Gotta say though it would be really nice to have the manual light controls remotely right there in the meter.

If you find yourself wondering, "Do I really need a light meter?", well honestly, no, unless you work in a high volume production studio and need to meter ratios quickly and precisely 'need' is too strong a word. Will a light meter and a color checker improve your photography? Yes, immensely.

I agree with you completely, everyone can benefit from owning a good light meter, but I read so many posts asking "Do I really need to buy a light meter?", I think it's hard for some digital shooters to understand how mind-blowingly useful it is. They don't think of it in the same terms as a sharp, fast lens, it's just not as sexy to them. Ironically the light meter will probably do as much if not more to improve the quality of their photography though.

But "need"? No, one can chimp and fiddle one's way to a good photograph these days using the LCD on the camera, and then fiddle and chimp their way though the next shoot and the next. It's not like the days of shooting E-6 film (actually I still do that), where missing the exposure by a stop meant you just cost the bride memories of the happiest day of her life.

I'll put it this way, if I had to sell off my gear a piece at a time to make ends meet, the last thing to go would be my camera and lens, next to last would be my light meter.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 9, 2013 at 01:26 UTC

I own the Sekonic 758DR and the color checker passport, and they are both worth their weight in gold. I got to play with the 478 at a camera show, and it seems pretty cool, but I'm not used to touch screens, sort of a doubly steep learning curve for me. Gotta say though it would be really nice to have the manual light controls remotely right there in the meter.

If you find yourself wondering, "Do I really need a light meter?", well honestly, no, unless you work in a high volume production studio and need to meter ratios quickly and precisely 'need' is too strong a word. Will a light meter and a color checker improve your photography? Yes, immensely.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 8, 2013 at 15:55 UTC as 6th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

Jeff Peterman: Amazing how our expectations have changed. To me, these are grainy and over saturated compared to modern digital images!

Our expectations have indeed changed, though perhaps not for the better. I suppose you would have pounded that grain into submission with the noise reduction slider, turned down the saturation slider till the red blinkies went away, added a tone curve to get rid of some of that annoying contrast, and sharpened it up with some unsharp mask?

The beauty of film is that each one has it's own characteristics and quirks. Photographers call it the "look" of a film. Some are grainy, some are contrasty, some are colorful, and you choose the right look to match your artistic vision the way a sculptor would choose a block of marble to carve his masterpiece. And like a sculpture where the imperfections in color and texture in the rock contribute to the overall aesthetic of the work, so to does film grain add to the feel of an image.

I guess that's lost on some photographers these days.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 13, 2013 at 07:28 UTC

Every time I have problems with color from a roll of film these days, I can't help but think "If only I had loaded Kodachrome" Probably just selective memory, but what a great film it was, we shall never see it's equal again in this world.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 12, 2013 at 19:11 UTC as 6th comment
On Pentax launches WG-3 and WG-3 GPS waterproof cameras article (66 comments in total)

Ok camera manufacturers, listen up, first one to make a waterproof camera that shoots in RAW gets my money, but not a penny till then.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 30, 2013 at 01:33 UTC as 22nd comment

Can I please have my full frame now? I've been patient...

Direct link | Posted on Jan 29, 2013 at 01:53 UTC as 46th comment | 1 reply
On Fujifilm X100S Digital Split Image focus - how it works article (101 comments in total)

This camera just became more appealing

Direct link | Posted on Jan 11, 2013 at 05:23 UTC as 18th comment
On Pentax MX-1 Preview preview (214 comments in total)
In reply to:

Maxfield_photo: Although this camera isn't for me, I like the brass, and I hope to see that as an option on future Pentax offerings.

But FFS, what is with the goofy sensor measurements? What is 1/1.7 of an inch? Who thinks in those terms? Why not say .58 inches, or better yet 15mm.

I'm just saying, if they want a decimal they should have a decimal, if they want a fraction they should have a fraction, but decimals within fractions really grind my gears :P 9/16th would be reasonably close, and it's easy to visualize, just over half.

But I still maintain that millimeters would be the best way to measure it since lenses are measured in mm. And it gives you a point of reference, 15mm would be the sensor diagonal of this camera, hence a zoom setting of 15mm would equate to a "normal" lens, or 43mm in 35mm terms. From there we can work out the crop factor, 43 ÷ 15 = 2.9X

I agree the only reason to use such confusing notation is to obfuscate the diminutive size of the sensor.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 7, 2013 at 18:43 UTC
On Pentax MX-1 Preview preview (214 comments in total)

Although this camera isn't for me, I like the brass, and I hope to see that as an option on future Pentax offerings.

But FFS, what is with the goofy sensor measurements? What is 1/1.7 of an inch? Who thinks in those terms? Why not say .58 inches, or better yet 15mm.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 7, 2013 at 17:44 UTC as 67th comment | 6 replies
On Just Posted: Pentax K-30 full review article (272 comments in total)
In reply to:

peevee1: "The 'Hyper' in Hyper Program and Hyper Manual refers to the function of the green dial"

What green dial?

I think they mean the green button. Pressing the green button on a Pentax camera sets the exposure settings, Aperture/Shutter/ISO, to the program line recommended settings for a given amount of light. You can specify whether you want to prioritize speed, depth of field, or sharpness, or default which is a combination of all three (it changes to keep you away from extremes like a 1/8th exposure with a 200mm lens). It will also automatically do a stop-down reading from a manual lens.

So in Manual mode, if you have depth of field priority set, and you press the green button the camera will change the shutter speed (and ISO if you allow it to do so) to what it thinks will yield a proper exposure, and then apply any EV comp you have set.

I never shoot in any other mode, so I couldn't tell you how it works in Av, Tv, Sv or TAv, but i think it will always take a stop-down reading if the camera can't detect to which aperture you have the lens set.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 31, 2012 at 16:11 UTC
On Just Posted: Pentax K-30 full review article (272 comments in total)
In reply to:

topstuff: I think this is harsh on Pentax. They've worked hard on a well priced budget DSLR that even by DPR's own admission is pretty hard to fault for stills shooters.

It deserves Gold on this basis alone.

No dedicated video button means no dedicated video button to accidentally press :)

Direct link | Posted on Oct 31, 2012 at 01:59 UTC
On Just Posted: Pentax K-30 full review article (272 comments in total)
In reply to:

ZAnton: pentax makes great cameras, they need to make good lenses. At the moment they have only a few. Second, I would still make optical IS on some lenses, as it is way better than in-body IS.

I think lens-based stabilization may have an advantage with long glass, but the advantage is marginal to non-existent with shorter glass and longer exposures. And of course the advantage of body based stabilization is you can have it on any lens. There have been some tests done with Sigma OS lenses vs. the in-body SR system that showed little to no advantage. That being said, I wouldn't mind the option of choosing.

Pentax did just announce their first stabilized lens though, the 645 90mm 2.8 Macro. Of course the 645D doesn't have in-body stabilization, but it will be interesting to see if the technology trickles down into their K mount lenses.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 30, 2012 at 22:04 UTC
On Photokina 2012: Interview - Sun Hong Lim of Samsung article (100 comments in total)

While I agree that the market is headed that way, I don't need for my camera to be able to share pictures with my friends and family, listen to iTunes, make a phone call, or play Angry Birds; I need it to take the pictures that I tell it to take. The notion that 'you can't go back' to a normal camera is hogwash, I've just re-transitioned to film and I'm enjoying every minute of it. Cameras don't have to be these soulless technocratic monstrosities. Honestly I like Leica's philosophy of simplicity, just not their price tag.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 20, 2012 at 09:46 UTC as 40th comment
On Photokina 2012: Pentax Ricoh Stand Report article (42 comments in total)
In reply to:

Sweets: .... left out the ... K3-FF ... :-)

No, Pentax did.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 18, 2012 at 17:21 UTC
In reply to:

ptox: I want it in red! (I refuse to make compromises!)

OMG, wait: can't I get this with the sapphire LCD cover of the previous generation? Uh, dealbreaker.

The Pentax 645D Grand Prix edition is for you then :P

Direct link | Posted on Sep 18, 2012 at 00:21 UTC
In reply to:

BrightEyesOnFire: $4500 for a slow medium prime...LOL okay maybe like five people will buy it.

Know of any other macro lenses faster than 2.8? Besides, you don't shoot macros at 2.8 unless if you're using them for portraiture, in which case 2.8 is razor thin on medium format.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 13, 2012 at 22:00 UTC
Total: 87, showing: 21 – 40
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