SiliconVoid

SiliconVoid

Lives in United States AK, United States
Joined on Mar 9, 2011

Comments

Total: 100, showing: 21 – 40
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On article Nikon D610 Review (389 comments in total)
In reply to:

StevenE: This is the third highest score ever given by DPR. The two higher scores were given to the Canon 1D mk IV and the Nikon D3S.

The D610 score beats Nikon's D800 and D800E, and the Canon 5DIII.

Really?

While everyone may not agree with DPR's categorization of different bodies - the D600, D610, Df, 6D, and A7 are not in the same category as the D800/e, 5DmkIII, nor 1DmkIV, D3s, etc and the scoring is 'within its category'.
So it does not score an 87 against the 82 of the D800, it scores an 87 against the 80, 81, 83, and 87 of the five cameras in its category...
Consider each category having its own 1-100 grading scale, and not related to other categories.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 14, 2014 at 15:41 UTC
On article Fujifilm X-T1 real-world samples gallery (185 comments in total)

I was not aware DPR, or the photographic community in general, had begun evaluating camera equipment on the basis of whether the user, or subjective audience, is instantly elevated to being a better photographer simply by holding/using or viewing images taken with said equipment... O.o
An image does not need to awe its audience in subject, composition, or creative lighting in order to represent a technical example of what the equipment is capable of providing. These are 'real-world' shots after all, that means just like the bulk of your 'real-world' shots sitting on 'your' computer there are any number of images that would not impress anyone photographically..
Just as one can strip a nut with a $75 wrench, someone else can get the job done with a $5 pair of pliers - the tool is being evaluated here, not the wielder... Enough already.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 4, 2014 at 21:36 UTC as 12th comment | 10 replies
On photo DSCF0218 in dpreview review samples's photo gallery (5 comments in total)
In reply to:

Gottschalk: I'm confused. I keep reading about the stunning high ISO of the Fuji's but I just don't see it. The pic above at ISO 800 and her hair is totally smeared from NR. I keep comparing iso 3200 pics to my E-M5 and I really don't see less noise...

Stop trolling..
The shot was at f2 and her shirt across the front of the shoulders is the plane of focus.. Holding the umbrella the way she is brings her shoulders just ahead of her eyes, and hair - nothing more than a slightly missed focus.
Try comparing your m5 to the airplane at 6400 on page three [0350] if you want to see how poorly your m5 compares to one of the best..

Direct link | Posted on Feb 4, 2014 at 12:37 UTC
On a photo in the Fujifilm X-T1 Sample Images sample gallery (5 comments in total)
In reply to:

Gottschalk: I'm confused. I keep reading about the stunning high ISO of the Fuji's but I just don't see it. The pic above at ISO 800 and her hair is totally smeared from NR. I keep comparing iso 3200 pics to my E-M5 and I really don't see less noise...

Stop trolling..
The shot was at f2 and her shirt across the front of the shoulders is the plane of focus.. Holding the umbrella the way she is brings her shoulders just ahead of her eyes, and hair - nothing more than a slightly missed focus.
Try comparing your m5 to the airplane at 6400 on page three [0350] if you want to see how poorly your m5 compares to one of the best..

Direct link | Posted on Feb 4, 2014 at 12:37 UTC
On a photo in the Fujifilm X-T1 Sample Images sample gallery (2 comments in total)
In reply to:

jtan163: What's going on with that blue wall? The top edge is very fuzzy or aliased?
I don't think it is focus per se, because the bottle and the bottom edge of the blue are similarly sharp, but the top blue edge is ....eeek!
Is my spacial perception failing me or is there something odd here?

Focal plane.. the top of the blue wall and the closest portion of the cement at the bottom are oof being much closer to the camera than the bottles, which were the focal point.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 4, 2014 at 12:17 UTC
On photo DSCF0265 in dpreview review samples's photo gallery (2 comments in total)
In reply to:

jtan163: What's going on with that blue wall? The top edge is very fuzzy or aliased?
I don't think it is focus per se, because the bottle and the bottom edge of the blue are similarly sharp, but the top blue edge is ....eeek!
Is my spacial perception failing me or is there something odd here?

Focal plane.. the top of the blue wall and the closest portion of the cement at the bottom are oof being much closer to the camera than the bottles, which were the focal point.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 4, 2014 at 12:17 UTC
On photo DSCF0249 in dpreview review samples's photo gallery (2 comments in total)
In reply to:

Ed/Chicago: On that singer sewing machine, what does that 3014 stand for? Is that a model number?

It is 301A, and it is the model number... circa e1950s.. the A designates it was manufactured in their Anderson, NC factory.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 4, 2014 at 12:12 UTC
On a photo in the Fujifilm X-T1 Sample Images sample gallery (2 comments in total)
In reply to:

Ed/Chicago: On that singer sewing machine, what does that 3014 stand for? Is that a model number?

It is 301A, and it is the model number... circa e1950s.. the A designates it was manufactured in their Anderson, NC factory.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 4, 2014 at 12:12 UTC
On article Sony Alpha 7 Review (1593 comments in total)
In reply to:

Retzius: I can't believe this is actually listed as a negative:

"Tools for shooting with third party lenses need improvement"

OK, lets be fair. Next time you post a Nikon review, I want to see "Tools for shooting with Canon lenses needs implementation" as a negative point.

Docking Sony for not giving you a full featured tool set for shooting with non-Sony lenses is just ludicrous and down-right biased. I don't see Nikon and Canon going out of their way to implement 3rd party hardware. To the contrary, Nikon releases firmware updates to hinder it!

Also 'being fair' we have to acknowledge the two things none of the mirrorless bodies are able/willing to provide in this configuration. The first is a design limitation - a MIRROR and optical viewfinder..... and the second is more of a financial issue, and that is electronic support for other manufacturers electronic lenses.. So while Sony may not be currently offering leading support 3rd party lenses, the reality is that no manufacturer will probably ever be able to, or willing to, offer the support needed.. =/

Direct link | Posted on Jan 23, 2014 at 08:11 UTC
On article Sony Alpha 7 Review (1593 comments in total)
In reply to:

Retzius: I can't believe this is actually listed as a negative:

"Tools for shooting with third party lenses need improvement"

OK, lets be fair. Next time you post a Nikon review, I want to see "Tools for shooting with Canon lenses needs implementation" as a negative point.

Docking Sony for not giving you a full featured tool set for shooting with non-Sony lenses is just ludicrous and down-right biased. I don't see Nikon and Canon going out of their way to implement 3rd party hardware. To the contrary, Nikon releases firmware updates to hinder it!

As long as we are 'being fair' one of the primary applications of a mirrorless interchangeable lens camera would be the ability to use 3rd party lenses due to no limitation of lens to sensor distance.. It is a completely valid point to weight in its evaluation, especially when you consider that other mirrorless manufacturers 'do' provide adaptation specifically for 3rd party lenses..
Why it is a negative in the case of Sony is because Sony thinks itself big enough that they don't 'need' 3rd party lens use, they are sorely mistaken.. This would however be the exact same thinking we would see from Nikon and Canon - but those two companies actually could validate that logic, Sony cannot.
Therefore "Tools for shooting with third party lenses need improvement" is a factor that many purchasers 'will' be considering...

Direct link | Posted on Jan 23, 2014 at 07:47 UTC
On article Fujifilm X-A1 real-world and test scene samples (105 comments in total)
In reply to:

jenbenn: Hm if a look at the green felt in the test scene the disadvantages of the x-trans sensor in the x-m1 and x-e2 compared to the x-a1 becomes very obvious. Both JPGS and RAWs of the x-e2 and the x-m1 are much softer compared to the corresponding files from the x-a1. So far I thought that the x-trans softness was a raw converter problem. From the test scene it appears however that even Fuji hasn't found a proper way to process the x-trans data for their in-camera jpgs!

Fuji as much as I love your cameras, please, drop that stupid xtrans colour filter array.In reality images created from bayer sensors (which include an anti alising filter) are much sharper. The noise advantage often attributed to x-trans is not real as it comes at the expense of softer files. Sorry but the same can be achieved with a proper raw converter and some noise reduction.

You know not what you speak of..
Your looking at the difference in raw converter (w/ raw files) and base jpg settings (w/ ooc jpgs) NOT the difference in sensors. The X-Trans sensors have better iso performance and detail resolve than comparable bayer array sensors, period.
Will that be the case forever, probably not, but is the reality atm. One would hope that manufacturers will get back to designing sensors with more concern in ISO performance rather than super high mp that you have to throw away (downsampling) but it is likely that it won't happen until some proverbial threshold is reached in mp..

You won't find it on DPR but you can find plenty of other sources that process X-Trans raw files with different apps than Adobe that show more of what the sensors can do.. Just because Adobe products are the most used doesn't mean they are the best to use - if you have trouble grasping that simple concept you probably should not be publicly voicing your criticisms of the products.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 8, 2014 at 10:50 UTC
On article Focus Stacking in Macro Photography (129 comments in total)
In reply to:

wkay: I'd really like to know how you get your bugs to sit still for 10 minutes while you setup the tripod in their faces, compose, and take 11 shots..

heh.. you can also use the machine gun method, especially if you plan to do a little bit of cropping in the final image. In that you simply take a series of shots at your cameras top fps rate while you slowly turn the focus ring, lol.
Not the best method for absolute critical sharpness, especially if your camera body vibrates too much, but in stacking you have lots of room to make small adjustments.
(Need to be on a tripod of course.)

Direct link | Posted on Apr 14, 2013 at 09:55 UTC
On article Focus Stacking in Macro Photography (129 comments in total)
In reply to:

Timmbits: " it’s better to change the focal point by moving the lens physically back and forth rather than using the focus ring"

I am curious as to how to do this...

I'm imagining my camera on a tripod, and I have to move it by a fraction of a millimeter... how does that work?

Didn't want to leave you with the wrong impression, or have you think that rails are the only/best way.
-Ideally- you would look for a macro lens that does not 'focus breath' (change its magnification) though many lenses people use do. The author mentions the Canon MP-E 65 which is a fantastic lens though big heavy and expensive. One of its benefits though is that it does not change its magnification through short adjustments unless you wrack the focus from min to max, and even then it isn't much. That allows you to simply bump the focus ring a little, capture an image, bump it a little further, capture another image etc. That will result in a series of images that are the same magnification (distance) on the sensor - only differing in what is in focus from front to back of the subject.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 14, 2013 at 09:48 UTC
On article Focus Stacking in Macro Photography (129 comments in total)
In reply to:

Timmbits: " it’s better to change the focal point by moving the lens physically back and forth rather than using the focus ring"

I am curious as to how to do this...

I'm imagining my camera on a tripod, and I have to move it by a fraction of a millimeter... how does that work?

Timmbits,
There are numerous styles of rails that will mount to your tripod, to which your camera mounts to the rails, allowing you to slide your camera forward/back in small increments (typically marked in millimeters.)
That would allow you to keep the same focal length of the lens while moving the focal plane forward or back for each image needed.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 14, 2013 at 07:21 UTC
On article Focus Stacking in Macro Photography (129 comments in total)
In reply to:

MP Burke: I think that the interest in photographing animals in the field is the ability to capture behaviour, such as fighting, feeding and mating.
Going out when the insect is at its coldest and immobile prevents such behaviour being observed.
The dragonfly in the photograph is not identified and indeed could be difficult to identify, since the view does not show the top of the abdomen or thorax where many characteristic markings are likely to be. Some may regard the image as novel or attractive, but it says little about what the insect is and nothing about what it does, so I do not regard it as being particularly useful nature photography.
It should be said that if people become fixated on stacking and want a static subject there are many pinned specimens already in museum collections. Some invertebrates are in decline: no need to kill them.
Finally many small animals have been photographed using the scanning electron microscope, with higher DOF and resolution than optical can provide.

Forget the article, there are many aspects of photography in general you do not appear to fully understand.
If I were to put it in the same 'black and white' context you have shared, there would be two types of photographers:
1 - Those that use photography as a tool for creative expression and/or interpretation.
2 - Others similar to yourself primarily interested in 'cataloging' everything around them through photography.

There is no right/wrong either way - just a different usage.

In contrast to your assertion however, I would dare say that most viewers and photographers looking at the dragonfly image noticed the symmetry, colors, fragile nature of its wings, etc and were not concerned what specific variety of its species it belongs to. It is simply a moment frozen in time that we are able to capture, study, enjoy, and at times even compose the perspective to produce imagery that is interesting/pleasing to look at.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 14, 2013 at 07:13 UTC
In reply to:

SiliconVoid: Little value in these news updates until ACR produces higher levels of detail than is already achievable in the jpg files. We know there is more detail there than ACR can process or the jpg files would not already be beyond what many other cameras deliver with their raw files.
How about showing what Fuji's raw converter does - its not like 'everyone' uses ACR to process their raw files, regardless of whether they use LR to process their output. How about DxO, CaptureOne, and several others that process Fuji files better than ACR. Though that would show the level of superiority the X-Trans sensor has over the 'end-of-life' Bayer designs, and we wouldn't want to do that to Sony and Toshiba now would we... =)

I understand the popularity of ACR/LR, and therefore the underlying interest, though as it cannot process any higher levels of detail than Fuji's own jpg engine it is still of little relevance until it does..
DPReview has mentioned numerous times though no attempts are made to tweak processing, choosing instead to maintain a level of uniformity in processing so there is some relevance to other sensors. I have tweaked ACR output of the X-Pro1 that surpasses results shown by DPReview. Unless DPReview is going to do the same it lessens the relevance of comparison given that the X-Trans is completely different.
Not trying to be combative btw, I am aware of the time needed to find the best tweak for each sensor versus an established 'average' setting. I am just stating an observation that 'updating' results that still show false softness and overall lack of image detail is doing little but degrading interest in what represents one of the few real evolutionary technologies in this industry.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 5, 2013 at 23:57 UTC
In reply to:

ManuelVilardeMacedo: Beautiful camera but raws are way too soft compared to the other cameras. What's the excuse this time? Not depth of field again, I expect...

-Undisclosed Fujifilm processing engine...

Not sure why Fuji feels the need to keep it a secret when they can see it is negatively impacting the perception of the sensor.. O.o

Direct link | Posted on Apr 5, 2013 at 22:42 UTC

Little value in these news updates until ACR produces higher levels of detail than is already achievable in the jpg files. We know there is more detail there than ACR can process or the jpg files would not already be beyond what many other cameras deliver with their raw files.
How about showing what Fuji's raw converter does - its not like 'everyone' uses ACR to process their raw files, regardless of whether they use LR to process their output. How about DxO, CaptureOne, and several others that process Fuji files better than ACR. Though that would show the level of superiority the X-Trans sensor has over the 'end-of-life' Bayer designs, and we wouldn't want to do that to Sony and Toshiba now would we... =)

Direct link | Posted on Apr 5, 2013 at 22:39 UTC as 16th comment | 9 replies

I try to keep up with this kind of stuff, not sure how this announcement got past me.. BUT in having recently visited the Hasselblad website, the new Lunar is nothing more than an NEX-6/7 with fancy trim... Damn!!, I was hoping for a cropped MF sensor, lol, which would have been a 35mm sensor - /sigh..

Oh well.... Who will be first with a 'real' interchangeable lens mirrorless body????
****A 35mm digital body!****

Direct link | Posted on Mar 28, 2013 at 03:59 UTC as 6th comment
On article Just posted: Fujifilm X-E1 Review (525 comments in total)
In reply to:

chillgreg: So lets see: vs Sony NEX 5R/6

The NEX's are

- much, much less expensive
- same (similar) IQ
- significantly smaller & lighter (+pancake kit zoom & 16/20 f2.8 WA)
- adapters take almost any legacy lens
- better articulating LCD
- proper sweep panorama
- 10fps burst inc RAW
- extensive video controls
- wifi + apps (eg intervalometer, remote control via mobile devices & multishot noise reduction etc)
- touchscreen or similar spec EVF
- faster AF + PD AF
- focus peaking

One must REALLY like Fuji or retro styling to throw as much as twice the money at a bigger, heavier arguably less capable mirrorless camera. The price Fuji's asking buys a LOT of DSLR.

Food for thought.

PS DPR can you please review the Sony NEX 5R/6 and also add the 5R to the image comparison database.

;=)
Lets see: Fujifilm X-Trans vs NEX gadgetry

- Less capable NEX bodies cheaper.
- IQ not comparable, sorry.
- Size subjective, if it matters more than IQ go for it.
- Same lens adapters available. Only limited by product release dates.
- Great how easily NEX LCD is damaged.
- Sweep panorama a required feature? - Can lock exposure to correct.
- FPS.. Learn subject, learn environment, anticipate shutter - learn photography.
- Takes video. Thankfully Fujifilm still a photography company.
- WiFi indeed welcome - not extensively useful in the field.
- X-Trans IQ at such a high level multi-shot NR apps not needed.
- Touch screen not needed on camera providing external control.
- Same excellent 2.36mp OLED EVF. (if EVF is your thing)
- Comparable hybrid AF performance - <OMD, <SLR.
- Unique, unmatched 3rd party lens support. (Leica M-Mount Adapter)

An excellent digital photography tool where absolute IQ and lenses are desired. Current RAW support offset by better JPG than many others RAW.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 1, 2013 at 07:59 UTC
Total: 100, showing: 21 – 40
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