fmian

fmian

Lives in Australia Sydney, Australia
Works as a Photographer/Re-toucher/Consultant
Has a website at www.primephotography.com.au
Joined on Mar 28, 2010
About me:

If you're reading this it's probably because I've been a smart a$$ or rubbed you the wrong way from some uncomfortable truth. Don't worry. You'll get used to it and it doesn't mean I don't love you.

Comments

Total: 434, showing: 41 – 60
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On Readers' Showcase: Maxime Siegler article (48 comments in total)

Some lovely work here :)
Thanks for sharing.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 16, 2015 at 01:02 UTC as 31st comment
In reply to:

Marty4650: Before the EM5 II, the EM10 had a few features the EM5 lacked. And now the EM5 II fixed that, but has a few features the EM1 lacks.

You really can never have three discrete products that stair step beautifully, unless you release all three on the same date, then update all three on the same date.

And this is nothing new for Olympus. When the E30 came out, it had a better sensor and more features than the E3 had. Olympus always puts their latest technology into their latest camera, rather than holding it back for the "flagship's next upgrade" like Canon and Nikon usually do.

Ahh.. but perhaps not when you consider format sizes.
I think the size was the main factor that determined how 'PRO' you were. To a degree this is still the case, but there is actual segmentation within format sizes with digital.
I don't think it's as big of an issue as some people make it out to be though. Any camera in good hands can still produce good results.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 11, 2015 at 03:14 UTC
In reply to:

Marty4650: Before the EM5 II, the EM10 had a few features the EM5 lacked. And now the EM5 II fixed that, but has a few features the EM1 lacks.

You really can never have three discrete products that stair step beautifully, unless you release all three on the same date, then update all three on the same date.

And this is nothing new for Olympus. When the E30 came out, it had a better sensor and more features than the E3 had. Olympus always puts their latest technology into their latest camera, rather than holding it back for the "flagship's next upgrade" like Canon and Nikon usually do.

Totally agree, after spending a lot of money on the latest computer tech I finally decided just to buy things that are 2-3 generations old. You find things at better value for money, more matured firmware and the market almost never demands the latest tech anyway.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 11, 2015 at 02:20 UTC
In reply to:

Marty4650: Before the EM5 II, the EM10 had a few features the EM5 lacked. And now the EM5 II fixed that, but has a few features the EM1 lacks.

You really can never have three discrete products that stair step beautifully, unless you release all three on the same date, then update all three on the same date.

And this is nothing new for Olympus. When the E30 came out, it had a better sensor and more features than the E3 had. Olympus always puts their latest technology into their latest camera, rather than holding it back for the "flagship's next upgrade" like Canon and Nikon usually do.

Marty4650: You know you gotta wait for the EM5 III cause Olympus have already stated that it will have a faster high resolution mode ;)

RichRMA: 'That hold-back is what has produce a "class system" in digital that never existed in film.'
I don't think this is correct.
There were overlapping models released by many brands with more/less features, and metal/plastic bodies, mechanical/electronic components, long/short shutter lifespans, faster/slower max shutter speeds etc...

Direct link | Posted on Mar 11, 2015 at 00:18 UTC
On Flasher smartphone flash launched on Kickstarter post (73 comments in total)
In reply to:

fmian: Why not just use a handheld LED torchlight?
You can control direction that way, set it up on a table while you shoot from elsewhere. Or even use a second one for hairlight...

Or you could just put a correction gel infront of it...

Direct link | Posted on Mar 10, 2015 at 23:35 UTC
On Flasher smartphone flash launched on Kickstarter post (73 comments in total)

Why not just use a handheld LED torchlight?
You can control direction that way, set it up on a table while you shoot from elsewhere. Or even use a second one for hairlight...

Direct link | Posted on Mar 9, 2015 at 22:14 UTC as 35th comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

fmian: Full frame camera with a major feature being crop mode for crop lenses.
What's the big deal about a crop mode? I can easily create a lightroom preset to do the same thing.
Am I missing the importance of this??
Enlighten me.

@ragmanjin
Your original statement said that APS-C lenses won't mount on full frame Canon bodies.
What about all the APS-C lenses with Canon mount made by Sigma and Tamron?
What you should have written is 'Sorry, by APS-C lenses I was only talking about Canon branded EF-S lenses and how they can't mount to a Canon FF'.

ps. My website isn't a blog.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 9, 2015 at 01:00 UTC
In reply to:

fmian: Full frame camera with a major feature being crop mode for crop lenses.
What's the big deal about a crop mode? I can easily create a lightroom preset to do the same thing.
Am I missing the importance of this??
Enlighten me.

@ragmanjin
'When you consider the fact that you can't even mount an APS-C lens on a full-frame Canon body'
Yes you can. Plenty of people myself included have done it.
Please refrain from reporting 'facts' when you can't clearly write a statement.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 9, 2015 at 00:20 UTC
In reply to:

Everlast66: For any other manufacturer I'd say it is a bad idea to re-introduce a FF DSLR line now, when mirror-less cameras are aggressively eating into DSLR sales. Especially that the FF lens line has not been maintained for a while. I almost feel they' should've rather created a new FF mirror-less system rather than going back.

However, I feel Pentax have the most loyal customer base of the big three DSLR makers and I think they will not be affected as bad by mirror-less rise. I certainly hope they succeed as there is something likeable about them that's lacking in Canon and Nikon.

I'd say it would make more sense for Pentax to make k-mount 35mm SLR film cameras again.
Aren't K-1000's still highly sought after with educational instistutes? For sure they would sell more of those than a full frame DSLR.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 8, 2015 at 23:10 UTC
In reply to:

fmian: Full frame camera with a major feature being crop mode for crop lenses.
What's the big deal about a crop mode? I can easily create a lightroom preset to do the same thing.
Am I missing the importance of this??
Enlighten me.

Again.. I don't see why this was something that needed reassurance for Pentax users in the first place...
Pentax crop lenses don't have a full frame restrictive mount like EF-S does. You can put a crop pentax lens on a K mount 135 film body right?
You can put a Nikon DX lens on FX body. Same with Sony E & A mount.
A non-Canon crop lens can fit on a full frame Canon body (eg. Sigma 30mm on 5D)
Perhaps Pentax users have been in the dark about 35mm full frame for so long they need a refresher or something...

Direct link | Posted on Mar 8, 2015 at 23:07 UTC

Full frame camera with a major feature being crop mode for crop lenses.
What's the big deal about a crop mode? I can easily create a lightroom preset to do the same thing.
Am I missing the importance of this??
Enlighten me.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 8, 2015 at 22:48 UTC as 42nd comment | 15 replies
In reply to:

RichRMA: One thing about FF; if the edge definition of my m4/3 Olympus 12-40mm was as bad as either of these two lenses, I'd return it.

The E-M5 II shoots 40mp only with a tripod, with 2-3 second exposure and minimum aperture of f/8.
So your comparison is moot.
And it's near impossible to shoot portraiture in that mode.
You might as well go and shoot large format wet plate collodion or something..

Direct link | Posted on Mar 5, 2015 at 23:47 UTC
On CP+ 2015 Sigma Interview article (197 comments in total)
In reply to:

PhotoKhan: "Mr Yamaki tells us that even though his company loses money on cameras /.../"

They shouldn't have gone after such a small niche market.

After all, color deficiency only affects about 8% of men and 0,5% of women.

Probably film cameras RichRMA :p

Direct link | Posted on Mar 5, 2015 at 22:43 UTC
On CP+ 2015 Sigma Interview article (197 comments in total)
In reply to:

PhotoKhan: "Mr Yamaki tells us that even though his company loses money on cameras /.../"

They shouldn't have gone after such a small niche market.

After all, color deficiency only affects about 8% of men and 0,5% of women.

Did you read the rest of the interview?
They wouldn't be able to make such high grade lenses if it wasn't for their camera/sensor division.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 5, 2015 at 00:23 UTC
On CP+ 2015 Sigma Interview article (197 comments in total)

A refreshingly insightful interview.
Void of any marketing BS and knocking of other brands.
Olympus, Nikon and Canon execs should take note here.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 5, 2015 at 00:21 UTC as 68th comment
In reply to:

Gollan: Those are very interesting photos, mostly portraits. I wasn't expecting so many head and shoulders images. How long were the exposures when these were made? In any case, the subjects are displaying an admirable ability to keep still. A couple of the images appear to be post-mortem, but perhaps I am misinterpreting a classical pose.

Exposure time would have varied depending on whether it was direct sunlight or indoor window lit, and the sensitivity of the emulsion.
Typically would have been between 1 and 3 ISO.
I've had indoor window lit portraits taken on wet plate collodion and I had to sit still for 2 minutes.
Another one I had taken was outdoors in direct midday light (no clouds, was hard not to squint) and that was about 2-3 seconds.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 3, 2015 at 02:52 UTC

WOW WOW WOW WOW!!
As someone who has been collecting British glass plate photographs from the early 1900's I am just in an inspired awe. I really need to contact print some of mine and do the history some justice by making an album of them.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 27, 2015 at 00:24 UTC as 29th comment | 1 reply
On Lytro sheds jobs as it shifts focus to video article (506 comments in total)
In reply to:

fmian: Well if the new tech is for pro video, then what kind of resolution, frame rates and resulting file sizes will we expect? Special software to edit the proprietary files in a very limited manner?
What kind of a reception will a video maker get when their peers see that they don't even know what is supposed to be focused on while filming? It begs for the creativity to flow in post and for uncheckable errors to be made on set.
Video makers already use multiple cameras for different angles and focal points to edit together creatively. More control and it promotes a clearer understanding of what you are trying to do.
If it's for surveillance video, why wouldn't someone just use an ultrawide lens with an appropriate hyperfocal distance/setting?

Still... very limited application and I can only see this tech being used for scientific purposes rather than the consumer/pro market.

Lytro need to get their head out and figure out who their tech suits best.

Reliance on technology to overcome poor technique and skills.
You're right, that's a big market to cater to.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 26, 2015 at 22:57 UTC
On Lytro sheds jobs as it shifts focus to video article (506 comments in total)
In reply to:

fmian: Well if the new tech is for pro video, then what kind of resolution, frame rates and resulting file sizes will we expect? Special software to edit the proprietary files in a very limited manner?
What kind of a reception will a video maker get when their peers see that they don't even know what is supposed to be focused on while filming? It begs for the creativity to flow in post and for uncheckable errors to be made on set.
Video makers already use multiple cameras for different angles and focal points to edit together creatively. More control and it promotes a clearer understanding of what you are trying to do.
If it's for surveillance video, why wouldn't someone just use an ultrawide lens with an appropriate hyperfocal distance/setting?

Still... very limited application and I can only see this tech being used for scientific purposes rather than the consumer/pro market.

Lytro need to get their head out and figure out who their tech suits best.

Lol.. you could shoot with hyperfocal settings or a better angle so everything is in focus anyway. People have been shooting tennis just fine with the ball in focus so far...
If you're talking about tracking focus while maintaining shallow DOF I think that's outside the current bounds of Lytro. Possibly something they can work towards with software. Having said that, hardware based automated follow focus solutions already exist.
http://nofilmschool.com/2014/04/cinema-control-laboratories-andra-motion-follow-focus-system

Direct link | Posted on Feb 26, 2015 at 04:07 UTC
On Lytro sheds jobs as it shifts focus to video article (506 comments in total)
In reply to:

fmian: Well if the new tech is for pro video, then what kind of resolution, frame rates and resulting file sizes will we expect? Special software to edit the proprietary files in a very limited manner?
What kind of a reception will a video maker get when their peers see that they don't even know what is supposed to be focused on while filming? It begs for the creativity to flow in post and for uncheckable errors to be made on set.
Video makers already use multiple cameras for different angles and focal points to edit together creatively. More control and it promotes a clearer understanding of what you are trying to do.
If it's for surveillance video, why wouldn't someone just use an ultrawide lens with an appropriate hyperfocal distance/setting?

Still... very limited application and I can only see this tech being used for scientific purposes rather than the consumer/pro market.

Lytro need to get their head out and figure out who their tech suits best.

HowaboutRAW: You're making a pretty loose connection there.
By thought process I am talking about design, script, storyboarding etc in pro video.
The only thing that todays action cams and drones have done is give the OPTION to people who couldn't otherwise afford to hire a helicoptor/crane etc and organise the red tape that surrounds those things. The thought process is still the same.
The Lytro concept however (this is my opinion) encourages people to preconceptualise less, and try to figure it out later. Which I think is a bad thing.
Perhaps you could give me an example of how a hypothetical Lytro video camera could be used to produce a result that would be otherwise impossible?
It's entirely likely that I'm just not using my imagination enough.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 26, 2015 at 03:27 UTC
Total: 434, showing: 41 – 60
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