57even

Lives in United Kingdom London, United Kingdom
Joined on Jul 16, 2012

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Total: 486, showing: 41 – 60
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On article Primer: Why would I buy a mirrorless camera? (563 comments in total)
In reply to:

57even: Here is an interesting thought.

If they had invented mirrorless cameras first, would anyone be bothering to patent a camera with a mechanical mirror, a bunch of prisms, a secondary mirror, and a separate AF sensor...?

While it's true that mirrorless can't quite match SOME of the best DSLRs for sports shooting, yet, DSLRs are more or less at a standstill in terms of development. They are already extremely refined to the point of being about as good as they can possibly be for their respective price bracket.

Mirrorless is barely out of nappies as a digital format. It has a lot of development potential and is moving as fast as EVF and sensor AF technology can forge ahead. Be interesting to be here in another 5 years and see what this guide says then... ;-)

Interesting. Matrix meters only maintain focus lock on the subject, something they have been doing for quite a while so its hardly an innovation. However, MILCs have a lot more AF sensors across more of the frame and do this rather better on the whole.

As for low light sensitivity and predictive AF, they have already matched a D7000 for speed. On the other hand, the D7000 had more complaints about AF accuracy that any other I can remember. Until the D800 possibly. Or the Canon 5Dmk2. Or...

Link | Posted on Dec 10, 2015 at 08:59 UTC
On article Primer: Why would I buy a mirrorless camera? (563 comments in total)
In reply to:

57even: Here is an interesting thought.

If they had invented mirrorless cameras first, would anyone be bothering to patent a camera with a mechanical mirror, a bunch of prisms, a secondary mirror, and a separate AF sensor...?

While it's true that mirrorless can't quite match SOME of the best DSLRs for sports shooting, yet, DSLRs are more or less at a standstill in terms of development. They are already extremely refined to the point of being about as good as they can possibly be for their respective price bracket.

Mirrorless is barely out of nappies as a digital format. It has a lot of development potential and is moving as fast as EVF and sensor AF technology can forge ahead. Be interesting to be here in another 5 years and see what this guide says then... ;-)

And they all assume their cheap plastic Rebel will focus like a 1Ds.

Link | Posted on Dec 10, 2015 at 00:43 UTC
On article Primer: Why would I buy a mirrorless camera? (563 comments in total)
In reply to:

57even: Here is an interesting thought.

If they had invented mirrorless cameras first, would anyone be bothering to patent a camera with a mechanical mirror, a bunch of prisms, a secondary mirror, and a separate AF sensor...?

While it's true that mirrorless can't quite match SOME of the best DSLRs for sports shooting, yet, DSLRs are more or less at a standstill in terms of development. They are already extremely refined to the point of being about as good as they can possibly be for their respective price bracket.

Mirrorless is barely out of nappies as a digital format. It has a lot of development potential and is moving as fast as EVF and sensor AF technology can forge ahead. Be interesting to be here in another 5 years and see what this guide says then... ;-)

The cameras you see on the touchlines of NFL games also have better AF than 95% of other DSLRs. Mirrorless has already caught up with most of them.

Nor do those cameras on the touchlines have better AF than they did 8 years ago. In another five years, they will still have the same AF and mirrorless will probably have overtaken them.

What will your reasoning be then?

Link | Posted on Dec 9, 2015 at 11:03 UTC
On article Primer: Why would I buy a mirrorless camera? (563 comments in total)
In reply to:

57even: Here is an interesting thought.

If they had invented mirrorless cameras first, would anyone be bothering to patent a camera with a mechanical mirror, a bunch of prisms, a secondary mirror, and a separate AF sensor...?

While it's true that mirrorless can't quite match SOME of the best DSLRs for sports shooting, yet, DSLRs are more or less at a standstill in terms of development. They are already extremely refined to the point of being about as good as they can possibly be for their respective price bracket.

Mirrorless is barely out of nappies as a digital format. It has a lot of development potential and is moving as fast as EVF and sensor AF technology can forge ahead. Be interesting to be here in another 5 years and see what this guide says then... ;-)

The D7200 is based on an AF system first seen in the D3 and D300 in 2008 and not fundamentally changed since.

So where is the 'new' technology? It still has all the issues inherent in an indirect focus system and is just a refinement of previous technology going back far longer than that.

Link | Posted on Dec 8, 2015 at 22:35 UTC
On article Primer: Why would I buy a mirrorless camera? (563 comments in total)
In reply to:

M W B G: No body wants to learn how to use a camera or how to get the best results through trial and error it seems. Sounds like most of you here just want the camera to do everything for you. I enjoy an ovf, and rarely look at the picture just taken. I've learned my camera, trust my instinct and am very happy with the photos I produce. I know what exposure compensation I'm going to need if I think I need it in a situation. It all came from learning the camera and not having to relearn a new mark II or III or whatever new model comes out every six months.(although you don't have to buy the upgrades I suppose) I would like a evf maybe if I was using a manual focus lens as the dslr focusing screens today are meant primarily for AF lenses and aren't precise enough for fast manual lenses. A guy could use live view but it's quite slow imo. Shoot what you like, learn the camera you have, enjoy photography. I don't see the need for the arguing on these forums.

"I don't see the need for the arguing on these forums".

There would be a deafening silence in that case... ;-)

I am less convinced that most matrix metering systems are entirely predictable. Some algorithm making decisions for me leads to less ability to assume what it will do.

I find an EVF quite useful, even after 35 years using a variety of cameras. The last time I could 'nail' exposure using a film camera was when I used the cameras' spot meter and did a quite zone check. A good EVF with an easy to reach EV comp dial is a real boon.

Link | Posted on Dec 8, 2015 at 13:40 UTC
On article Primer: Why would I buy a mirrorless camera? (563 comments in total)

Here is an interesting thought.

If they had invented mirrorless cameras first, would anyone be bothering to patent a camera with a mechanical mirror, a bunch of prisms, a secondary mirror, and a separate AF sensor...?

While it's true that mirrorless can't quite match SOME of the best DSLRs for sports shooting, yet, DSLRs are more or less at a standstill in terms of development. They are already extremely refined to the point of being about as good as they can possibly be for their respective price bracket.

Mirrorless is barely out of nappies as a digital format. It has a lot of development potential and is moving as fast as EVF and sensor AF technology can forge ahead. Be interesting to be here in another 5 years and see what this guide says then... ;-)

Link | Posted on Dec 8, 2015 at 01:56 UTC as 86th comment | 12 replies
On article Primer: Why would I buy a mirrorless camera? (563 comments in total)
In reply to:

Nuno Souto: Once again, the elephant in the room has been missed...
Mirrorless is by design more precise for focusing for one very simple reason: it doesn't have to rely on a flipping mirror subject to imprecise stops potentially causing it to introduce errors in focusing.
What many slr makers try to hide is that the mirror mechanism is a major cause of failed focus shots in their hardware.
And it's been so since the days of film!
With mirrorless, that is simply impossible. Hence why I switched 5 years ago and have never looked back: if my Oly says it's in focus, it is.
And checking for sure in really difficult situations is as easy as twitching the focus ring: it immediately shows me a magnified section of the image where it's dirt easy to get precise focus on. Try to take a shot of an animal through reeds with a slr and then with a mirrorless camera and it'll become very clear why mirrorless is the way to go!

"My dslr focuses before the mirror flips up for the shot, like all dslr's. Maybe you mean mirrorslap for fuzzy images?"

Actually, when the mirror is down, there is a secondary mirror attached to the rear that reflects light into the AF sensor in the camera floor. Any misalignment of that mirror, or the AF sensor, and AF will be unreliable.

Link | Posted on Dec 8, 2015 at 01:48 UTC
On article Primer: Why would I buy a mirrorless camera? (563 comments in total)
In reply to:

Nimbifer: What i want ... in addition to size/weight advantage:
* EVF to see image as it will be recorded
* silent operation (once we finally get global shutter without any moving parts/mech shutter stuff)
* zero vibration (once mech shutter is finally eliminated)

Improvements needed
* AF performance ... Despite DPR hype its still not there. Needs to improve by factor 10, especially tracking moving subjects
* better battery charge - especially larger, expensive FF models like Sony A7 mk II should really do 1000 shots per charge - there is space for a regular 12+ Watthrs standard DSLR-battery. And better battery tech getting available, so 20 Watthrs should be feasible already.
* lens lineup - still poor. Too big, too expensive as far as fuji X goes (esp. For only APS-C image circle) and Sony FE - not intereszed in overpriced zeiss badge, i want FF equivalent to canon EF-M lenses: as small as possible, optically highly competent and dirt cheap.

What i want ... in addition to size/weight advantage:
* EVF to see image as it will be recorded

Already done.

* silent operation (once we finally get global shutter without any moving parts/mech shutter stuff)

Most now support electronic first curtain and full silent mode. No vibration.

* zero vibration (once mech shutter is finally eliminated)

See above.

Link | Posted on Dec 8, 2015 at 01:40 UTC
On article Primer: Why would I buy a mirrorless camera? (563 comments in total)
In reply to:

epx141: I will consider a mirrorless when it does not cost 4x the price of the equivalent DSLR and it mounts Nikon F lenses.

They already do. If you want AF as well, you'll have to wait for the adapter.

Link | Posted on Dec 8, 2015 at 01:38 UTC

After these announcements, they may as well close the still camera business down. Who would buy one if the commitment is not there to support the future product line?

Ironically, this commitment was never forthcoming, hence Samsungs never sold well in the UK anyway. Trying to get accessories or repairs was a joke.

Samsung make disposable consumer items. If they can't be updated over the web, they have no solutions.

It's a real shame, as there was nothing wrong with the technology.

Link | Posted on Nov 27, 2015 at 19:09 UTC as 82nd comment
In reply to:

Jonathan F/2: Only amateurs shoot RAW!

So there is only one type of professional photographer?

I don't know a single pro fashion, advertising, portrait or landscape photographer who doesn't shoot raw.

Of course, if you just shoot news events, who cares?

Link | Posted on Nov 21, 2015 at 21:37 UTC
In reply to:

instamatic: You really don't need RAW most of the time - if speed of delivery is important - like stated here. Proper photography discipline and understanding of lighting will produce excellent JPGs out of camera probably like 95% of the time.

What struck me here, is that the size needs to be limited at 3500 px longest edge, which is about 8 megapixels. This goes contrary to some of the stuff one could read in the past, which stated, that stuff under 11 megapixels is not accepted, etc., etc. But then that probably applied to stock images.

All-in-all I think it's a wise decision, and allows the use of a smartphone alone to download and transfer images to the news agency.

8 megapixels = 4K roughly (diff aspect ratio though).

Way more than enough for newsprint, but they are clearly future proofing their image database for online viewing.

Link | Posted on Nov 19, 2015 at 13:25 UTC

True or not, Samsungs are the worst marketed cameras in the UK. Even in the few stores that sell them (Samsung seems to sell them all through electrical retailers with whom it has existing links) don't have many display models or lenses to test.

As a premium product they would do better to push it through professional retailers and offer the right incentives and support in terms of backup and service.

Even Fuji have managed this. All Fuji models and lenses are available in most dedicated camera stores, and they service their own products rather than farming it out to some hapless third party.

The enthusiast camera market at whom the NX1 is aimed are not going to buy their cameras from a white-goods store or TV shop.

Which is a shame, because I tested an NX1 and was highly impressed with the camera.

Link | Posted on Nov 12, 2015 at 20:00 UTC as 306th comment
On article What's missing? Ming Thein on the state of mirrorless (748 comments in total)
In reply to:

57even: It is not perhaps surprising that mirrorless does not replace DSLR...yet.

To gain market share, mirrorless majored on the big flaw of DSLRs - size and weight. A lot of the compromises more or less derive from that. Less room for buttons, less room for large batteries, and less reserve power for really fast processors.

So, they appeal to people who want the same IQ in a smaller size, but can live without the continuous shooting, all-day battery performance, such as photojournalists, travel and street photographers. Sony's venture into FF has also offered solutions for landscape and studio photographers.

But the bulk of the pro market is involved with events, sport or advertising, and these issues are a big deal, as well as lens range, flash etc. But breaking into this market would require breaking the dominance of Nikon and Canon, which is a whole different challenge.

We are in a state of transition, waiting to see what the big two may do. Who will blink first?

The comments on this site get weirder by the day...

Link | Posted on Nov 7, 2015 at 07:44 UTC
On article What's missing? Ming Thein on the state of mirrorless (748 comments in total)
In reply to:

57even: It is not perhaps surprising that mirrorless does not replace DSLR...yet.

To gain market share, mirrorless majored on the big flaw of DSLRs - size and weight. A lot of the compromises more or less derive from that. Less room for buttons, less room for large batteries, and less reserve power for really fast processors.

So, they appeal to people who want the same IQ in a smaller size, but can live without the continuous shooting, all-day battery performance, such as photojournalists, travel and street photographers. Sony's venture into FF has also offered solutions for landscape and studio photographers.

But the bulk of the pro market is involved with events, sport or advertising, and these issues are a big deal, as well as lens range, flash etc. But breaking into this market would require breaking the dominance of Nikon and Canon, which is a whole different challenge.

We are in a state of transition, waiting to see what the big two may do. Who will blink first?

Carefully designed not to compete with their DSLR line or appeal to pro photographers.

Link | Posted on Nov 7, 2015 at 01:02 UTC
On article What's missing? Ming Thein on the state of mirrorless (748 comments in total)

It is not perhaps surprising that mirrorless does not replace DSLR...yet.

To gain market share, mirrorless majored on the big flaw of DSLRs - size and weight. A lot of the compromises more or less derive from that. Less room for buttons, less room for large batteries, and less reserve power for really fast processors.

So, they appeal to people who want the same IQ in a smaller size, but can live without the continuous shooting, all-day battery performance, such as photojournalists, travel and street photographers. Sony's venture into FF has also offered solutions for landscape and studio photographers.

But the bulk of the pro market is involved with events, sport or advertising, and these issues are a big deal, as well as lens range, flash etc. But breaking into this market would require breaking the dominance of Nikon and Canon, which is a whole different challenge.

We are in a state of transition, waiting to see what the big two may do. Who will blink first?

Link | Posted on Nov 6, 2015 at 23:20 UTC as 93rd comment | 7 replies
In reply to:

arhmatic: The entire idea of "camera bags" is dead to me. this is really a thief magnet and nothing else. Just get any bag you want ant fit it with padding per your needs.

That's exactly what I do. There are loads of foam inserts and dividers.

My tatty old canvas satchel is as dog earned and weather-beaten as I am. Nothing too tempting in either case ;-)

But hey, some folk like to look the part...

Link | Posted on Nov 3, 2015 at 22:08 UTC
On article DxO ONE real-world sample gallery (185 comments in total)

Pricey but not bad. IQ is a big step up from an iPhone.

Can we have an Android version soon please?

Link | Posted on Sep 21, 2015 at 23:08 UTC as 37th comment | 3 replies

Why does everyone tout every new cool thing as being 'the future'. It's just one more option. Sometimes it's transformational, sometimes it's not.

This is not the future of photography. The 2D image is alive and well if all the exhibitions and awards I have been to this year are any indication. It may be an interesting niche specialisation, but its not transformational. It's not 'the future' its 'a future addition'. Journalistic hyperbole by prepositional abuse.

When GB broadband is more commonplace, 3D VR is likely to be transformational for other applications such as conferencing, skypeing, collaborative/remote working, education, dramas and movies, gaming etc. I can also see a future for "virtual tourism" but that would be more interesting as an enhancement to Google Earth, rather than Flickr.

On the other hand, can you image what a virtual reality full of Amazon pop-up ads will be like? Virtual hell. I can see a big market for ad-blockers.

Link | Posted on Sep 15, 2015 at 09:51 UTC as 11th comment
In reply to:

phazelag: The FZ1000 jpegs and raws all look better at 3200 and up. I wonder if Sony is not capable of getting the most out of their sensors. I expected cleaner with the talk of the stacked sensor.

I think the main driver for BSI on large sensors (given that you still can't place photodiodes too close together or you get diffusion and light scatter) is countering light fall-off due to angle of incidence. This seems to be true of the A7Rii.

May also lead in near future to a true global shutter sensor as well. ADU per pixel. Now that would be something.

Link | Posted on Sep 8, 2015 at 09:50 UTC
Total: 486, showing: 41 – 60
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