Pixnat2

Pixnat2

Lives in Switzerland Switzerland
Works as a Geographer / Urban Planner
Has a website at http://azurphoto.com/
Joined on Feb 22, 2007

Comments

Total: 67, showing: 1 – 20
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I think this comparaison makes a lot of sense, and I welcome it.

Nowadays, IQ difference between FF, APS-C and 4/3 has become negligible. All those sensor formats are suitable for enthusiast and professional use.
The choice of a camera today should no more focus on mere "sensor size", but on camera functionalities and handling, lenses avaliable and format specificities.

So thanks DPR, articles like this would allow some people's minds to evolve.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 4, 2014 at 16:48 UTC as 153rd comment | 7 replies
In reply to:

Marty4650: It may be unrealistic for anyone to expect revolutionary leaps and bounds from a mature technology.

Digital Imaging is now a mature technology, and we can expect much more of this evolutionary continuous improvement in new models. This might give us very little reason to replace last year's model, but will be wonderful for first time buyers, people switching systems, and people who upgrade every five to ten years. They will be shocked by the sum total of all the small improvements combined.

Just like with cars, no one expects the 2015 Toyota Corolla to be very much better than the 2014 Toyota Corolla, but we all know it will be much nicer (and much more expensive) than a 2003 Toyota Corolla.

John,
Furious updates cycles in mirorrless is already over. It was there from 2009 to 2012, but now all mirrorless cameras have similar IQ. The IQ difference between 1', 4/3 and APS-C sensor is small nowadays, so is the IQ difference between the best APS-C and FF
I don't think current technology can go much further in DR dept.
You have a point for video, which is THE segment where room for improvement exist. But 4K is already overkill for casual shooters, who are the frequent upgraders. Add to that the present big drop in sales due to smartphones concurrence, which means losses for traditional Photography companies, the bad state of World Economy, and you'll have all the ingredients for a big slowdown.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 30, 2014 at 18:24 UTC
In reply to:

Marty4650: It may be unrealistic for anyone to expect revolutionary leaps and bounds from a mature technology.

Digital Imaging is now a mature technology, and we can expect much more of this evolutionary continuous improvement in new models. This might give us very little reason to replace last year's model, but will be wonderful for first time buyers, people switching systems, and people who upgrade every five to ten years. They will be shocked by the sum total of all the small improvements combined.

Just like with cars, no one expects the 2015 Toyota Corolla to be very much better than the 2014 Toyota Corolla, but we all know it will be much nicer (and much more expensive) than a 2003 Toyota Corolla.

@ John C Tharp
Of course "this isn't it". There still will be significant leaps and bounds ahead in Photography, but at a much slower pace than in the previous 15 years. The cycle of updates has already slowed considerably, as current technology is now mature.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 30, 2014 at 08:45 UTC
In reply to:

Marty4650: It may be unrealistic for anyone to expect revolutionary leaps and bounds from a mature technology.

Digital Imaging is now a mature technology, and we can expect much more of this evolutionary continuous improvement in new models. This might give us very little reason to replace last year's model, but will be wonderful for first time buyers, people switching systems, and people who upgrade every five to ten years. They will be shocked by the sum total of all the small improvements combined.

Just like with cars, no one expects the 2015 Toyota Corolla to be very much better than the 2014 Toyota Corolla, but we all know it will be much nicer (and much more expensive) than a 2003 Toyota Corolla.

Well said. This maturity is wecomed IMHO.
The funny thing is that it will take some time for people used to constant upgrades to adapt this new situation.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 28, 2014 at 07:25 UTC
On Nikon 1 V3: Real-world Sample Images article (175 comments in total)
In reply to:

Aspenz: Don't like it, don't buy it, simple as.

The IQ is pretty decent and high iso has improved. I've never seen a difference between the M43 and N1 images anyway apart from iso, and it's more or less equal now. If anything, the Olympus cameras have sharpening haloes and M43 in general has poor rendition of highlights. It's funny when the M43 crowd equate themselves with APS-C or worse still FF, when there clearly is a difference.

And as good as these are they're still jpegs. If you know what you're doing with the raw files there's lots of details to be gotten.

Aspenz:
That's not an opinion but a fact.
Anyway, that's cool if you're happy with the N1.
The most important is not the gear, but the pictures taken with it. In the right hands, the N1 is capable of wonderful results, I have no doubts.
Cheers!

Direct link | Posted on Jun 11, 2014 at 07:56 UTC
On Nikon 1 V3: Real-world Sample Images article (175 comments in total)
In reply to:

Aspenz: Don't like it, don't buy it, simple as.

The IQ is pretty decent and high iso has improved. I've never seen a difference between the M43 and N1 images anyway apart from iso, and it's more or less equal now. If anything, the Olympus cameras have sharpening haloes and M43 in general has poor rendition of highlights. It's funny when the M43 crowd equate themselves with APS-C or worse still FF, when there clearly is a difference.

And as good as these are they're still jpegs. If you know what you're doing with the raw files there's lots of details to be gotten.

Aspenz, Howabout RAW:
The N1 system has made very nice jump in IQ since the beginning. But the rest of photographic industry didn't stayed still too.
The current 1 sensor have now reached more or less the level of the first 12Mpix m4/3 sensor, which is quiet an achievement (it has even better DR and resolution).
But the last m4/3 sensors have much better IQ, no contest.
The N1 system has its own strong points (AF, fps, acess to Nikon lenses,...). It's near ideal for birders.
But in pure IQ, it's behind other mirrorless systems.
More of a concern for N1 users is the Sony DSC-RX100 MIII : smaller, cheaper and better IQ.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 11, 2014 at 07:28 UTC
On Nikon 1 V3: Real-world Sample Images article (175 comments in total)
In reply to:

Aspenz: Don't like it, don't buy it, simple as.

The IQ is pretty decent and high iso has improved. I've never seen a difference between the M43 and N1 images anyway apart from iso, and it's more or less equal now. If anything, the Olympus cameras have sharpening haloes and M43 in general has poor rendition of highlights. It's funny when the M43 crowd equate themselves with APS-C or worse still FF, when there clearly is a difference.

And as good as these are they're still jpegs. If you know what you're doing with the raw files there's lots of details to be gotten.

That's not true. FWIW, take a look at the dpreview comparometer : m4/3 and APS-C are pretty similar, Nikon 1 is clearly behind.

Those images are good, but the Nikon 1 IQ is on the advanced compact league, not m4/3 or APS-C.

That said, Nikon 1 has a great advantage in AF and 20fps, pretty impressive.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 10, 2014 at 08:20 UTC
In reply to:

Pixnat2: My Canon 5D was plagued with dust, I had to pay to clean it.
My Nikon D600 will be forever free to clean.

Lifetime cleaning warranty, how can't I be happy? :-)

No problem, I have 2 other cameras which don't need to be cleaned, thanks m4/3 :-)
Life's beautiful ;-)

Direct link | Posted on Jun 3, 2014 at 16:57 UTC

My Canon 5D was plagued with dust, I had to pay to clean it.
My Nikon D600 will be forever free to clean.

Lifetime cleaning warranty, how can't I be happy? :-)

Direct link | Posted on Jun 3, 2014 at 15:44 UTC as 39th comment | 3 replies
On DxOMark recommends best lenses for the Nikon D800E article (72 comments in total)

Amazing performance of the Nikon AF-S 18-35mm f/3.5-4.5G ED!
Best bang for the bucks for landscapes.

Direct link | Posted on May 22, 2014 at 17:38 UTC as 20th comment | 2 replies
On Little beauty: Nordin Seruyan's macro images article (352 comments in total)
In reply to:

DStudio: I think people are misunderstanding which ethics are important here. The treatment of the animals - while important - is a red herring. The real ethical issue is of deceiving viewers by making up stories, telling them that these fabricated pictures are journalistic in nature. Nordin used these tricks to become more popular, allowing these stories to remain in the popular press for years before saying anything.

Now that he's published a preponderance of similar images - too many to be coincidental and naturally occurring - he's got a new story. We can only presume that his "new truth" is in fact half-truths.

Yup, that's the kind of story I teach to my chidren to prevent lies.

But I say them also :
Who wants to blow another's nose must have clean fingers...

Everybody should be given a chance to redeem.

M Seruyan was honest in his replies here, that what counts. Not what he has done before.

Direct link | Posted on May 19, 2014 at 08:23 UTC
On Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 III First Impressions Review preview (2970 comments in total)

Pop up viewfinder, a very clever idea!
Kudos to Sony's engineers for their sense of innovation.
Now I hope other camera makers will follow.

Direct link | Posted on May 16, 2014 at 08:06 UTC as 695th comment | 1 reply
On Little beauty: Nordin Seruyan's macro images article (352 comments in total)
In reply to:

DStudio: I think people are misunderstanding which ethics are important here. The treatment of the animals - while important - is a red herring. The real ethical issue is of deceiving viewers by making up stories, telling them that these fabricated pictures are journalistic in nature. Nordin used these tricks to become more popular, allowing these stories to remain in the popular press for years before saying anything.

Now that he's published a preponderance of similar images - too many to be coincidental and naturally occurring - he's got a new story. We can only presume that his "new truth" is in fact half-truths.

What I hope now is that the inquisitors could forgive M. Seruyan to have told some stories, stop to burn him on the Altar of Ethics, and apologize for the harm they've done to his reputation.

Direct link | Posted on May 16, 2014 at 06:34 UTC
On Little beauty: Nordin Seruyan's macro images article (352 comments in total)
In reply to:

DStudio: I think people are misunderstanding which ethics are important here. The treatment of the animals - while important - is a red herring. The real ethical issue is of deceiving viewers by making up stories, telling them that these fabricated pictures are journalistic in nature. Nordin used these tricks to become more popular, allowing these stories to remain in the popular press for years before saying anything.

Now that he's published a preponderance of similar images - too many to be coincidental and naturally occurring - he's got a new story. We can only presume that his "new truth" is in fact half-truths.

Before argumenting further, let's look at the context.
On one part, there's M. Seruyan. He's been published by Dprerview without asking for it. Some people quickly point that those pictures were not 100% natural. M Seruyan admited it honestly. The case should have been closed.
On the other side, we have an army of inquisitors. They were not satisfied with M. Seruyan honest answer in this site. They wanted to show that M. Seruyan is guilty. They dig in his past to point a possible mistake that he made. They found links about some stories M. Seruyan could have made, and without veryfing the sources or how those stories were made, pointed it out to show that he is guilty.

Guilty of what? Having told some funny stories in the past? Is it a crime? Did M. Seruyan harmed or attack the moral integrity of anybody? I don't see how.

But the inquisitors packed together to destroy the reputation of a man that has made no harm to anybody. They did harm the moral integrity of a man. Who's bad?

Direct link | Posted on May 16, 2014 at 05:05 UTC
On Little beauty: Nordin Seruyan's macro images article (352 comments in total)
In reply to:

DStudio: I think people are misunderstanding which ethics are important here. The treatment of the animals - while important - is a red herring. The real ethical issue is of deceiving viewers by making up stories, telling them that these fabricated pictures are journalistic in nature. Nordin used these tricks to become more popular, allowing these stories to remain in the popular press for years before saying anything.

Now that he's published a preponderance of similar images - too many to be coincidental and naturally occurring - he's got a new story. We can only presume that his "new truth" is in fact half-truths.

Teru Kage :

Did you read M. Seruyan post? He told that :

- he used Photoshop
- he moved the bugs into place in some cases, he even posted a video made in April 2013 to show it.

Where did someone pretend that the pictures posted here IN DPREVIEW were 100% natural?

So don't you think accusing him of fakery while he is 100% honest is defamation?

Had he done some mistakes in the past? Maybe.

Anyway, did you nerver made mistakes, M. Kage? If people would go to dig in your past to point your earlier mistakes, would you think it's "ethical"?

Direct link | Posted on May 15, 2014 at 18:18 UTC
On Little beauty: Nordin Seruyan's macro images article (352 comments in total)
In reply to:

DStudio: I think people are misunderstanding which ethics are important here. The treatment of the animals - while important - is a red herring. The real ethical issue is of deceiving viewers by making up stories, telling them that these fabricated pictures are journalistic in nature. Nordin used these tricks to become more popular, allowing these stories to remain in the popular press for years before saying anything.

Now that he's published a preponderance of similar images - too many to be coincidental and naturally occurring - he's got a new story. We can only presume that his "new truth" is in fact half-truths.

You should take care with you choice of words.

In real life (outside the Internet sphere), you could be brought to court for those accusations. If you couldn't prove what you said (those links can't be considered as proofs, even remotely), you would risk to be charged for defamation.

Defamation is much more unethical than all the things that you accuse M. Seruyan.

Make an attack on the moral integrity of a person is a more serious offense than manipulating insects or telling stories.

My advice is to stop this inquisition and present your appologies to M. Seruyan.

Direct link | Posted on May 15, 2014 at 07:00 UTC
On Little beauty: Nordin Seruyan's macro images article (352 comments in total)
In reply to:

Spoff: This site should take these photos down. Would they post them if they were of people manipulated in such a manner against their will? They are in bad taste. I have no issue with heavy photoshop work but hurting beings to get a picture simply has no place here.

Spoff

Spoff : thank you for your sensible last post. You are right at the fact that hurting animals in order to get a picture is objectionable.
But manipulating an animal without hurting it and release it free after that isn't. We humans manipulate animals all the time : dogs, cats, cattle, etc. Biologists, who love nature, kill insects for their taxonomic collections displayed in museum all over the world, put electronic tags on their ears, fins, feet in order to follow their migrations, and so on. Manipulating animals for multiple reasons is done everyday everywhere in the world, that's a part of our life.
To conclude, I would like to open a thought : are zoo pictures, that we see on numerous forums taken by people who test their consumer zooms, less objectionable than Nordin's, thinking in terms of animal condition?
Have a nice day.

Direct link | Posted on May 14, 2014 at 04:55 UTC
On Little beauty: Nordin Seruyan's macro images article (352 comments in total)
In reply to:

Pixnat2: To all shocked people : did you ever smashed a bug just because it was in your house?
If yes, then you're Hypocrits
If no, congratulations, you have true respect for insects and have the right to be schoked.

mansod
Sure, Nordin had probably made some mistakes, as we all do! But pointing a blog with discutable methods doesn't prove that Nordin's images linked in Dpreview are unethical.
I took his defense too, because the accusations posted by some posters follow the same process as a "Witch Hunt" : people stating with authority that Nordin is guilty, without real proofs. This kind of Internet Inquisition is frightening, and saddens me much more than the blog's pictures.
Anyway, I'm really glad that we're in agreement, thanks!
Have a great day!

Direct link | Posted on May 13, 2014 at 09:07 UTC
On Little beauty: Nordin Seruyan's macro images article (352 comments in total)
In reply to:

Spoff: This site should take these photos down. Would they post them if they were of people manipulated in such a manner against their will? They are in bad taste. I have no issue with heavy photoshop work but hurting beings to get a picture simply has no place here.

Spoff

No miles green. You are the accusator, so you have to prove it. Until then, he's presumed innocent.

Direct link | Posted on May 13, 2014 at 08:54 UTC
On Little beauty: Nordin Seruyan's macro images article (352 comments in total)
In reply to:

Pixnat2: To all shocked people : did you ever smashed a bug just because it was in your house?
If yes, then you're Hypocrits
If no, congratulations, you have true respect for insects and have the right to be schoked.

mansod :
The debate arose when somebody linked the blog describing some methods used for this type of images. Those are questionable. But the images from Nordin Seruyan presented here in dpreview are not of this type. As in every practice, there's a limit not to cross, ethically. I don't think the images in Dpreview crossed that line. But the images in the blog maby went too far. Nordin's images have a certain taste, kitsch, but kitsch is really appreciated in Asia.
You made a point : people can be shocked about both. If they are and, which is the most important, act accordingly, they're not hypocrits. So it's worth to look at one's own deeds before accusing others, that what I meant.
Somebody who eats meat produced in cattle feedlots should stop it before being outraged by displacing some insects to make a picture, for example. Cows spending their life in feedlots suffer much more than a displaced insect for a pic. Let's be coherent.

Direct link | Posted on May 13, 2014 at 08:12 UTC
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